Road Glide banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
893 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Would someone explain to me how the compensator actually works. I would have thought a simple sprocket attached to the output shaft would provide the power to drive the primary chain. But with reference to compensators "going bad", pitted ramps, etc. Clearly there is more to it than a sprocket to drive a chain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
893 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Dude - Thanks for the explanation and the link - now it makes sense
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,376 Posts
As said above, it's a cushion. It absorbs the torque pulses and then releases them. The energy is stored in the plate springs.

It's not so much for protecting the chain as it is for protecting the transmission gears. Automobiles use coil springs in the clutch hub for the same reason.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,687 Posts
The simple sprocket is the way I went ~ Vulcanworks and love it. I have replaced 7 compensators on two bikes in 4 years with a combined 120k on the clocks ~ this was ridiculous. The vulcanworks sprocket will probably never need replacement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,687 Posts
Is the vulcan gear (part number if you have) all that you changed?
34T Motor Sprocket, 06+ Dynas, 07+ Softails, Dressers

For 2006+ Dynas, 2007+ Softails, Dressers, T/C-96 “A” & “B” Motors

Solid sprocket conversion to eliminate compensator assembly.
Eliminates slippage and noise from compensator.

Made from 4140 Tool Steel & Heat Treated.

Part# 4513

http://vulcanworks.net/Motor-Sprockets-amp-Shaft-Extensions-orderby0-p-1-c-6.html

Many other components have been replaced. The only way to eliminate compensator failure is to eliminate it. I do not lug the bike and don't "shock the crank". This has been a welcome addition to a RG that is ridden 40+k per year.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top