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post #1 of 63 (permalink) Old 08-03-2013, 01:02 PM Thread Starter
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Lightbulb 52 Maine/NH Factoids Now Complete

In order to prepare you for your trip to SW 4 in Maine, and to ensure you have a great time while you're here, we'll publish a new factoid about Maine every week until SW 4. Most will be much shorter than this one.

Factoid #1:

Maine is the largest of the six New England states, nearly equaling the land mass of the other 5 states combined. Maine contains 17 million acres of forestland, 6,000 lakes and ponds, 32,000 miles of rivers and streams, 2,000 islands, half-a-million acres of national and state parks and just 1.3 million people.

The southern 1/3 of the state, from the Capital City of Augusta to it's largest city, Portland, and areas south to the NH border is the most developed, is the highest populated, and has a per capita income that is significantly higher than the rest of Maine. The face of southern Maine has changed dramatically because of these factors. This portion of the state has been inundated with folks who have retired here from all parts of the country, but mostly from the cities of the northeast, or have moved here and still travel to Boston to work every day.

The rest of Maine is what most Mainers consider to be the one TRUE Maine. It is well known and accepted as fact, (at least by those liviing north of Augusta), that there are two Maines - the one that has become little more than an outgrowth of Boston, and the rest of the state. In the true Maine you won't be considered a "Mainah" because you moved here, bought a house, and have put down roots. You'll still be considered as "from away" ... which is a polite term for describing you as some city dweller or flatlander that has moved to Maine and seems real nice, but probably still can't be trusted with the location of your favorite trout hole. Around these parts you aren't considered to be a native unless you can produce both of your great-grandparents' Maine birth certificates!

Factoid #2 - Maine is the only state in the United States that is bordered by only one other state. It's the United State's most northeastern state and is bordered by New Hampshire on the west and south, Quebec, Canada on the north, New Brunswick, Canada on the northeast and the Atlantic Ocean to the east / south east.

Factoid #2A - Bonus factoid. Maine's most northern county is Aroostook County and it is the biggest county in the state. It is so large (6,453 square miles) that it actually covers an area greater than the combined size of the states of Connecticut and Rhode Island.

Factoid #3 - How many people live here? Maine's current population is 1.33 million people spread over 33,215 square miles for a population density of 42 people per square mile. Most of Maine's population is located in the southern 1/3 of the state, in the Portland area. Maine is the most sparsely populated state east of the Mississippi.

Factoid #4 - Maine's coast line is over 5,500 miles long and has over 2,000 islands. Maine has a reputation for it's excellent shellfish, and leads the country by a large margin in the amount of American lobster landed each year. 2012 reports indicate that 126,091,174 pounds of lobster with a value of $338,942,522 were landed, which are the highest lobster landings and value recorded since DMR and National Marine Fisheries Service began keeping records.



Factoid #6 - Lobster Facts - There is a lot of misinformation and ol' wives tales associated with lobsters. They are NOT red when they come out of he water! They are a dark green, green/brown when alive. They turn red when cooked. I lived in Illinois for about 7-8 years. When we first moved there we were asked so many questions about lobsters that we thought we'd have some lobsters and steamer clams flown in and invite 4 couples from work that we socialized with occassionally. When I started to boil the water on an outdoor gas burner, one of the wives announced that she'd like to go inside (from the deck) because she didn't think she could stand the screaming from the lobster when you put them into the water. I assured her that I had cooked hundreds of lobsters and had yet to have a single one make any noise, never mind scream! She was convinced 100% that based on what someone had told her that they would scream. They didn't, but they tasted awful good!

This link has everything you ever wanted to know about lobsters, and more:
http://maine-lobster.com/lobster-facts


A live lobster ready for the pot


Three rare color mutations of live lobsters - mottled, blue and 2 tone


2 tone - the rarest of all. 1 in 50 million. This one was caught in Maine this August


Factoid #6 - Madawaska, Maine is one of the 4 official sites of the U.S. Four Corners Motorcycle Tour, along with Key West, FL., Blaine, Washington, and San Yisidro, CA. The premise of the four corners tour is that you must ride to all four destinations within a 21 day period. Here's the link to more info in case anyone wants to tie this into your trip to Maine for SW4, or for some future date.



Factoid #7 - Maine is known as "The Lighthouse State". Here's some information regarding it's rich history of lighthouses:


A History of Guiding Sailors to Safety
Carved by glaciers thousands of years ago, Maine’s coastline is a jumble of points, passages, bays, inlets, coves, and fjord-like fingers of land reaching into a sea dotted by hundreds of little islands, ledges and shoals. To navigate these unusually complicated and dangerous waters, mariners needed help. Beginning in 1794, an array of lighthouses was established to help them find their way.

