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It all depends on the individual & the circumstances. I’ve been in three collisions other drivers fault, all causing permanent injuries. Still riding but stopped for a while. After the first wreck I rebuilt the bike in a carport in winter while on crutches.
 

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but my brain stopped recording
I read your write up....just glad you're still with us!

Same here when I high-sided my Buell. I remember being in my garage and telling my wife I crashed and then walking into the ER. I had a pretty decent concussion. I don't remember anything else. Our brains are miraculous.

To the OP - you see a trend here that folks want to ride....it's just something we're wired to do once we feel the release from twisting the throttle. I see side-by-sides here in Arizona everywhere. It takes no skill to ride drive them and my buddy's very elderly mom drives one. A handlebar just demands a clear connection to the experience that a steering wheel and seatback can't replicate. It's completely cool if your buddy throws in the towel though. He had a good ride until now didn't he!! Support him either way.

I really like the advice above about getting him on a small bike if he needs a confidence builder! Really smart.
 

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Everyone is different but most feel better about getting back on the saddle after time. I have a buddy that went down and was messed up pretty bad. He too was a skilled rider that had ridden most of his life. He had 3 bikes in his garage and when I went to visit him in the hospital he was telling me he was done and that all the bikes would be going up for sale. A month after the accident the bikes still hadn't been listed and he was saying that he was still thinking about it. It took him over 8 months to recover enough to be able to get back on a bike. His first ride was very cautious and as each ride passed he would get a little more comfortable. When the pain from going down is still there it is hard to think about getting back on one but as time passes and the pain subsides he may feel better about getting back on the bike. If he does he may be a much more cautious rider than before and that's not saying he wasn't cautous before. Going down can cause the most skilled riders to change the way they ride and highten their awareness even more.
Yup, nothing like a crash (self inflicted or not) to make you a MUCH better rider. Idiots not included.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Thanks guys. All good advice. Advice from folks that have been there is definitely valuable. I much appreciate.
 

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My first big crash happened in '18 at Blackhawk Farms during a track day. Had a slight malfunction and lost my concentration, went off track and took a 70-80mph bump and slide. Bike was totaled. At the time of that crash I probably had 60-70k worth of riding experience over the prior 13 years of riding.

It took a while to want to get back on 2 wheels after that. All it took was throwing the leg back over the bike and simply not letting myself get off until I'd put on 20 miles. By the time I made it back home I felt like I was 90% of the way back. After that it was just a matter of relearning that it was OK to lean the bike over. It was OK to brake hard and ride aggressively (in appropriate circumstances, obviously).

In short, the best way is to get back in the saddle and simply ride. Muscle memory will handle most things, it's just a matter of overcoming the mental road blocks :)
 

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First and foremost hope your friend recovers well. I've been in a couple, but after 35 years of riding, the last one almost killed me. Took 8 months to recover. I did take a few years off from riding and swore I'd never ride again. Wrong, I couldn't get it out of my system. Riding is just part of me. I did eventually get back into riding, and hit it harder than I ever did before. That said...I did change a few thing's. First thing I did was go back to ground zero and took an MSF course. I then geared up head to toe...."Dress for the party in case you get invited". My attitude is different now as well. I ride from the perspective that I am invisible (which you practically are), I take nothing for granted I.E. that the motorist see's me, will yield, follow traffic rules etc....and lastly, all my riding is highway or state roads. No more city riding... way to many variables. Hope this helps out bit.
 

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I threw an SV650 into the weeds at T1.....always had fun at that track
It's definitely a fun track! I went off between 6 & 7. Quickshifter went haywire after I hit some bumps and started cutting power, I looked down, lost concentration and missed the kink/right hand while accelerating and went onto the grass. Had to choose between potentially hitting the trees or dumping it. Chose to dump it, and the rest is history as they say :)

Road America was downright terrifying, but I'd love to go back some day.
 

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You've received all the good advice already here. Let your friend come to his own terms, if it's in his blood, he'll be back on the saddle.

My only major slide was over 20 years ago and I was 6000km away from home on the other side of the country, as I was going coast to coast. I was pulling off a highway as I needed gas and I needed to hang a left after a long turn off the highway. I guess I hadn't slowed down enough from highways speeds and there had been rain on the road though it was now sunny. Anyways, I leaned left and next thing I knew, I was under the bike until it hit the gravel on the other side of the road, when the bike then flipped off me. Broke all my turn signals, ripped up my jeans and hurt my wrist, but I had no choice other than to climb back on that horse and get home. Taped the turn signals, changed my jeans at the end of the day, and rode another 7000km to get home. In a way, I'm glad that I had no choice at the time but to hop right back on the horse; I think if I had time at home to contemplate the situation, I may have heeded to more caution. Who knows?
 

