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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi all,

i was looking to do a bolt-in cam swap in my 103". previously i used a shop when i had 254E cams put in. my uncle who has been building race cars and harleys for 30+ years shied me away from doing it myself last time and got my nervous.

how hard of a job is this? once complete i would take it to get a pro tune (i have TTS). i'm familiar wrenching. have swapped out numerous car engines, done lots of bike wrenching, owned tons of bikes, do all my own maintenance, etc. so i know how to turn wrenches, torque things properly, and read a manual lol

my plan was to save the cash i would pay someone else for labor on good tools. that way in the future i can do it again or for friends.

i don't plan on pulling the heads. will just be bolting in cams and using adjustable push-rods.

for those that might want to know i wanted to try the t-man torqster 555.

also, what special tools would i need?
 

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Do it yourself and save. You are more than qualified. A Saturday is all it will take. A good friend to help rotate the back wheel to find TDC on your pistons is also a good help.

Service Manual for your bike, torque wrenches in in-lbs and ft-lbs set of good quality deep sockets and allen sockets.

I highly recommend a lift table, makes it so much easier to work at a good height. If you don't have a lift table then a good wheel chock like a Condor along with a good jack and a few 2 x 6 blocks will go a long way.

Georges' Tools or Jims' Tools or others. I have Georges' tools to rent but will only ship them across Canada not to the states, too expensive and too much paperwork to ship them back and forth across the international border. There are a couple on here from the U.S. that will rent you their tools.

Save the money not spent on labor for gas, you'll need that after you change the cams and maybe a little $ for floss to get the bugs out of your teeth because of the perpetual smile everytime you ride.

You can do it!

Calgaryglide
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
haha yeah i know about shipping to canada. sold a few parts on this forum that were headed to canada...lost my shirt!

so for special tools...this is the list i'm compiling

- oil pump alignment
- inner cam bearing puller
- inner cam bearing installer
- cam chain tensioner tool

any others?



Do it yourself and save. You are more than qualified. A Saturday is all it will take. A good friend to help rotate the back wheel to find TDC on your pistons is also a good help.

Service Manual for your bike, torque wrenches in in-lbs and ft-lbs set of good quality deep sockets and allen sockets.

I highly recommend a lift table, makes it so much easier to work at a good height. If you don't have a lift table then a good wheel chock like a Condor along with a good jack and a few 2 x 6 blocks will go a long way.

Georges' Tools or Jims' Tools or others. I have Georges' tools to rent but will only ship them across Canada not to the states, too expensive and too much paperwork to ship them back and forth across the international border. There are a couple on here from the U.S. that will rent you their tools.

Save the money not spent on labor for gas, you'll need that after you change the cams and maybe a little $ for floss to get the bugs out of your teeth because of the perpetual smile everytime you ride.

You can do it!

Calgaryglide
 

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Other than a cam bearing puller there aren't any special tools needed you can use your old cam to drive the new cam bearings in with,as long as you have a good set of bolt cutters to remove the stock pushrods standard tools are all that is needed,you need a manual if you don't have one.
 

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haha yeah i know about shipping to canada. sold a few parts on this forum that were headed to canada...lost my shirt!

so for special tools...this is the list i'm compiling

- oil pump alignment
- inner cam bearing puller
- inner cam bearing installer
- cam chain tensioner tool

any others?
You dont need a oil pump aligment tool just follow the manual on how to align the oil pump,if you are working on a late model 103 you will not need a tensioner tool either,they simply bolt onto the cam plate,i would recommend the Axtel oil bleedoff upgrade kit,i just installed cams to mine and i installed the Axtel kit to mine.
 

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I had the same debate when I went with cams in my Glide. I had never done cams in a Twin Cam before so it had me asking the same question you are. Just do it yourself, learn something while you are at it and enjoy the huge smirk on your face when you ride it the first time and feel how your new cams just woke up your engine. I picked up the bearing installer/puller and cam/crank locking tool from Amazon made by a company called Heartland Tool. Hope this helps a little. Good luck with your cam project!
 

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hi all,

i was looking to do a bolt-in cam swap in my 103". previously i used a shop when i had 254E cams put in. my uncle who has been building race cars and harleys for 30+ years shied me away from doing it myself last time and got my nervous.

how hard of a job is this? once complete i would take it to get a pro tune (i have TTS). i'm familiar wrenching. have swapped out numerous car engines, done lots of bike wrenching, owned tons of bikes, do all my own maintenance, etc. so i know how to turn wrenches, torque things properly, and read a manual lol

my plan was to save the cash i would pay someone else for labor on good tools. that way in the future i can do it again or for friends.

i don't plan on pulling the heads. will just be bolting in cams and using adjustable push-rods.

for those that might want to know i wanted to try the t-man torqster 555.

also, what special tools would i need?
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5IWtJW8f7xg

He walks you right through it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks for the link, i watched the JP cycles video earlier. this def looks very easy.

another question for the experts. my bike is tuned for these 254E cams and it has a TTS tuner. is it safe to start it and drive it until i am able to dyno tune it again? i don't think i'd be driving it long before tuning, just around the block a few times.