The lighthouses stood atop dangerous isles and ledges, warning skippers to beware. They guided vessels to navigable water channels and marked the mouths of rivers. During the most terrible storms and the foggiest nights, they stood against the elements, fixed points of light and hope helping sailors of all sorts to chart a safe course to their destinations.

Maine is known as “The Lighthouse State” for good reasons. By the turn of the 20th century, at least 70 lighthouses guarded its craggy seacoast, its deepest rivers and even one lake. A mariner could sail up and down the coast and always have a lighthouse in sight. Sixty-five of these beacons still stand. There are more lighthouses here than in any other states but Michigan and New York, and more coastal lighthouses than anywhere in the nation! Maine is a great place to see the distinctive towers and explore their rich history.

The lighthouses became much more than directional aids. In their remote and often spectacular settings, they developed a distinctive look that continues to appeal to admirers of beauty and proportion and also to those who enjoy Yankee ingenuity, along with its occasional quirks. With some science and luck and quite a few mistakes, they came to have a luminous, effective technology.

Somehow Maine lighthouses attracted a cadre of keepers who, with their families and other assistants, were remarkable not only for their dedication to the job but for their many acts of bravery and heroism as well as some misbehavior and even madness.

This image is of the "Portland Head Light", a historic lighthouse in Cape Elizabeth, Maine. The light station sits on a head of land at the entrance of the primary shipping channel into Portland Harbor, which is within Casco Bay in the Gulf of Maine. Completed in 1791, it is the oldest lighthouse in the state of Maine.



Go to "52 Factoids about Maine Part 2" thread to continue ......

“Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming “Wow! What a Ride!” - HST

Last edited by Uncle Fuzzy; 09-21-2013 at 10:16 PM.
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post #2 of 63 (permalink) Old 09-21-2013, 02:27 PM Thread Starter
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52 factoids about Maine - part 2

Factoid #8 - Maine's Covered Bridges


There are no records of the men who built Maine's covered bridges. Available town documents show that the chief concern of the thrifty citizens at town meetings was the amount of money their new bridge was to cost - which was entered to the last odd cent - and a brief line or two about its manner of construction. In the case of the Lovejoy Bridge, it was recorded that it is "... to be built of square-sawn spruce, and of the Paddleford plan, at about a cost of $743.47".

Typically, covered bridges were put together by local builders, and like Maine-built ships, the skillful construction that went into them was more a matter of instinctive craftsmanship than engineering training. The designs used were those of professional bridge builders - Palmer, Burr, Town, Long and Howe - who held patents on different types of trusses. Their ideas went back to ancient principles. Two of the remaining covered bridges in Maine use a Long truss - Lowes Bridge and Robyville Bridge. Three use a Howe truss - Morse (no longer in existence), Watson Settlement and Babbs. The other five are of Paddleford construction (a modified Long truss) - Lovejoy, Hemlock, Bennett, Sunday River and Porter-Parsonsfield. Two of these, Hemlock and Porter-Parsonsfield, are strengthened with laminated wooden arches.

The first bridge across the Kennebec River at Augusta was a Palmer design; an open structure put up by a private company when Maine was still a district of Massachusetts. The covered bridge, which replaced it in 1819, is thought to be the first of its kind in the state. The last-built covered bridge which still survives is the Watson Settlement Bridge, built in 1911 in Littleton.

The two longest covered bridges in Maine, no longer in existence, were the Bangor-Brewer Bridge, a 792 foot structure across the Penobscot River built in 1846 at a cost of $60,000.; and the bridge at Norridgewock, a 600 foot structure across the Kennebec River.

Once there were a hundred and twenty covered bridges in the state of Maine, but fire, flood, ice, progress and the great freshet of 1896 have removed all but nine. Those attending SW4 will have an opportunity to view at least 3 of these on one of our suggested tours.


Factoid #9 - OK, since Shark Week 4 will take place in both NH and Maine, it's probably time that I give a couple of Factoids about NH here. NH has a land area of 9,351 sq. miles and a population of 1,235,786 .... ranking it as the 41st most populous state. It's capitol is Concord, and it's largest city is Manchester. New Hampshire is bordered by Maine, Massachusetts, and Vermont, plus Quebec, Canada to the north. It also has a short stretch of border on the Atlantic ocean.

It's nickname is the Granite State and it's motto is, "Live Free or Die". It was the 9th state in the U.S. New Hampshire has the distinction of being the only state without a state income tax or a general sales tax. It has three large rivers and the largest lake is Lake Winnipesaukee which has a surface area of 72 square miles, 253 islands, and a distance of 182 miles around the lake.


