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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
OK, all purists: stop reading this.
Over the years I had collected a large amount of Harley parts and every time I looked at them I thought the same thing - I should build something cool from that stuff sometime. I had enough to build a bike and a
half.... So I decided to piece together a Road Glide style bike. Not that I really needed another bike and it wasn't exactly the right time to throw money at yet another project. The plan that started to develop in
my brain wasn't based on reasonable things either so, in short - the perfect project. :)
I had this 1981 FLT Harley frame sitting in the garage for years. It was straight in the front section but had a bad rear section. Since I have a title to it I wanted to save it and build a new bike from it.

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I fished a 2010 touring frame out of the trash container at a friendly H-D dealership. The neck had been cut off and sent to the MoCo so they could send a new frame with the same VIN.

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The question was if I could create one good frame from the parts I had. I took measurements and compared angles etc. and came to the conclusion that those frames haven't changed at all regarding their
geometry and the main mounting points! The differences are in fact so small that a lot of things are interchangeable with easy modifications. So I went for it. I cut off the neck of the 1981 frame and the 2010
frame was tacked to a perfectly level welding table to make sure it wouldn't move. Then cuts were made to the down tubes so the 1981 down tubes would slide in. We built a jig to make sure the frame parts lined up properly. After spending a good hour on adjusting things everything looked good and we tacked the frame sections together.

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The outer diameter of the 1981 down tubes coincides with the inner diameter of the 2010 down tubes so the old section fit right into the new. The backbone square tube is the same size. Only the rolled edges are a little more pronounced. Easy to blend but that portion is covered by the tank anyway.

 

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Discussion Starter #2
The neck needed some minor modification to accommodate a 2003 lock set I had so I replaced the old fork lock tab with one I had cut off a 2006 neck.

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The tank mount didn't look too good so that got beefed up:

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More material added to the frame tubes and a little blending....

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Discussion Starter #4
The frame is all done and sand blasted:

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To me a freshly powder coated frame is a thing of beauty!

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Discussion Starter #8
So this '81, '06, '09 and 2010 frame was ready for motor and transmission. I had a complete setup from a 2009 salvage bike with paperwork and a ton of other important parts. It was very filthy but only had
9,000 miles on it. Cleaned up very nice and installation was unconventional but very efficient:

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I laid the whole thing on it's right side and lowered the frame over it. Took a little wiggling around but after just a few minutes everything was lined up and loosely bolted together:

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Flipped it back up with the swing arm in place. Making progress!


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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Since my pile of parts consisted of stuff from about 3 decades in conditions ranging from new to fucked up I sent most metal parts thru the Great Equalizer (a.k.a. black powder coat). Same was true for most of the
body parts - only you can't powder coat plastic.
Next things to install:
- front end
- wiring harness
- brakes including ABS

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I used a set of leftover triple trees from a '03 FLHR, got new tubes and put Progressive Suspension cartridge internals in. Those cartridge internals are not cheap but it's a great upgrade that improves handling quite a
bit. Fork lowers were new take-offs from a 2012 FLTR.

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The wiring harness came from an Ultra Classic and needed to get modified because speedo and tach are in a different location. Not too difficult but I triple-checked every wire.
There are about a million wires in that harness it seems....
 

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I have always envied people that can work metal into things of beauty. Keep up the posts...
X2 Can't wait to see the finished project! Definitely subscribing to this thread.
 

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Nice work. Subscribed.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Once that thing started looking like a motorcycle it was time to undo some of that - the motor was bone stock and I won't have that. I took the topend off and sent it off to the machine shop. Jugs bored out
to 107cui and heads flowed and ported.

I decided to give S&S 570 Easy Start cams a shot. My other bike has a 131cui Jim's motor in it and every time it kicks back when I start it starter pinion gear and starter gear on the hub lose teeth. Happens because the manual compression releases close before the motor really fires up so if it does not start that moment it will kick back like a mule. Easy Start cams will prevent that because they have a mechanism that keeps the exhaust valves open until the motor revs to idling or higher rpms. Centrifugal force controls that. We'll see how durable they are, I'll be listening.

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At that point I couldn't resist to try out if the 2009 engine guard would go on at all. The top mounting bracket is 1981 and the two bottom ones go onto the 2010 portions of the frame. Believe it or not - it was a perfect fit! That NEVER happens. Ever!

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Dewey called to tell me that heads and jugs are finished so I went to pick them up. He cuts grooves into the surface that sits inside the compression chamber. This supposedly reduces detonation issues. I have
no experience with it but I hear it works. After putting about 5,000 miles on it I can say that the bike pulls nicely. I did not go for maximum HP and torque on this bike. Reliability is more important on this bike than top hp.

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