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How to save money when extending your brake lines. If you buy the traditional replacement parts to extend your lines it will run a Ben Franklin+. This is normally three brake lines, a threaded junction block and fittings. After looking at the stock setup on my 08 RG, I thought I could cut out two of the brake lines and threaded junction block being replaced.

The first step was to buy a double flairing tool. These can be had for around $20. You will also need a 3/16 brake line fitting. Cut off the upper brake line from the junction block just behind the hose crimp. You need the line to be as long as possible for the flair tool to have enough to work with after the fitting is put on. Debur the inside of the brake line, and bevel the outside of the line where is has been cut. Follow the directions to flare the line as included with the flairing tool. I had to straighten the line just a bit so the fitting would slide down further on the line to allow enough room for the flairing tool to work. After I flaired the line I pressure tested it and checked for leaks. Now all I have to do is measure the one line from the junction block to the master cylinder and order a hose. Aftermarket distributors like J&P Cycles can sell you an individual line and banjo fitting to connect to your master cylinder for around $50.


 

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How to save money when extending your brake lines. If you buy the traditional replacement parts to extend your lines it will run a Ben Franklin+. This is normally three brake lines, a threaded junction block and fittings. After looking at the stock setup on my 08 RG, I thought I could cut out two of the brake lines and threaded junction block being replaced.

The first step was to buy a double flairing tool. These can be had for around $20. You will also need a 3/16 brake line fitting. Cut off the upper brake line from the junction block just behind the hose crimp. You need the line to be as long as possible for the flair tool to have enough to work with after the fitting is put on. Debur the inside of the brake line, and bevel the outside of the line where is has been cut. Follow the directions to flare the line as included with the flairing tool. I had to straighten the line just a bit so the fitting would slide down further on the line to allow enough room for the flairing tool to work. After I flaired the line I pressure tested it and checked for leaks. Now all I have to do is measure the one line from the junction block to the master cylinder and order a hose. Aftermarket distributors like J&P Cycles can sell you an individual line and banjo fitting to connect to your master cylinder for around $50.


old post but got a old bike, just the info i was looking for, thank you Sincecrazy!
 
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