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Discussion Starter #1
Damnnnn! Went looking for a full face helmet that is Snell approved and all I could find are Chinese made Helmets. Who in their right mind would ever wear
a Helmet made in China? Even the HD helmets are made in China. When the F*** did this happen? HJC was a Korean Company, Not any more. All their helmets are now made in China. :mad:

Except for Shoei helmets that are hand painted in Japan for $500.00, I couldn't find anything made in the US.

Any Suggestions? In my 40 years of riding, I've seen too may heads through the windshield and on the pavement to wear a half shell. When you see the heads close up, it has a chilling affect. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #2
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To make buying a helmet in the U.S as confusing as possible, there are at least four standards a street motorcycle helmet can meet. The price of entry is the DOT standard, called FMVSS 218, that every street helmet sold here is legally required to pass. There is the European standard, called ECE 22-05, accepted by more than 50 countries. There's the BSI 6658 Type A standard from Britain. And lastly the Snell M2000/M2005 standard, a voluntary, private standard used primarily in the U.S. So every helmet for street use here must meet the DOT standard, and might or might not meet one of the others. Just by looking at the published requirements for each standard, you would guess a DOT-only helmet would be designed to be the softest, with an ECE helmet very close, then a BSI helmet, and then a Snell helmet.

The DOT standard has acquired something of a low-rent reputation for a number of reasons. First, it comes from the Gubmint, and the Gubmint, as we know, can't do anything right.

The DOT standard, like laws against, say, murder, also relies on the honor system; that is, there's only a penalty involved if you break it and sell a non-complying helmet and get caught. Manufacturers are required to do their own testing and then certify that their helmets meet the standards. But it also gives helmet designers quite a bit of freedom to design a helmet the way they think it ought to be for optimum overall protection. The question is, how well are those designers doing their job with all that freedom?

Suomy helmets sold under its own name conform to either the ECE or the BSI standard, but Suomy private-labels some helmets to brands such as Ducati that are built and certified to Snell. Some AGV models sold here are made to Snell standards, some to BSI. And a few Asian-made helmets are DOT-only. Among major manufacturers, Z1R (a subbrand of Parts Unlimited) and Fulmer Helmets sell DOT-only lids at the lower end of their pricing scales. You can also get 'em at Pep Boys under the Raider brand name.

In the last 10 to 15 years a number of Asian-made helmet brands such as HJC, Icon, KBC and Scorpion have entered the market to challenge the once-reigning Japanese leaders, Shoei and Arai.

These new brands offer helmets that look and feel pretty much like the Arais and Shoeis we were used to wearing and seeing on all the magazine covers, but at substantially lower prices. Problem is, a lower price, especially in a potentially life-saving piece of safety equipment, can do as much harm as good to a brand. There's always the perception lingering in a buyer's mind that a product can't be as good or protect as well if it doesn't cost as much.

So what can a lower-priced maker do to enhance its brand reputation? Get Snell certified. Whether they think a Snell helmet is actually better at head protection or not—and there's no shortage of debate on that subject—they're essentially over a barrel. If they don't get Snell certified, they give the perception their products are not as good as the others on the shelf. And their helmets will sell like Girls Gone Wild videos at a Village People concert.

In six months of researching this article, I spoke to many helmet company representatives. Some in civil tones. Some not so much. One, in particular, summed up the Snell-or-not quandary best. It was Phil Davy, brand manager for the very popular Icon helmets and riding gear. "When you build a helmet for this market, meeting the Snell standard is your first, second, third, fourth and fifth concern. You can then start designing a helmet that's safe," he said.

It is important to note that every one of Davy's Icon helmets is Snell certified. He's no fool.

Full Article

http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/gearbox/motorcycle_helmet_review/index.html
 

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Interesting information. So just for fun, how the he** do you find a country of origin manufacturing statement on a helmet? I just checked my Shoei Multi tech, and could find nothing anywhere. Being relatively ignorant, I just assumed it wa smade in Japan. Of course it was ~$450 when I bought it 3 years ago.

My summer 1/2 helmet, a Scorpion EXO100, it clearly stamped made in China, but it was <$100, so I guess I made a trade-off for cost and comfort (and potentially performance) but am willing to live with it when I'm already wearing just a half helmet.
 

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Impact helmets are made in the USA, according to Bill Simpson owner of Impact Racing Products. I have requested some info from them on standards, manufacturing and certifications.
This is the helment my son wears racing and it is pretty comfortable.
 

