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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have 2 kids in college and I'm in need of some cash so I've decided to sell my 2012 FLTRX with 10,800 miles for 12k FIRM.

I bought this bike last year from the insurance auctions as a recovered theft with minor damage. I fixed it, got it inspected, have the reconstructed title in hand and I've enjoyed it very much but obligations force this sale. I bought the bike becuase it was gorgeous with only superficial damage. No frame, engine or suspension damage. It did have a popped key switch, bent bars- bent clutch lever - 1 broken mirror, cracked fairing, missing hard bags, bent oil cooler, broken shifter & broken rear peg. I have pics of how I got it if any truly interested party wants to see them. I replaced everything with genuine Harley parts and also upgraded some things as follows.

I put on:
Extended hard bags with the Harley lid Spoilers and lights
windvest 12" screen (not shown in the pics ).
had the inner fairnig painted Vivid black.
upgraded to JBL 6.5" speakers
added V&H slip-ons (not shown)
otherwise the bike is stock runs and rides great. All stock parts go with the bike and due to $ circumstances I need to sell- not trade.

No cruise, ABS or Anti-theft system.

feel free to ask questions or contact me off-line. I think this is a good deal with nothing to hide. Sorry the cell phone pics are all I had handy.
 

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Very nice looking bike with low mileage & definitely some nice extras but with a rebuilt title what options do you have when insuring it? Just curious
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Good question bereserker.

A lot of people don't understand the process and are scared away by it but here's how it works. I and my family have owned and driven these types of vehicles for over 20 years.

Once a vehicle has an incident (Major or minor) that requires an insurance company to pay-off the owner of that vehicle, the title becomes "Branded" as a "salvage title" and the vehicle can no longer be driven, registered or insured UNTIL- the cause for the "branding" is remedied. Once remedied, the vehicle is presented for inspection ( to the state police salvage inspection unit in my state (MA)) where they review the reason for the salvage title and verify that all the issues have been corrected. They inspect the vehicle, paperwork and receipts for the repairs and then certify that all the causes for the branding have been repaired and that the vehicle may then be re-registered for road use. At that point, a new title is issued and it becomes just like any other vehicle in that it can be registered, and insured normally- just like any other non-branded title vehicle.

This "new title", and any other title after that, will always carry a "branding" which is nothing more than a notation to alert future buyers that the vehicle had a prior incident that required an insurance company to pay-off and "salvage" the vehicle. The terms get misused quite a bit and can differ by state but in general- once the insurance company pays off on a vehicle- it will be branded as "Salvage". After the inspection and certification, the new title is still "branded" but they are no longer called "salvage" titles but "reconstructed/rebuilt" titles. After the inspection/certification- there's no difference in registration and insurance of that vehicle in any way. It costs the same, and the payouts are the same as a non- branded vehicle.

Last point- I've seen salvage vehicles that have so much damage they don't seem repairable, and I've seen a great many others where the damage is so minimal, I have to ask why they were salvaged at all. I typically buy only lightly damaged vehicles and I've been very blessed to have some great vehicles over the years at a fraction of what they'd cost otherwise. It's not for everyone- but for me- it's not scary as long as you feel everything is disclosed and above board. That's why I keep pictures of how I got the vehicles so people can see just what was damaged to begin with because that's what I'd want to see. In fact- below is how I got the bike home day 1 with one exception... I threw on my extended harley bags for the picture since I already had them in the garage.
 

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My sons 1997 Ford Probe GT was payed out by the insurance company because they claimed the price for original replacement parts were either too expensive or not available. It was the inner plastic wheel well
and the radiator over flow tank and a few other pieces on the passenger side front of the car. His car rubbed up against a wide flared pickup and the rear wheels damaged the passenger side fender. No structural
damage whatsoever. The insurance company cut me a check and let me keep the car. I repaired it with used and aftermarket parts and got a salvaged title. The inspector said he had never seen such a bogus
salvage. He could not believe the insurance company totaled the car. I sold it with no problems. I had the pictures to show how minimal the damage was.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
bless(),

I'm seeing it more and more. Sometimes I wonder if the owners had a friend at the insurance company salvage the vehicle because the damage is so minimal it doesn't make sense that the vehicle would have been salvaged. But more and more lightly damaged vehicles are showing up at auctions AND, prices are on the rise!

I've been keeping an eye out for a good late model pick-up to replace my old one (which was also a salvage). The prices people are paying for lightly damaged late model pick-ups is so close to retail, it just doesn't make sense. This might also contribute to why insurance companies appear to be totaling such light damage vehicles since they seem to be making back much of their payouts given the auction prices I'm seeing of late?
 

