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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, so baby needs a new pair of shoes, and I'm on a budget ... Yeah yeah bad - I know - but work with me here..


I'm looking at a set of Kenda K6702 Cataclysm tires and am wondering if anyone has tried a set? They are supposed to be a dual compound tire like the Dunlap AE, for about half the price.



My riding style varies from daily commuting, to two up long rides, to the occasional extremely aggressive shenanigans ... So all weather grip - and progressive/predictable breakaway - is extremely critical for me.



Thoughts?
 

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Their technology center is 300 yards from the garage I work out of. I wasn't aware they made bike tires. I've thought of stopping in the to inquire more than once.

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Okay, so baby needs a new pair of shoes, and I'm on a budget ... Yeah yeah bad - I know - but work with me here..


I'm looking at a set of Kenda K6702 Cataclysm tires and am wondering if anyone has tried a set? They are supposed to be a dual compound tire like the Dunlap AE, for about half the price.



My riding style varies from daily commuting, to two up long rides, to the occasional extremely aggressive shenanigans ... So all weather grip - and progressive/predictable breakaway - is extremely critical for me.



Thoughts?
The OEM tires might be cheaper than you think. I recently bought new Dunlop OEMs for my RG. i checked the price online and also the cost of mounting and balancing at non-Harley dealers first. Our local dealer was having a sale. The tires were the same price or a little lower, and mounting and balance was $95 for both tires. A number of dealers are not doing well financially, and are doing things unheard of at HD such as sales of products and services.
 

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you sure they fit? i know they don't make them in the cvo sizes, 19 front, 18 rear. but it shows that they make an 18 front, 16 rear. the prices on them are not that much less than the avon cobras, or the american elites. both of which are highly rated tires.

also, double check the load ratings. the rear seems right, but the front seems a little low, though i'm not sure off the top of my head what the stock load rating is.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
you sure they fit? i know they don't make them in the cvo sizes, 19 front, 18 rear. but it shows that they make an 18 front, 16 rear. the prices on them are not that much less than the avon cobras, or the american elites. both of which are highly rated tires.

also, double check the load ratings. the rear seems right, but the front seems a little low, though i'm not sure off the top of my head what the stock load rating is.
I don't have a CVO, I've got a 10 FLTRX so 16/18 is fine, and the load ratings are within range. JP Cycles has the Kenda set on sale now for $220.98 or $198.88 with the 10% Veterans day discount. So the Kenda set is cheaper than just the rear from most brands ... And I can't seem to find a bad review on them.


Kenda Tires K6702 Cataclysm 180/65B16 Rear Tire $124.99
Kenda Tires K6702 Cataclysm 130/70B18 Front Tire $95.99


It's damn tempting to give them a shot.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The OEM tires might be cheaper than you think. I recently bought new Dunlop OEMs for my RG..
Fair point, buy my local dealer isn't a huge fan of discounts (deep or otherwise), and the service department is too high-horse uppity for my liking.


Historically I've always changed my own tires, but I can't use spoons on the chrome Reaper rims, so I'm toying with trying the ziptie method.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Finally got the Kenda Cataclysms mounted yesterday, and only have maybe 20 miles on them. But - first impressions - the ride is much smoother than the Dunlop AEs ... I don't know that I would it call it dramatically smoother, but it is definitely (cloud like) noticeable. And the profile makes for an extremely aggressive (as in pleasantly effortless) drop into corners.


It will take a while to get used to them before I start playing with how predictable/forgiving the edge of traction is, but the my initial impression so far is I'm happy with them.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Okay curious puck that I am I couldn't resist at least poking at where the edge might be, and traction wise, these things are stickier that trying to pry a squid off a window. Even when getting - edge of foolishly - heavy handed with the brakes Trixie stopped before I could get the ABS to kick in. And when launching hard (1,1000rpms to 2/3rds throttle) across a 3" wide solid painted line there wasn't even a hint of slippage ... The AEs would have let go before I even hit the line pulling that shit.


Now time will tell what kind of mileage I get out these tires, but traction wise the Kenda Cataclysms are a definite - She said flog me harder daddy I wand more level - win!
 

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Might be right up my alley. I am always looking for tires with the most grab, especially in the wet. My stock 15 RGS tires are ok. But I've had better. I don't care if they only last a season (my short season that is). I might get through the summer on my current ones but I'll have these on my list next. Thank you.

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Discussion Starter #10
All is not well in testing land:
While the wet weather grip is excellent, I did finally get a chance to get Trixie enough room to open her up...and she now has a bit of a wiggling problem. It's a soft head shake at around 90 that is just pronounced enough to make one not want to push farther. in a corner at 95 she's fine (which was interesting..), but straight line she wants to wiggle.


Tire pressure was set at the shop to 36psi rear, and 34.5 front. So I raised it to 42psi rear (sidewall max), and 38 front. I'll find out later in the week if that helped or hurt the situation ... But a speed wobble is a definite deal breaker for the Kenda tire test.


On a side note: The Dunlop AE's also wobbled a bit when the pressure got low, so I'm hoping that'll be the fix ... But I won't know for sure until later in the week when I get her out on the highway again.


Shit.
 

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Finally got the Kenda Cataclysms mounted yesterday, and only have maybe 20 miles on them. But - first impressions - the ride is much smoother than the Dunlop AEs ... I don't know that I would it call it dramatically smoother, but it is definitely (cloud like) noticeable. And the profile makes for an extremely aggressive (as in pleasantly effortless) drop into corners.


It will take a while to get used to them before I start playing with how predictable/forgiving the edge of traction is, but the my initial impression so far is I'm happy with them.


