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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a leaking fork seal on my 2015 RGS and planning to just rebuild both legs, watched some videos and seems straight forward until I read the service manual. Everyone online talks about measuring and filling with a certain amount of oil, but the manual says to fill almost full, pump the legs about 10 times and then use the shock oil level gauge to measure the oil. So that being said, what is the best way to do this? 24oz per leg or invest in the gauge?

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Discussion Starter #2
Okay, so the oil gauge tool is pretty inexpensive. I guess I just need to know which way will work best using the gauge or just measuring the amount of oil? Thanks
 

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On a rebuild, the fork will be dry, so you can just measure the fluid and pour it in. No need to account for the fluid that didn't drain out.
 

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On a rebuild, the fork will be dry, so you can just measure the fluid and pour it in. No need to account for the fluid that didn't drain out.
Makes sense, but my service manual doesn't give a total amount of fluid. It references two different fork types, one type says to start with 24 oz and then use the gauge the other (my style) says to fill almost full then use gauge. But neither gives an amount. So i guess i need that number from anyone that may know.

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The kayaba forks on my yz mx bike were level set. You had to fill almost full and put the lower leg almost through full stroke to purge air bubbles. Then drop the oil level from the top. Used a big syringe with a tube marked to the measurement.
 

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The kayaba forks on my yz mx bike were level set. You had to fill almost full and put the lower leg almost through full stroke to purge air bubbles. Then drop the oil level from the top. Used a big syringe with a tube marked to the measurement.
Yeah, that is how the service manual says to do it on mine as well.
 

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Not sure on rg forks but if there isnt enough oil when stoking the leg you expose the dampner to air and introduce more air in. Oil amount might not be as critical but on an mx 5mm difference between legs will deflect the front end one way.
 

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Not sure on rg forks but if there isnt enough oil when stoking the leg you expose the dampner to air and introduce more air in. Oil amount might not be as critical but on an mx 5mm difference between legs will deflect the front end one way.
Yeah I'm just gonna order up the oil gauge as well, better safe than sorry.

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I don't know about a 15, don't have that manual here. But 14's take 24oz. 11's take 24oz. And 18's take 24oz.

With the fork collapsed, pour about 10oz in, then stroke it nice and easy a few times to purge the air. If it uses emulators, you need to use the spring to hold them in place. After the air is purged, collapse the fork and pull the spring, if it was installed to hold the emulator down. Then pour the rest of the rest of the oil in . About 2 to 2 1/2 inches from the top of the collapsed tube. Same level, left to right. Ease the tube out, put the spring in, and cap it off.

As for slight differences creating an issue with the handling, that's bullshlt. I've seen people who were riding with one fork dry and they had no idea. Just though the front end was a little mushy. Some Harley forks use a cartridge on one side only, some split the dampen and compression valving left and right. What you wand to avoid is under filling, so as to let the upper valving be exposed to air. And over filling which causes a hydraulic lock.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I don't know about a 15, don't have that manual here. But 14's take 24oz. 11's take 24oz. And 18's take 24oz.



With the fork collapsed, pour about 10oz in, then stroke it nice and easy a few times to purge the air. If it uses emulators, you need to use the spring to hold them in place. After the air is purged, collapse the fork and pull the spring, if it was installed to hold the emulator down. Then pour the rest of the rest of the oil in . About 2 to 2 1/2 inches from the top of the collapsed tube. Same level, left to right. Ease the tube out, put the spring in, and cap it off.



As for slight differences creating an issue with the handling, that's bullshlt. I've seen people who were riding with one fork dry and they had no idea. Just though the front end was a little mushy. Some Harley forks use a cartridge on one side only, some split the dampen and compression valving left and right. What you wand to avoid is under filling, so as to let the upper valving be exposed to air. And over filling which causes a hydraulic lock.


Cool, thanks for the added info. That helps.


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