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I know Nolands used to be made in the US. It has been almost 3 years but I worked for GE Platics and provided raw material to Noland as well as Harley which they make the bags out of. Neither was my account but I know they were in the US because we had the accounts and not our sister company in Europe.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I know Nolands used to be made in the US. It has been almost 3 years but I worked for GE Platsics and provided raw material to Noland as well as Harley which they make the bags out of. Neither was my account but I know they were in the US because we had the accounts and not our sister company in Europe.
Nolands seem to be made in Italy, they are ECE certified which is suppose be better than Snell certification. Will probably get one of these or the new Snell2010 certifieds.

Thanks
 

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Scorpion Makes a great helmet at a reasonable price. love my full face. If you like the wind in your face but the protection of a full face when needed look into a full face that flips up in the front
 

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According to Simpson, some of their helmets are made in the USA. Just doesn't say if they get any from out of the US.

"Simpson Performance Products is headquartered in New Braunfels, TX
with more than 80,000 sq. feet of manufacturing and warehouse space.
Many of our restraints, helmets and flagship parachutes are manufactured and
tested right here. Simpson firesuits and crew uniforms are manufactured
outside of Los Angeles, CA in our 52,000 sq. foot facility. Simpson also
employs the largest customer service and sales team devoted solely to
servicing NASCAR customers of any racing safety supplier, based in the
heart of NASCAR country, Mooresville, NC.."

I don't know if by this statement they make other helmets in their other US plants or that they import some of their stuff.
 

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Shoei is made in Japan. Also, I purchased a replacement visor for my Shoei TZ-R helmet, the visor is stamped "Made in USA". Surprise.
 

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I haven't checked in a few years, but the Fulmer I wear the most was made in the USA. I have a new one I bought last year. When I get home I'll check the tags inside to see if they still are. They are exceptional helmets for the money but must be bought at a dealer as they don't sell online.
 

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Nice helmet
Made in: Taiwan
•The Fulmer M1 Modus motorcycle helmet was given a five-star rating by SHARP, making it one of the safest motorcycle helmets on the market. These helmets are also incredibly cheap in comparison with other motorcycle helmets of their safety caliber. They have a visor to protect the rider's face, and when this is down, the helmet becomes incredibly stiff. This means that it will withstand a large amount of impact when the visor is in place, which it always should be when the motorcycle rider is moving on his bike. While it is not an elegantly designed helmet, it effectively protects riders who end up in accidents


Read more: The Best Safety Rated Motorcycle Helmets | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/list_7335488_safety-rated-motorcycle-helmets.html#ixzz1AAsMrDVt
 

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Seer helmets are made in the USA.

The company caters mostly to the law enforcement community. They will build and custom paint a helmet to your specifications. Their newest helmet, the S1607 is made of fiberglass and Kevlar. The helmet is certified to FVMSS 218, DOT and Snell 2005. They sell between $300 and $400 depending on the paint customization. http://www.superseer.com
 

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The OP was looking for full face helmets, so Seer is out of the equation. Some of the Simson/Impacts are USA, but very few. I've just about given up on finding USA made full face, and now looking at either Nolan(Italy) or Schuberth(Germany). I tried on the new Schuberth C3 flip up, and it was extremely well made, and very comfortable. Size runs on the small side. I normally wear an XL in every brand of helmet I've ever had on my head. I had to go to a XXL in the C3. They also make a traditional full face(I think it's a S2), which is what I'm leaning towards, as I'm leery of the flip ups eventually developing mechanical slop, and starting to whistle/rattle. I like as few moving parts as possible. Sure is frustrating, trying to by American. Sad state of affairs.

Jeff
 

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arai

I think the arai's are the best. They are the only ones in round, regular, and long profile shapes. They feel the lightest, which should reduce the chance of breaking your neck. There is no difference in relative mortality between helmet and non helmet states. Helmet laws work by discouraging ridership, thus reducing losses by auto insurance cos. The original article from Forbes is available online on harleyhelp(I think). You can have it light, strong, or cheap: choose two. How much did you spend on your bike?
 

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The last Bell I had was made in USA, I don't know if they still are.
 

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Nolan's are made in Italy, and the Schuberth I wear, is made in Germany. No realistic US alternatives, that I'm aware of. Simpson still makes some of their helmets in the US, but are more oriented to racing, and just don't have the ergonomics/features for street use. Sadly, they have also started producing some of their lids overseas as well.

Jeff
 
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