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Spring is here. The sun is slowly warming the earth and the snow is melting fast. It’s time to get your ride out of storage, tuned up and on the road, and grab some refresher lessons. Great riders never stop learning. But maybe you don’t have your license yet, and you’re not sure if this is the year you take the plunge. Maybe you’re content to sit on the sidelines and watch your friends head out on their bikes for heaps of adventure and thrill seeking, always putting it off until next season because…what’s the point? You can’t get your license and go on the epic trips with them in one season anyway – or can you?

Maybe this is the year you finally jump in. Because, the truth is, you can learn to ride and join your friends on those epic road trips all in the space of one season. With the proper training, some easy day trips, and maybe even a day or two on the dirt trails, you could even attempt an epic, multi-day road trip – all in the space of one short season.
Read more about the Easy Steps To Becoming A Touring Motorcyclist at Motorcycle.com.
 

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In 1972 my dad and I left Kansas City on a bus to Fort Worth Texas to pick up an old Honda 450 for a friend of his. Why, just to ride it I guess. One of my dad's hair brain ideas. For the sake of time, dad and I rode that thing all the way back to Kansas, two up. We had to stop every 50 miles so we could rest our butts. The sting was unbearable. Touring motorcyclist? It doesn't take much to tour and the steps to take are as simple as throwing your leg over your bike and putting your knees in the breeze. C-ya!
 

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I would think that the first step would be to get a touring motorcycle instead of those crotch rockets that were pictured in the article. JMO
 

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I would think that the first step would be to get a touring motorcycle instead of those crotch rockets that were pictured in the article. JMO
I know it's an old thread, but I can't resist...I had a 1993 CBR1000F sport bike in Pensacola Florida. I bought a tank bag and set of soft luggage. I threw my tent and sleeping bag on back and headed up to Georgia to ride Deals Gap. I also, later in the year, left Florida for Kansas. I enjoyed it a lot.

I don't think a touring bike is necessarily a must. For some, a "Touring Bike" may be to expensive and for others it's just not what they want. Heck I'd like to get a BMW 1200GS Adventure and take all the trails and gravel roads across the U.S. and just ride for a few weeks or months.
 

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I don't think a touring bike is necessarily a must. For some, a "Touring Bike" may be to expensive and for others it's just not what they want. Heck I'd like to get a BMW 1200GS Adventure and take all the trails and gravel roads across the U.S. and just ride for a few weeks or months.
even a modern day sportster has got to be more comfortable than what some 'old timers' used to ride cross country.

you ride what you got, and you somehow make it work. may not be the best tool for the job, but why buy a $25,000 hammer if you're only gonna use it once a year?
 

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My first touring experiences were on a CBR954 with a tank bag and soft luggage. Worked well. I like the comfort of the Glide much more though.
 
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Easy steps to becoming a touring motorcyclist.

1. Get a bike.
2. Get gear appropriate for the ride.
3. Get something to hold your belongings.
4. Tell the boss your outta here.
5. Ride, see, experience.
 

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....... why buy a $25,000 hammer if you're only gonna use it once a year?

....... give ya something to :smile: about as you walk thru the garage to yer work vehicle every morning
 

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I've toured a lot of this country on a lot of different bikes. Sometimes you just have to get creative. :wink:

1980 CX500 Custom. (picture is not of my old bike, but set up similarly to what I had) I paid $800 for it.
I would just strap it down to the Seat/sissy bar and away I would go.




1978 CX500 Lots of customization to make this bike my first bagger. I paid $1000 for it.



1978 GS750 Again, a lot of customization. I paid $1100 for it.



2005 VN2000 More of a Road King style, but it worked. Took over payments from a buddy. I added the Harley Hard Bags. Cost me about $9000



2012 Road Glide Ultra. It took 30 years, but I finally got the right bike.

 
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Ok - gotta jump in here. My first cross country ride (does that make me a touring motorcyclist?) was the summer of '77' while waiting to leave for basic training. Left South Bend In, to Kansas City, to the Grand Canyon to Yellowstone and even accidentally rolled into Sturgis Bike rally before getting back home. Oh, and I did it on a 1976 Yamaha RD 400 (2 cylinder 2 stroke) LOL - no one said I couldn't do it so since I didn't know better I did it anyways.
 

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In the late 70s into the 80s I toured on a Yamaha 850 special. It was a triple. Tour all over the country on it, camped and had a hell of a time. Then it was a Fatboy, rode the shit out of that thing. Now on my second Roadglide, didn't know how bad I was really roughing it. LOL
 

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Been all over north to south from the Appalachian to the east coast don't think is a formula or a template for touring. Every trip is a different experience for me the less the better. Although a touring bike will be very comfortable will enjoy any two wheel it's about the feeling, memories and experience of been on the road for days last a life time.
Don't over plan or stress between the day destination relax and enjoy the every day journey learn to adjust to weather conditions and what ever come your way don't let obstacles ruin your trip:
1) Prepare your ride for the days you will be away.
2) Have sufficient founds to cover for hotels, camp ground or bike repairs
3) With today technology smart phones make it easy to anticipate and regroup from weather conditions and route changes.
4) keep it simple don't over pack after can't bring everything along the way.
5) free your mind from everything enjoy the open road and the wind on your face.
6) when things go wrong remember is about the experience and the journey relax and enjoy the moment
 
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