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Hey y'all, I found some not so friendly train tracks today and now my front rim is bent on my '18 Road Glide. I was thinking about doing the Yaffe 20" fat tire kit but I was wondering if some one had a different idea/opinion about it. The stock wheel no longer holds air and I need to do something relatively quick. I have read quite a bit about the fat tire conversion and haven't found many or any negatives. I like the look (especially with air ride...)


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look at Native Baggers, they pretty much created the look and have bolt on kits as well as full conversions.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I looked at native but I believe they only offer the 18" kit and I think I prefer the larger 20" wheel.


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I didn't plan on running it through insurance. I figured it was an opportunity to go a different direction.

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Which direction are you leaning? Your OP seemed to lean towards moving to a fat tire kit, however after several replies about replacing, you seem to be leaning that direction.

Are you looking for feedback on replacing the existing front rim with something similar or do you want feedback on a fat tire kit?
 

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Man, if I ever come across enough spare change, I'm going the fat tire route as well. They look fantastic on our bikes and I hear tell that it completely changes (for the better) the ride characteristics.

As with everything, the budget is the booger.
 

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If there was a fat tire kit out there that had a rim that was the same design as our Talon wheels- I'd sell the house to pay for it...... I'm just so attached to our stock rims, I can't imagine ever wanting to change them.

Yaffe Kits are nice:
Paul Yaffe's Bagger Nation - SRT | Steam Roller Touring

Native Bagger makes a fine kit as well:

https://www.nativecustombaggers.com/index.php/native-180-or-200mm-front-tire-kit-for-baggers.html

And NB uses Performance Machine wheels as well, so there's another plug for NB:

https://www.nativecustombaggers.com/index.php/wheels-tires/pitbull-fat-front-wheels-tires/pm-platinum-cut-paramount-18x5-5-front-wheel.html
 

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If there was a fat tire kit out there that had a rim that was the same design as our Talon wheels- I'd sell the house to pay for it...... I'm just so attached to our stock rims, I can't imagine ever wanting to change them.



Yaffe Kits are nice:

Paul Yaffe's Bagger Nation - SRT | Steam Roller Touring



Native Bagger makes a fine kit as well:



https://www.nativecustombaggers.com/index.php/native-180-or-200mm-front-tire-kit-for-baggers.html



And NB uses Performance Machine wheels as well, so there's another plug for NB:



https://www.nativecustombaggers.com/index.php/wheels-tires/pitbull-fat-front-wheels-tires/pm-platinum-cut-paramount-18x5-5-front-wheel.html


There is one. Native can get it for you. My local dealership has done two 2018s with that same wheel.


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OP, On the 20-21” fat tire kits you have to change your trees to run. The 18” kits do not, just swap legs, cans and fender and you’re set.


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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for the replies! Although it might be against most logical thinking... I beat the rim back in shape with a rubber mallet and so far its holding air. I've put almost 2000 miles on it with no wobbles or shakes. I'm going to keep it this way until winter rolls in and then it's going under the knife for a fat tire. I haven't decided who's kit yet but I've found a ton of different information and ways I can go. Best of all my wife approves.

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Thanks for the replies! Although it might be against most logical thinking... I beat the rim back in shape with a rubber mallet and so far its holding air. I've put almost 2000 miles on it with no wobbles or shakes. I'm going to keep it this way until winter rolls in and then it's going under the knife for a fat tire. I haven't decided who's kit yet but I've found a ton of different information and ways I can go. Best of all my wife approves.

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Done it myself with a deadblow....on a car though. But I’m sure it will be fine. Is that stock wheel a 19? What would you want for it when you upgrade? Feel free to PM me a price if you’re interested.
 

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I'm not a metallurgist holding a degree in that discipline, but I did spend 16 years in the automotive industry working for a Tier 1 supplier of aluminum wheels to all of the major OEMs. My time was spent in the engineering, reliability testing and quality fields which gives me a little bit of experience dealing with bent and damaged aluminum wheels. All aluminum wheels are made with a combination of aluminum and modifying alloys that produce the ideal combination of load bearing characteristics, hardness, tensile strength and elongation properties when properly heat treated. The tensile strength and elongation are the two that present the most critical issues when dealing with a deformed, damaged or bent aluminum wheel.

I say all that to emphasize that once the original cast and machined form of a piece of heat treated aluminum is deformed, damaged or bent, simply bending that deformity "back into shape" will likely create an area in the aluminum piece that isn't as strong as it was before the damage. Sometimes this isn't an issue if the bent area is out around the clip on flange (as shown in the OPs picture), and on a car riding on 4 wheels I wouldn't be as critical as a bike riding on two. The other danger when reforming heat treated aluminum is the danger of creating micro-stress fractures that can quickly propagate without warning. In many cases these micro-stress fractures aren't even visible to the naked eye or even x-ray analysis. The only way to detect them is through the use of fluorescent dye penetrant inspection and that is useless on an aluminum wheel that has a coating on top (because the stress-fractures are located in the substrate).

It's your ride and your hide, so you can do as you wish. But knowing the things I know I'd never personally take that risk.
 
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