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See post #6. The OP changed out parts with His Buddy and still no spark.
Mike U.
He never said that he had tested the fuel system just that the fuel pump ran. Still no spark after switching out parts.....well that's a terrible way to diagnose things one, two they need to test the voltage output of the sensors associated with the ignition system if that is suspect. Testing the resistance of the coils and wires, and also seeing if the coils are getting the proper voltage. These tests would be tough to do without a breakout box but not impossible.
 

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I'm just thinking out loud here - But the damaged crank position sensor harness theory (as mentioned above) makes the most sense to me, given what the bike is doing.

Maybe giving it a really good looking at is worth a shot?
I guess it's plausible to damage the crank sensor while replacing the compensator but you'd have to be really careless about it lol. I definitely agree though, the crank sensor would be what tells the coils to fire
 
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He never said that he had tested the fuel system just that the fuel pump ran. Still no spark after switching out parts.....well that's a terrible way to diagnose things one, two they need to test the voltage output of the sensors associated with the ignition system if that is suspect. Testing the resistance of the coils and wires, and also seeing if the coils are getting the proper voltage. These tests would be tough to do without a breakout box but not impossible.
I agree but the OP stated that the spark plugs were wet with fuel but would not spark.
It would be correct to check the wiring at the Crank Sensor but if the Ignition Switch is not functioning properly that could also be the culprit.
Mike U.
 

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I guess it's plausible to damage the crank sensor while replacing the compensator but you'd have to be really careless about it lol. I definitely agree though, the crank sensor would be what tells the coils to fire
I was thinking more about the harness/wiring going to the crank sensor, since he's already eliminated it by testing on his buddy's bike.

Here's the thing, I'm basically playing a mental game of 'What is the best/easiest/only way to fuck this up...if I was trying to?' ...While using only the information given in the story.

No mention has been made of any DTC's, so either there are none, or it just hasn't been checked yet - Clarifying that would help us, help him, a lot (hint to OP..).

So problem area 1:
He changed the compensator, but no mention was made of how much disassembly was done to get that accomplished, so if we take the liberty of assuming the worse ...(solely for diagnostic purposes)... The the wiring could potentially have been exposed to a bit of tug/pinch/pull.
His ckp sensor worked on his buddy's bike but not his. Could the wiring going to it have peen pulled, strained, pinched ... Or as Thermo put it "Murphy'ed"? Under the circumstances, it's damn sure worth exploring to see if a pin backed out, etc..

Problem area 2:
He mentioned that there was power at the coil on the Y/GN wire, and that the plugs were wet. Since they are - according to the wiring diagram - powered by the same wire/conductor path - Chances are good that the problem isn't there.

His coil worked on his buddy's bike, but not on his. So if he tested the power "with a probe" are we talking about the classic old school - stab into the wire with a test light - style probe? That wouldn't tell us if the wires got pulled out of the plug...just enough.

The battery is heavy and it's a bit awkward getting it in-and-out the first few times. So if it managed to slip and drop in on the wiring, it could - conceivably - have tugged on the coil wires just enough to back out a pin - and the probe test could easily miss that.

Then there is the ECM, was it disconnected during the replacement, or just tucked off to the side - Either way, how well is its connectors seated now?

To be honest, my money is on option 2 ...(pin on coil plug backed out)... Because that really is about the easiest way to end up here that I can think of.
 
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If everything worked properly before the OP replaced the Compensator and Battery, then I would look there first to ensure nothing was inadvertently disconnected or broken.
After verifying that the work was completed properly I would check the wiring to and from the CKP to make sure that was not the reason for no spark.
Hopefully, the OP will return to inform Us of His progress.
Best of Luck @Dugweed.
Mike U.
 

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Okay, I'm like totally with you here, but since we're basically "bench racing" this diagnostic...

After verifying that the work was completed properly I would check the wiring to and from the CKP to make sure that was not the reason for no spark.
You just reminded me of something that I forgot to ponder earlier. OP mentioned that the "plugs are wet", and since the only way they can get wet is if the injectors are firing (which is the same circuit as power to the coil). Wouldn't that tend to imply that the crank position sensor is - at least - trying to do something?

I'm just thinking out loud (again), but if the ckps was totally dead, the plugs should be bone dry. And if it was flaking-out (since it's a 2 wire all or none type unit) the engine should be (misfiring) kicking/popping/backfiring like an old Evo with a sheared alignment on the advance unit...instead of not even trying.
 

