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Discussion Starter #1
If I'm correct, RMS power is the average continuous power used. And peak is just that. But, my question is this. I see some speakers that advertise 6-60RMS, and some others that advertise 15-100RMS. Just wondering what the difference is. Thanks!
 

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If I'm correct, RMS power is the average continuous power used. And peak is just that. But, my question is this. I see some speakers that advertise 6-60RMS, and some others that advertise 15-100RMS. Just wondering what the difference is. Thanks!
RMS stands for Root Mean Squared and is equal to .707 times the peak power.
So a speaker that is rated at say 70 watts rms would handle a peak of 100 watts.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The higher the RMS the better right?
 

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Maybe, the Higher the rms sometimes mean the less efficient the speaker. In other words it can handle lots of power but it might just dissipate the higher power as heat instead of sound. You want the most efficient speaker you can find that is rated in dB per 1 watt. If it also has a high rms rating that would give you the most volume. That means you could run reasonable amounts of power, get higher sound levels and have less chance of blowing the speakers.
 

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I think I'm following you on this. Thanks! I'm running some Polk DX1651's right now, but have been considering pulling the trigger on some Kappa's or some more Polks. The MM651UM's. I've heard good things about both of those. An amp is in the future as well.
 
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