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I have been lucky on the road. I raced for years, and did not ride on the road at all. When I did start riding on the road on a 1969 Dunstall Norton, it scared the crap out of me. Everyone was out to get me. On the track everyone is going the same way (mostly), and once you get to the higher classes the rest of the guys were usually good enough not to hit you if you made a mistake. Hitting another rider is poor traction, so we choose not to do so. After more than 40 years on the road, I have adopted rules that have kept me accident free. NO one sees me. I do not ever have the right of way if I can't see a drivers eyes looking at me. I very seldom ride in town. I don't ride with fools who have no skills. I am not as good as I used to be. If a person can do all this and still enjoy riding things usually will work out. I have friends who have been hurt badly and quit. It is such a shame to miss out on the riding for the rest of your life due to a few seconds of tragedy. I feel bad for the OP's friend. Tough decisions that everyone has to make for themselves. I hope I never have to.
 

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50 years of riding. In my younger foolish days. falling off was common and expected. I grew up and that stopped happening.
About 8 years ago 1 mile from the house took a deer that was air born through the faring and wind shield at 60 mph. It was not pretty knocked out in a ditch awhile. Broke collar bone real good , couple ribs.
ordered my new 2013 the next day. I knew I would ride. Not as much about tough guy stuff as it what I do. My family are all grown and doing fine. If I die today they will all be fine and secure.
Some find they need to build up to it. But don't let it take to long. The longer you stay off the harder it is. IMO.
We each make up our minds on what we will and will not do. If the only down side is I might get killed, That is not a reason to avoid much IMO.
 

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One of my best riding buddies had a bad close call last week. A cable tv crew left a low-slung cable hanging across the road. He saw it at the last moment and wisely slid under. Was doing about 40mph, bike flipped and is trashed (SG) and he was lucky with just some fairly minor road rash. But he could have easily not been so lucky. Thinks his helmet may have really saved him. He's a seasoned rider with no previous falls. Had over 100k on this last SG.
I'm curious from anyone who has been through a wreck before . . . any good advice on how to get the crash out of your head and get back in the saddle? Anything beyond climb back on that horse that threw you???
First I am glad your bud is ok.What your describing is not new.though it is new to him. After all these things happen to others not us.Insurance will replace the bike to a certain amount.however.This is one of the worst cases of negligence I have ever heard.Think about this the cable company is on the line for damages the customer especially if it’s municipal is co defendant. Once the lawyers are done and he’s on a new CVO a check in hand for new leathers, helmet and associated gear I’m sure he’ll be fine.I got cut off in a left turn thing on a wet road on a gorgeous ridged back in the day.Just sick I was a kid with no insurance and I was not hurt.Take a class was mentioned, excellent advice.There are some great tutorials on utube good to watch as winter settles in.On line window shop for a new scoot will get him back.Happy Thanksgiving
 

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Road America was downright terrifying, but I'd love to go back some day.
Road America.....Up the Hill on the Start Straight......Tuned Gixxer 6....heavy winds....crested over the slight hill and the front came up in full tits to tank tuck getting everything I could out of 5th.....I still break into a cold sweat when I thunk about it

I actually raced more Supermoto than I did Big Bikes at RA....fuckin Elkhorn Lake
 

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There is value that comes from taking pause after a close call or major wreck.

I will admit to being legitimately afraid of riding after two major wrecks over 26 years of paved riding (Ducati 996 and and Night Train). Each time I said I would never ride again, but I was back on a scooter before the bandages came off.

That is because I realized both times that the fear came from life being fragile, uncertain, and beyond my control to some degree.

In turn, that lead to remembering the importance of using the time I have on this earth the way I want ("sucking the marrow out of life," as Keates wrote) which led me right straight back into the saddle, but as a better rider.
 

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Road America.....Up the Hill on the Start Straight......Tuned Gixxer 6....heavy winds....crested over the slight hill and the front came up in full tits to tank tuck getting everything I could out of 5th.....I still break into a cold sweat when I thunk about it

I actually raced more Supermoto than I did Big Bikes at RA....fuckin Elkhorn Lake
The pucker factor is part of the fun. For me, it was backing into the first turn at the start of the Sacramento Mile in a group.
 

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it was backing into the first turn
Where I got my love for Supermoto.....nothing like scrubbing speed by backing it in.....and the overall DRAMATIC reduction in costs to race SM vs Sport Bikes...not to mention track fees as well - I miss it - My phone popped up a "timeline in pictures" this morning of Race Weekends.......I was not crying, YOU were crying........whatever okay, so I cried, there I said it...its winter and I miss racing....and having a body that can support the crashing that comes with racing.....ugh, I'm old
 
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