Factoid #10 Most people know New Hampshire for one or more of the following four things:

1. It has very aggressive pricing on liquor through it's state owned and operated liquor stores. Look around the parking lot of one of the stores located near a major highway, and you'll see plenty of license plates from Massachusetts, Maine, Connecticut, and other states. Many from surrounding states "stock up" their liquor cabinets in NH. You won't have to go far to find a liquor store as they are conveniently placed near the borders along any of it's major highways. For those coming north on I-95 the liquor store near the Mass./NH border has it's own exit. And there's also one located across the highway on the south bound lanes so you can fill your saddle bags on the way home!

2. Mt. Washington is the highest mountain in NH. It is part of the Presidential Range of the White Mountains that runs along the NH/Maine border. Mt. Washington rises 6,288' above sea level and has the highest wind speed ever recorded by man at 231 mph. The weather at the top of the top of the mountain is frequently referred to as "the worst weather on earth" due to the fact that it has winds that exceed hurricane force an average of 110 days per year. From November to April, these strong winds are likely to occur during two-thirds of the days. Mount Washington's official record low of −50 °F (−46 °C) was recorded on January 22, 1885. Add to that, an extremely high snow fall total and you can see that it's reputation is well deserved. The adventurous can reach the top via several hiking trails, the famous "Cog Railway" (http://www.thecog.com/), or by the Auto Road (http://mtwashingtonautoroad.com/). A SW4 day ride to the top is planned ... more about that as we get closer to SW4 dates.

3. N.H. is well known for it's "White Mountains" and it's mountain resort areas. The White Mountains are a mountain range covering about a quarter of the state of New Hampshire and a portion of western Maine. Part of the northern Appalachian Mountains, they are the most rugged mountains in New England. Most of the area is public land, including the White Mountain National Forest as well as a number of state parks. Mount Washington is one of a line of summits called the Presidential Range, many of which are named after U.S. presidents and other prominent Americans.

In addition, the White Mountains include several smaller groups including the Franconia Range, Sandwich Range, Carter-Moriah Range, Kinsman Range and Pilot Range. In all, there are forty-eight peaks over 4,000', known as a group as the Four-thousand footers. The Whites are known for their system of alpine huts for hikers, operated by the Appalachian Mountain Club. The Appalachian Trail crosses the area from southwest to northeast.



There are mountain resorts in this area for every budget. One of the most luxurious is the Mt. Washington Omni Resort. A grand masterpiece of Spanish Renaissance architecture, the Omni Mount Washington Hotel in New Hampshire's White Mountains was a two-year labor of love for 250 master craftsmen. Conceived by industrialist Joseph Stickney, this National Historic Landmark opened in 1902 and has been attracting generations of families ever since.

4. Laconia Bike Week - it's the oldest motorcycle rally in the U.S. It takes place in Laconia, and around the entire lakes region, as well as the mountain towns to the north. It takes place each year in June and this year was the 90th Anniversary of the event. Having attended all of the "Big 3" motorcycle rallies (including Daytona and Sturgis) several times, I think Laconia has the finest riding roads and scenery of them all.



Now we'll cover some attractions and roadside oddities starting with southern Maine and working our way north:

Factoid # 11 - The Kittery Trading Post - if you're an outdoor sportsman (or sportswoman) you want to visit the "Trading Post" in Kittery, ME. Maine's own version of the ultimate store for outdoor recreation enthusiasts. East to get to, less than a mile off I-95 (Maine Turnpike) it features everything needed for a day of kayaking, hunting, or fishing ... or a safari to some remote corner of the world. One of the recent attractions to the KTP is a full body mount of 2 moose who were found dead, locked in battle by their antlers. It's a stunningly large piece of taxidermy.



Kittery Trading Post
Address:301 US Hwy 1, Kittery, ME
Directions: I-95 exit 3, then a half-mile north on US Hwy 1. On the left.


Factoid #12 - The World’s Only Life-Size Chocolate Moose



Lenny Facts

Lenny is made of 1,700 pounds of the finest milk chocolate
Lenny was sculpted on-site in approximately four weeks
Lenny’s pond is white chocolate tinted with food coloring
Lenny was unveiled on July 1, 1997 and continues to delight visitors today!

Len Libby Candy
419 US Route One
Scarborough, Maine 04074




[B]Factoid #13 - "Eartha "/B] Located just a 20 minute ride north of Portland, ME. is the World's Largest Rotating Globe. It spins in the lobby of a venerable Maine-based family-owned mapping company. DeLorme (now evolved into a software company), put itself on the destination grid in 1998 with Eartha, a 41-ft. diameter globe.

CEO David DeLorme wanted something big to flag his company in the physical world -- so he designed the Worlds Largest Revolving and Rotating Globe. Eartha took two years to build. She would have been built faster, but halfway through her assembly DeLorme noticed a slight flaw. Eartha was torn down and reconstructed properly. The governor of Maine attached the last of her map panels, which included Maine, on July 23, 1998.

