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Discussion Starter #1
Think my recent audio upgrade with amp has overworked my old gear. Got home from Sturgis and battery was dead. Had it tested (1 month old) and Stealer ship said good. Fully charged battery just drains on short ride. Decided rather than screw around trying to figure out what exactly wrong I would just change it all out. (Have read some good things on here about Cycle Electric). Spent $400 bucks that could have bought a hell of a lot of beer. Anyway stuff came yesterday and just pulled the primary chain case cover tonight. I'll post my progress here over next few days (ff and on again bike time) in case it helps anyone later (or I get in troube and anyone can help me.. more likely). Im going to fabricate ny own rotor puller cause no way im spending $125 bucks for that! PS. My buddy, previous owner of my bike had all the service done regularly at the dealership and I'm glad for it (and I know my bike's older and service issues catching up).. But seriously. How can anyone afford that?! I shudder to think what this seemingly novice upgrade would cost with the "pros."? (Thank God for this site & YouTube).
 

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I've got a 2012 with an intermittent low voltage / battery light issue. I've been looking at the 50amp Cycle Electric 3 phase setup. I'll be watching your progress. Good luck
 

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I did all Cycle Electric components on my '12 when I put in the 124. Rock Solid. CE makes great stuff.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Okay down to rotor. Made my own tool to lock sprockets so I could remove front nut by cutting 8 incheck piece of 3/4" electrical conduit and hammered ends oval so both ends could slip over tooths on both chain rings at each end, thus jamming sprocket from moving. Took a hell of a lot of force to remove front nut.. like breaker bar and 4 foot extension of steel pipe! Threads were normal, left loose. And socket size 1.5". On the back clutch assembly the inner nut (you have to take off stuff to get to it, see vid below) takes a 1 and 3/8" socket and is reverse (right loose). I strapped down brake to rear tire to keep from moving and came off a lot easier than front. Anyway this series of video a big help https://youtu.be/GTVNj9uxKks. More to come..
 

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I was wondering what "removal tool" you were talking about earlier. I usually just use a DeWalt 1/2" electric impact. It'll zip the compensator off without needing to lock anything.

Yes, they are about $200, but they're also incredibly handy for all sorts of things.

...And you could always return it after the job if you wanted to ... Just a thought..
 

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Okay down to rotor. Made my own tool to lock sprockets so I could remove front nut by cutting 8 incheck piece of 3/4" electrical conduit and hammered ends oval so both ends could slip over tooths on both chain rings at each end, thus jamming sprocket from moving. Took a hell of a lot of force to remove front nut.. like breaker bar and 4 foot extension of steel pipe! Threads were normal, left loose. And socket size 1.5". On the back clutch assembly the inner nut (you have to take off stuff to get to it, see vid below) takes a 1 and 3/8" socket and is reverse (right loose). I strapped down brake to rear tire to keep from moving and came off a lot easier than front. Anyway this series of video a big help https://youtu.be/GTVNj9uxKks. More to come..

First of all, thanks for documenting this!

2nd, that pic where you are pointing at the tool had me real confused on what body part what being displayed. I zoomed in and cracked up!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Stoic Joker.. not sure which removal tool you were referring too. The on in the last post was the conduit pipe to lock the sprockets. The earlier post mentions a rotor puller which is recommended bUT costs $125 to buy. I'm just about to make one tonight. I'm thinking you were talking about untightening those big nuts. And zyes, your way sounds good too. (Im always down for another tool)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Rotor off and found my problem. (I need 4 pics to tell this part so I'll break up in two posts). First insteam of $125-150 HD tool to pull rotor I bought steering wheel puller from Performance Tool that did job for $18 bucks and no modifications. I put duct tape over engine sprocket shafts to prevent damage to threads. THEN when I disconnected socket housing that connects stator to regulator.. OIL CAME DRIPPING OUT in copus amounts. Blew my mind. How?? Well when I finally got stator off I could see the housing around the electrical wires, inside primary chain case were FRIED letting oil wick it's way out of the case, down the electrical lines and filling the socket housing with oil (not to mention what bad thing's occur from exposed wiring inside the chain case. (See pic in next post showing cracked wire cover).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
This old girl has the sport of a WWII bomber though.. Two hard rides this sumber to San Francisco and to Sturgis. Both about 1,500 miles each round trip. Never a problem until I pulled into home and then each time bike wont start immediately after.. Anyway here is the fried wires pic.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Okay new stator in, rotor in, regulator in and all wired up. Just need to adjust clutch in the morning, replace chain case cover, refill oil and fire it up. FYI the Cycle Electric upgrade was very easy to install. The electrical cords much less complicated then original. No midway connecting points. Wires run from stator -to regulator - to battery. The only tricky part is reseting the new rotor. For some reason it does not have threaded holes like the HD rotor just holes in the same locations. With the steering wheel puller you can still get some grip through the holes because the screws go in at a slight angle and create some resistence. This allowed me to guide the rotor onto the spine and semi-ease it into place. (Those magnets are damn strong and it would be way dangerous to just push it on without some counter resistence. Mainly because the crash and boom impact likely would be off center and may damage the magnets or stator.) Once I eased it to the teeth of the spindle, Issac Newton'''s gravity took over in a big way and while i had a hold of it, it was struck a little sideways at the front of the shaft. (It's a very tight fit for the rotor into the housing.) Anyway a couple jiggles and it centerd and basically semi-slammed the remaining inch home. I originally thought feeding the electric stator lines through the casing hole was going to be a pain in the ass. It wasn't bad at all. I used some pliers wedged agains the kick stand top assembly to grab and force through. (See pic below). Doesn't take mucharge force. LASTLY there are things like torque settings on bolts, etc that I did not cover. If you do this project buy the service Manuel for your bike! That and Youtube will walk you through it. AND make sure you are not too alcohol impaired to not read the distinction between "foot pounds" and "inch pounds" when tightening things with your torc wrench (I almost succumbed to stupidity but caught at last moment).... PS I will post a conclusion tomorrow if it's all working as it should.
 

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