 

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I had the same debate when I went with cams in my Glide. I had never done cams in a Twin Cam before so it had me asking the same question you are. Just do it yourself, learn something while you are at it and enjoy the huge smirk on your face when you ride it the first time and feel how your new cams just woke up your engine. I picked up the bearing installer/puller and cam/crank locking tool from Amazon made by a company called Heartland Tool. Hope this helps a little. Good luck with your cam project!
You are right about the cam lock tool,forgot about it.:eek:
 

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You can do it! I have watched the Fuel Moto and J&P cam install video so many times I can do it in my dreams. Lol

I just ordered Drago's 580 cams and will do install in 3 weeks using the video and manual as well as the help of MJSDOUBLE and SharkNoseScott.

Looking forward to the challenge.
 

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I just watched the fuel moto videos. Dayum:eek: with the right toolset and mindset, I think this is something I could do...once I'm out of warranty:p. Of course, I might as well have the heads worked since it'll be off anyway, right? The question is; 107 or 117 for my little heavy hotrod touring bike? Better yet, I suppose I could lose 50lbs of personal body fat and just go with the 107 for an easier R&R and get better power-to-weight ratio, yes?:D
 

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Specialty tools.
2 paper clips and big rubber bands - hook the bands over the rocker cover bolts and open out the end of the paper clip and hook under the push rod covers to hold them up while you adjust the push rods.

The handles off a big spring binder - push the lifters up and use the wire spring handles to 'rock' the liters away from each other in there bores, that will hold em up and out of the way.

Tread chasers/cleaners - real important to clean the old loctite off the treads.

And after this you won't even be scared to do a head swap :cool:
 

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Most anyone with mechanical common sense, simple hand tools, can perform this very easy job.
Not like setting the crank end play on a flat-bearing Panhead, or building a 4 5/8" XL stroker, where extensive crancase/cylinder work is needed.
Installation of T/C cams is about as hard as watching grass grow.:)
Scott
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
so decided to go for it and do some mild headwork while i was at it. as i pulled the front head i noticed the cylinder was loose. is this normal? i'm guessing no. the other rear cylinder stayed tight when i pulled the head. any ideas?

bike ran like a top prior to tear down. about 20k or so on the clock, heads have never been off...

i'm thinking the cylinder studs got loosened when i pulled the head bolts.

http://youtu.be/vqcS3notxG8
 

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That is nothing to worry about! The cylinder is just sitting on the lower case and will tighten up when the head bolts are torqued down.
The cylinder studs should be flush with the top of the cylinder but if you have a question if the studs backed out you can lift the cylinder a little to check the cylinder studs.
Make sure the piston is at the top of the cylinder then lift the cylinder a couple of inches making sure you don't pull it off the piston. Now you can see the base of the cylinder studs where the studs screw into the crankcase. The cylinder studs have a ring molded in the stud and that ring should be seated on the crankcase, if the ring is not seated on the crankcase then the stud backed out some when you removed the head bolts and the cylinder would have to be removed to re-seat the cylinder studs. The cylinder studs only require 14 to 17 ft lbs of torque.
Chances are your cylinder studs did not back out any.

DO NOT OVER TORQUE THE HEAD BOLTS IT WILL PULL THE CYLINDER STUDS!

If your torquing the head bolts and you can't get the head bolt to torque down then the cylinder stud is pulled and a R&R of the cylinder stud is needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
whew awesome and thanks for the write-up. makes sense how they do it now that i think about it. i will check tonight to make sure the studs are down.

and always good to send reminders not to over-torque. i have learned that the hard way many times and am very careful now. i think it is important to try to develop a sense for feel when torquing instead of just relying on a click. i know there have been times where i set the wrong torque or the wrench just didn't click and i snapped bolts. live and learn...

thanks for the info though, really great write-up and solid advice

That is nothing to worry about! The cylinder is just sitting on the lower case and will tighten up when the head bolts are torqued down.
The cylinder studs should be flush with the top of the cylinder but if you have a question if the studs backed out you can lift the cylinder a little to check the cylinder studs.
Make sure the piston is at the top of the cylinder then lift the cylinder a couple of inches making sure you don't pull it off the piston. Now you can see the base of the cylinder studs where the studs screw into the crankcase. The cylinder studs have a ring molded in the stud and that ring should be seated on the crankcase, if the ring is not seated on the crankcase then the stud backed out some when you removed the head bolts and the cylinder would have to be removed to re-seat the cylinder studs. The cylinder studs only require 14 to 17 ft lbs of torque.
Chances are your cylinder studs did not back out any.

DO NOT OVER TORQUE THE HEAD BOLTS IT WILL PULL THE CYLINDER STUDS!

If your torquing the head bolts and you can't get the head bolt to torque down then the cylinder stud is pulled and a R&R of the cylinder stud is needed.
 
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