Did you end up using the zip tie methods to mount them? I've done it that way several times now and have gotten pretty good at it. Just wondering how it went and what your thoughts are on it?


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Discussion Starter #12
Did you end up using the zip tie methods to mount them? I've done it that way several times now and have gotten pretty good at it. Just wondering how it went and what your thoughts are on it?


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I was really tempted to give it a shot, but two things stopped me:
1. If anything went wrong it would have left me trying to hand lever tires on/off of the Chrome HD Reaper rims ... And those AE sidewalls are stiff as hell.
2. I really wanted them balanced to make it a fair comparison to the AE's


I should probably also mention that the bike is my primary transportation, so gambling was not an acceptable risk.
 

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I was really tempted to give it a shot, but two things stopped me:
1. If anything went wrong it would have left me trying to hand lever tires on/off of the Chrome HD Reaper rims ... And those AE sidewalls are stiff as hell.
2. I really wanted them balanced to make it a fair comparison to the AE's


I should probably also mention that the bike is my primary transportation, so gambling was not an acceptable risk.

I get that. If you ever do decide to try it in the future here are some things I have learned.


Put the tires out in the sun for a while to warm them up. A few burnouts in the culdesac usually helps speed this process up on the rear tire.
I'm kidding! Maybe... >:)

Use at least 6-8 big zip ties. Once you get them all on go around again and snug them up as tight as possible by putting your knee on the tires pushing it together as you tighten the zip tie. The tighter you can get the zip ties the easier it will make getting the tires off/on.

***Breaking the bead and getting the first zip tie in is the hardest part. I have a HF bead breaker but I know people have made their own. I also use my tire irons that I have wrapped in tape just to create a space to slide the 1st zip tie through. Once you get 1 on and tightened some you are home free. You will no longer need to make a space.

Use plenty of lube on the tire bead and the rim. I went by a local tire shop and they gave me a big glob in a zip lock bag for free. It work better than anything else I've tried.

Get a few sections of 4x4's and an old carpet or towel to put the rim on so that you are not putting any pressure on the rotors.

Taking tire off- I usually put my foot on the rim where I am going to start pulling the tire off. Once you get it to a certain point the whole tire comes right off at once. Tires with tall sidewalls will almost fall off because you can make the inside circle bigger.

Putting tire on- Start one side of the tire onto the rim making sure it goes up into the drop zone of the center of the wheel and then start walking the rest of the tire onto the rim with you hands and knees if necessary.

Once you get the new tire on just take the zip ties off and bounce the tire and wheel a bit as your rotating it to get the bead to start touching the rim. Then I start filling with air to set the bead (2 pops) before I put the valve stem in. Once both sides are seated I then put in my Ride-On tire balancer. Then put in the valve stem, proper amount of air, and install the cap.

19" fronts are the hardest to do due to the short side wall but the are doable. 17", 18" fronts are no problem. 16", 18" rears are not bad either. The extra work you do in the beginning getting the zip ties as tight as they can be pays off when you get to putting the tire on the wheel.

If it is difficult to get the tire off I have used my tire irons that I wrapped and the plastic rim protectors to help things along. It does not take as much pressure though as it would without the zip ties.

This sounds like a lot and I guess it can be but if you are one that likes to do things yourself to save you money this is not a bad option. Like I said before, breaking the bead and getting the zip ties tight enough is the bulk of the work.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Holy shit man, that write-up is better than the videos I watched!


But I gotta toss in a bit of background. Back in the early 80's - when I was 16 - I worked at a motorcycle junkyard, and as would be expected...I got stuck with most of the tire changes. Remember rim locks? Ah! good times (Not..). I got quite good at it back then and had always prided myself on doing my own going forward for the next almost 4 decades. I levered the Michelins on Alice without a problem. And then I got a set of Dunlop AEs for my brother's 85...


They kicked my ass.


After 2 hours of fighting with the damn things, I finally had to admit that (50+) granddad had gotten beat ... And phoned a friend for backup. It took both of us another hour of sun baking the tire into submission before it finally went on. And then we had to lube the thing up like a virgin to get the bead to seat at somewhere around 150psi.




"It's good for a man to know his limitations..." - Dirty Harry.

:grin:



I will someday try the ziptie method - it's just too intriguing not to - however... I just didn't have the time (or stones...) to experiment with it on a $2,000 set of rims.
 

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I have had the Cataclysm tires on my '10 FLTRX for the past 4000 miles and I like them a lot. I mounted them at home with the HF tire changer and mojolever. I put ride-on sealant in my tires and they have been smooth as silk the whole time.
 

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I just, today. Received a set for my 03 serk. Probably be a while before i get them installed. But I will post results.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
More air pressure fixed the wobbling issue.


42 psi rear
38psi front


up to, at, and past 90mph.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I have had the Cataclysm tires on my '10 FLTRX for the past 4000 miles and I like them a lot. I mounted them at home with the HF tire changer and mojolever. I put ride-on sealant in my tires and they have been smooth as silk the whole time.

Outstanding, sorry I didn't see this earlier. Can I ask what tire pressure you're running?


I'm currently at 1,000 miles on my set and showing no appreciable wear. The tits are still on the side of the tread where I usually slid around corners with the AE's ...(and it ain't for lack of trying)... So I am quite impressed with these.


However my brother hates them, as he had no luck keeping up with me during the Bike Week hijinks - he spun - I went zoom. :grin:
 

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I started out running the H-D recommended 36 front 40 rear but the bike felt really weird, like it didn't want to turn at all. It was fighting me the whole time. I eventually settled on 42/42 and it works great for me.

I've got a little over 6500mi on them now. The front shows zero wear, the rear is starting to flatten out on the center. I'll definitely buy these tires again if they keep performing like they have so far.
 
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