A year later, officials from Guinness World Records ran a tape measure over DeLorme's creation. Eartha, they learned, is just under 131 feet around, and 41 feet, one-and-a-half inches across her middle (DeLorme had guessed 42 feet).



Eartha mimics the earths movements inside a weatherproof three-story glass atrium at Delorme headquarters, mounted on a custom-designed, mechanized cantilever arm. Visitors can marvel at DeLorme's creation from three different observation levels, roughly at the South Pole, the Equator, and Greenland. Viewing Eartha from these up-close vantage points can leave you feeling like an ant, an astronaut, or a god, depending on your elevation.

Eartha is tilted on a 23.5 degree axis, mimicking the real Earth's angle. The surface is composed of 792 panels printed from a computerized database and incorporating shaded relief and depth info, roadways and cities. According to DeLorme, it's the largest Earth image ever created.

Directions: I-295 North from Portland take exit 17 (Rte. 1). Take a right off exit, then immediately turn right into Delorme headquarters.



We interrupt this list of attractions and roadside oddities for the following important announcement:


Factoid #14


The fun of attending SW4 just won't stop!!! It's mid-August and you're up here for SW4 and you're just not ready to head back home yet. If you like live kick-ass blues music we've got the answer for you. SW 4 ends on Friday the 15th. and the White Mountain Boogie and Blues Festival starts that day and runs through Sunday.

"Springer Todd" and I have attended it the last couple years and it's a blast. Very low key, held outdoors in a a natural amphitheater, surrounding by views of the White Mountains. Featuring some local craftsmen, locally made food, and some kick-ass national blues acts. Starts at 5:00 on Friday and runs through about that same time on Sunday. Three days of fun in the sun for a weekend pass fee of $60. Camping is extra.

Check it out on here: http://www.whitemountainboogie.com/

It was voted Best Blues Festival in the U.S. in 2012. Big name acts but relatively small crowds.

“Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming “Wow! What a Ride!” - HST

Last edited by Uncle Fuzzy; 11-03-2013 at 11:43 AM.
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post #3 of 63 (permalink) Old 09-21-2013, 05:16 PM
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Is it too early to sign up for this ride I may have to break off from the pack to get some shots of these bridges.

Great work on giving us some info each week also.. Nice read


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post #4 of 63 (permalink) Old 09-21-2013, 07:20 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Z-SHARK View Post
Is it too early to sign up for this ride I may have to break off from the pack to get some shots of these bridges.

Great work on giving us some info each week also.. Nice read
Thank you, we're doing our best to get members to get their reservations made and also feeding info to everyone to help keep members informed and interested. Having grown up in NH, lived in Maine, then Boulder, CO. area, then outside Chicago, and now back to Maine by choice, I know that Maine is almost like a foreign land to most, especially those who haven't been east of the big river very often. It wasn' that many years ago when I was working in SoCal for a week and someone asked me if we had indoor plumbing yet in Maine!!! I answered truthfully and said "most do".

No fear, if guided, the Covered Bridge and Waterfall Tour will stop numerous times for a few pics. You will also be able to do any of our numerous suggested rides as "self-guided", meaning we'll provide you with a map and directions, and a few suggested points of interest.

“Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming “Wow! What a Ride!” - HST
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post #5 of 63 (permalink) Old 09-21-2013, 09:09 PM
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Robyville Bridge, Corinth ME. Only shingled covered bridge in Maine.
5 miles from my house.


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post #6 of 63 (permalink) Old 09-22-2013, 05:50 AM
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Covered bridges are very cool.....
Thanks for the history lesson on these....


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post #7 of 63 (permalink) Old 09-29-2013, 12:25 PM Thread Starter
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OK, just posted this week's new Factoid (#9), plus one for next weekend (#10) as I plan to be away on a ride next weekend. So you get a '2-fer' today.

“Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming “Wow! What a Ride!” - HST
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post #8 of 63 (permalink) Old 09-29-2013, 01:19 PM
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Very interesting, looking forward to the bridges and seafood.

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post #9 of 63 (permalink) Old 09-29-2013, 07:55 PM
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Aggressive liquor pricing in NH. That's a great reason for NH to be the host hotel location. Thanks Northwoods! Now I need to figure out storage for the ride home. Would have never thought NH borders the Atlantic! I love learning new facts.

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post #10 of 63 (permalink) Old 09-29-2013, 11:34 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Hullhorr View Post
Aggressive liquor pricing in NH. That's a great reason for NH to be the host hotel location. Thanks Northwoods! Now I need to figure out storage for the ride home. Would have never thought NH borders the Atlantic! I love learning new facts.
I don't know how the NH prices compares to other parts of the country, but I know they're much better overall than the other New England states. And yes, NH does border on the ocean but only a short stretch of maybe 20 or 30 miles.


“Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming “Wow! What a Ride!” - HST
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