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Both the injectors and the coil require ground to work and the ground is pulsed at different times to each component, based on sensor pulses to the ECM. This is why I suggested OP look for the pulsed ground at the coil. If it is there, the coil should be firing. If both are present likely bad coil but need to check a few other items between coil and plug before making the call.

Given OP isn’t responding, perhaps problem solved…
 

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I was thinking more about the harness/wiring going to the crank sensor, since he's already eliminated it by testing on his buddy's bike.

Here's the thing, I'm basically playing a mental game of 'What is the best/easiest/only way to fuck this up...if I was trying to?' ...While using only the information given in the story.

No mention has been made of any DTC's, so either there are none, or it just hasn't been checked yet - Clarifying that would help us, help him, a lot (hint to OP..).

So problem area 1:
He changed the compensator, but no mention was made of how much disassembly was done to get that accomplished, so if we take the liberty of assuming the worse ...(solely for diagnostic purposes)... The the wiring could potentially have been exposed to a bit of tug/pinch/pull.
His ckp sensor worked on his buddy's bike but not his. Could the wiring going to it have peen pulled, strained, pinched ... Or as Thermo put it "Murphy'ed"? Under the circumstances, it's damn sure worth exploring to see if a pin backed out, etc..

Problem area 2:
He mentioned that there was power at the coil on the Y/GN wire, and that the plugs were wet. Since they are - according to the wiring diagram - powered by the same wire/conductor path - Chances are good that the problem isn't there.

His coil worked on his buddy's bike, but not on his. So if he tested the power "with a probe" are we talking about the classic old school - stab into the wire with a test light - style probe? That wouldn't tell us if the wires got pulled out of the plug...just enough.

The battery is heavy and it's a bit awkward getting it in-and-out the first few times. So if it managed to slip and drop in on the wiring, it could - conceivably - have tugged on the coil wires just enough to back out a pin - and the probe test could easily miss that.

Then there is the ECM, was it disconnected during the replacement, or just tucked off to the side - Either way, how well is its connectors seated now?

To be honest, my money is on option 2 ...(pin on coil plug backed out)... Because that really is about the easiest way to end up here that I can think of.
Who knows. He said the coil was getting power at the connector which would indicate a bad coil but he supposedly swapped that with his buddy's parts and still no spark. There seems to be more to this story than he's telling us or he has no clue what he's doing
 
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I agree but the OP stated that the spark plugs were wet with fuel but would not spark.
It would be correct to check the wiring at the Crank Sensor but if the Ignition Switch is not functioning properly that could also be the culprit.
Mike U.
How would the ignition switch have anything to do with it? He is able to crank. More likely than not, a weak battery is to blame. You need a minimum of 12 VDC to even run a fuel injection bike. He hasn't mentioned anything about what his battery voltage is or was. Just that it was new. All electrical problems begin at the battery then you work systematically towards what think the problem is.

Problem area 2:
He mentioned that there was power at the coil on the Y/GN wire, and that the plugs were wet. Since they are - according to the wiring diagram - powered by the same wire/conductor path - Chances are good that the problem isn't there.

His coil worked on his buddy's bike, but not on his. So if he tested the power "with a probe" are we talking about the classic old school - stab into the wire with a test light - style probe? That wouldn't tell us if the wires got pulled out of the plug...just enough.
Of course, you would have power at the coils. It provides momentary power when the key is turn on and you should read battery voltage momentarily. You'll need a noid light to see if the coils are physically firing, you could also you a test light while back probing the connecter. poking wires with test lights is a terrible idea. You can build back probes and probe at the connectors.

I maintain that switching of parts tells us absolutely nothing.
 

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How would the ignition switch have anything to do with it? He is able to crank. More likely than not, a weak battery is to blame. You need a minimum of 12 VDC to even run a fuel injection bike. He hasn't mentioned anything about what his battery voltage is or was. Just that it was new. All electrical problems begin at the battery then you work systematically towards what think the problem is.



Of course, you would have power at the coils. It provides momentary power when the key is turn on and you should read battery voltage momentarily. You'll need a noid light to see if the coils are physically firing, you could also you a test light while back probing the connecter. poking wires with test lights is a terrible idea. You can build back probes and probe at the connectors.

I maintain that switching of parts tells us absolutely nothing.
Something isn't adding up with the thread. He joined a few days ago and all of his posts are in this thread and we haven't heard anything from him since. Either there's more to this story he's not telling us or he has no clue what he's doing.
 
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