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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK guys... I've searched high and low and had yet to find a decent description of where/how to place a jack under my RGS safely. Now remember I come from a sports/sport-touring bike background and still have the specialized jack stands for those bikes. My thoughts are after spending a bit of time studying the rear part of the frame is to do the following with a floor jack. Take a 2x4 and place it on the jack pad and position it under the cross member frame tubes. Eventually I will get a proper motorcycle jack that works with Harleys, but I really want to get the Ohlins on ASAP.
 

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If you really need to do it that way which I personally wouldn't recommend then make sure you put the front wheel in a wheel dock of some kind to keep the bike stable. You don't need to raise it too high if you're just changing shocks. Just enough to raise or lower the bike the line up the bolt holes on the swing arm. In fact you wont even have to raise the rear wheel off the ground. As far as placement of the jack for your particular equipment I'd suggest keeping it further back on the frame just before the frame bends upwards. All you're doing it keeping the bike from dropping down when you unbolt the shocks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Kewl... I park it on a Condor Pit-stop anyway so the front wheel is secured. Placing the 2x4 across the rear frame tubes was what I meant to type. There is a cross-member there and don't want to bend that. So that's where the 2x4 comes into play.
I'm open to any suggestions that would work better with the tools (jacks) I have on-hand. Even the Harley Service Manual is vague so there was no help there.
 

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Use the condor for the front and jack up the frame as far back as possible without having it slip. Like I said the rear tire does not have to come off the ground. You're just lifting enough to keep the bike from slamming onto the rear tire without shocks on. Line up the bolt holes by jacking or lowering the bike slightly
 

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Use the condor for the front and jack up the frame as far back as possible without having it slip. Like I said the rear tire does not have to come off the ground. You're just lifting enough to keep the bike from slamming onto the rear tire without shocks on. Line up the bolt holes by jacking or lowering the bike slightly
That's how I did mine. It's pretty easy to do. The hardest part (for me) was removing the bushings from my original shocks before inserting them into the new ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's how I did mine. It's pretty easy to do. The hardest part (for me) was removing the bushings from my original shocks before inserting them into the new ones.
Thanks... That's good to hear. And I've had my share of fun removing bushing from shock without destroying them!

There's a lot to be said about "Google that", JP cycle has a good tube on it. Keep her plum and get her done
I did... And none of the JP videos I saw showed where they put the jack. In most it looked like it was somewhere forward of where I was thinking. I'd rather be chastised than bend or punch a hole in something.
 

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I use a scissor jack for doing rear shocks. More precise when you have to raise/lower the bike to line up the bolts.




 
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