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Agree with all that has been written, but one point to to remember that a rebuilt/salvaged title does have an impact if another incident requires insurance to cover damages. I did significant research when my oldest son wanted to purchase a car with this designation. My insurance agent told me that the guidelines vary by company/state, but in my situation I could expect about 25% less value than a "clean" titled car. Fast forward about a year, three deer trying to commit suicide by car, one successfully, and one totaled vehicle. After evaluation by insurance company they offered about 20% less than what i considered fair value for a "clean" titled vehicle. After negotiation, and a good paperwork trail showing the repairs from the first incident were completed, we cam to an agreement somewhere in the 8% range. Considering he paid a lot less than the average value when he purchased he came out ok. I've heard stories that go the other way, but in our case it worked out. With proper documentation and consideration of $ I won't say never to salvaged titles, but it does require the proper amount of research and scrutiny. Financing said vehicles is a totally different beast.
 

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Try advertising on the Chopped Baggers forum also. A lot of guys over there looking for bikes to strip and customize most times prefer a used bike for a good price.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Agree with all that has been written, but one point to to remember that a rebuilt/salvaged title does have an impact if another incident requires insurance to cover damages. I did significant research when my oldest son wanted to purchase a car with this designation. My insurance agent told me that the guidelines vary by company/state, but in my situation I could expect about 25% less value than a "clean" titled car. Fast forward about a year, three deer trying to commit suicide by car, one successfully, and one totaled vehicle. After evaluation by insurance company they offered about 20% less than what i considered fair value for a "clean" titled vehicle. After negotiation, and a good paperwork trail showing the repairs from the first incident were completed, we cam to an agreement somewhere in the 8% range. Considering he paid a lot less than the average value when he purchased he came out ok. I've heard stories that go the other way, but in our case it worked out. With proper documentation and consideration of $ I won't say never to salvaged titles, but it does require the proper amount of research and scrutiny. Financing said vehicles is a totally different beast.
Thank you Bleachey- good info.

I have limited direct knowledge of your points but will share what my experiences have been for informational purposes- not to suggest any of your points are incorrect.

1) I always pay cash for my salvage vehicles so I've never encountered the financing issue myself. I have sold several vehicles with reconstructed titles, some of which I know the buyers had to secure financing for and I've never heard of them having a problem. To be fair- I don't know the types of loans they got but I know I've never been told of an issue. This is of course after the vehicles have been inspected and received reconstructed titles... it may be different if the vehicle still has a salvage title.

2) Thankfully- neither me nor anyone else in my family has ever had a total loss event with a reconstructed title vehicle. We have had collisions that required repair and the fact the vehicles were prior salvage had no bearing on the repair payouts. Also- I currently have 1 vehicle which is part of the VW TDI Emmision scandal where VW is buying the vehicle back. They specifically ask if the vehicle ever had a salvage title, and I of course answered honestly - "yes". To my knowledge, and speaking to others with similar non- reconstructed title vehicles, the amount VW is buying back my car for is not adjusted downward because of the salvage history.

3) The one area that hasn't been discussed and probably should be is- factory warranty. If you have a newer reconstructed title vehicle that is still covered by factory warranty- many dealers will try to shy away from honoring coverage. This can be a problem and it is one that I've encountered over the years. Again to be fair-I always tell them before hand the vehicle has a prior salvage history. I'm sure others may not disclose this but I don't want to come off as sleezy trying to sneak something by so I tell them up front. I'm not sure if the dealers computers would have this info- had I not told them- since I don't think they're linked to the insurance database by VIN but... not my style to try.

Now-my understanding after speaking to an official in DC about a problem I had several years ago was that dealers could NOT refuse warranty coverage on a reconstructed title vehicle even if their warranty policy specifically excluded vehicles with prior salvage history (and some manufacturers do have such wording in their official warranty policies). BUT- they will try and if your not well informed, they generally just try to deny coverage. My understanding though, is that they cannot legally deny coverage unless their is a reasonable tie between the salvage event and warranty coverage- but this is a grey area where there isn't much published guidance other than their own warranty policies.

The example the DC official used was: if a vehicle was a salvaged flood, the manufacturer could refuse to cover a failed electronic component that showed signs of water damage. But they shouldn't refuse to cover a failed tire on the same vehicle ... but they'll try. It's usually up to you to make the case that there's no reasonable direct link and they should honor the warranty... which in my case they did- but I had to fight for it. Also- factory recalls must be honored regardless of title status.

Just an FYi
 
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