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Just checked it out on HD's site. Thinking .. .. this looks like pure fun. Then thinking . . ... you're 66 DA. You shouldn't be doing any of the stuff these are built for! Still, looks like fun to me . . . . .
 

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Just checked it out on HD's site. Thinking .. .. this looks like pure fun. Then thinking . . ... you're 66 DA. You shouldn't be doing any of the stuff these are built for! Still, looks like fun to me . . . . .
Here's the reality. I had back surgery 2 years ago, and the same disc has herniated again. Riding my Night Train is agony, and the Roadie wasn't much better. If I buy one of these, it'll primarily be a touring bike that sees some gravel roads. I'll never be able to ride Moab again.

All that suspension travel means that your back doesn't get punished on bad roads.

And then there's that sick power-to-weight ratio.....







The obvious question is this.....The fairing, such as it is, is fixed. Is it still a Shark?
 

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All that suspension travel means that your back doesn't get punished on bad roads.
It looks like the special version has a more electronically adjustable suspension. Might be a real positive for the back sure enough.
 
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It looks like the special version has a more electronically adjustable suspension. Might be a real positive for the back sure enough.
Back in 2012 we did a group ride through central Pennsyltucky. I was on my GS/A with my wife, everyone else was on varying flavors of Harley. PA roads are a borderline hate crime, and the ones we were on were especially egregious. At one stop, every passenger and most riders were bitching about how bad the roads were. My wife said, "I didn't notice, I was asleep".

ADV bikes are the shiznit on bad roads.
 

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Out here in AZ we have a limited supply of paved roads, but an unlimited supply of unpaved roads. The PA could open a whole new world to my riding adventures. They show guys ripping it up on gnarly trails but I want it for the endless backroads we have. And how cool would it be to do it on a Harley? Way cool.
 

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Can someone explain why spoked wheels are better than cast for off-road? Weight? Durability? I see this debate with Jeeps, steel vs aluminum.
Edit: I’m reading about it and I guess the spokes allow a certain amount of flex, but if the rim is still aluminum (which the description says it is) it could still crack like a mag wheel.
 

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Can someone explain why spoked wheels are better than cast for off-road? Weight? Durability? I see this debate with Jeeps, steel vs aluminum.
Edit: I’m reading about it and I guess the spokes allow a certain amount of flex, but if the rim is still aluminum (which the description says it is) it could still crack like a mag wheel.
From




Kenny Buchanan, of Buchanan’s Spoke and Rim, took us to school. Most off-road wheels use 36 or 40 spokes, and each spoke can have up to 1.500 pounds (!) of tension. These pull equally on the entire rim’s circumference. Introduce a sharp load in one spot (our nemesis the rock) and the wheel tries to take an oval form. But because the entire rim is in tension, this deflection transfers the load maybe 270 degrees around the balance of the wheel—and that means 27 spokes at 1,500 pounds each are all trying to pull the wheel round again. Now hit that same rock with the same bike at the same speed, but rolling on a cast wheel, and directly over one of the large cast spokes. The force is localized over a small area. There’s no give. Plus, the alloy used for your cast wheel is less malleable to begin with. The wider the rim (big adventure bikes), the more exacerbated the problem.
 

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Can someone explain why spoked wheels are better than cast for off-road? Weight? Durability? I see this debate with Jeeps, steel vs aluminum.
Edit: I’m reading about it and I guess the spokes allow a certain amount of flex, but if the rim is still aluminum (which the description says it is) it could still crack like a mag wheel.
Yeah, it's about the flex. And if you do really bone something up, you can replace a spoke without losing air pressure.
 

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Iam certainly NOT in the market for an off road bike. Between my back, chest and ribs, there is no way I could take a tumble, but off road bikes have always peaked my interest with the long travel suspension.
A friend let me climb on his African Twin, and there was no way I could put 2 tip toes down, much less two feet down, so I never gave an Adventure bike a second look.
A suspension that automatically lowers itself when coming to a stop and then raises as you start back up would be a game changer for me......but I just bought my last bike:unsure:
 

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Iam certainly NOT in the market for an off road bike. Between my back, chest and ribs, there is no way I could take a tumble, but off road bikes have always peaked my interest with the long travel suspension.
A friend let me climb on his African Twin, and there was no way I could put 2 tip toes down, much less two feet down, so I never gave an Adventure bike a second look.
A suspension that automatically lowers itself when coming to a stop and then raises as you start back up would be a game changer for me......but I just bought my last bike:unsure:
Just read its less than an inch of drop, just saved myself 20K:LOL:
 

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I have the first special that comes into McDermounts H-D in upstate NY... Really hoping it’s the all black one so I can also match it with the hard H-D bags in black..I’m really looking forward to this type riding, we have 100’- 1000-‘S of off-road riding, fire trails... And several more that are being and have been built... I will give my 100% Honest reviews.. I have owned a few KTM and a few Suzuki VStroms... Both great bikes, The Suzuki’s were just bulletproof that just got the job done... Hard to hate and Hard to love... I will keep everyone updated... I was told delivery in may sometime..
 

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You know it just dawned on me. I could never risk trying to get my RGU to our cabin with a mile of steep gravel road and one stream crossing. This thing here would be the ticket.
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I have no idea how you define technical trails, but 99.9% of these bikes won't get ridden on anything more difficult than a gravel road, fire road, or wilderness access road. I don't know of any experienced rider who would take a 600 pound bike on anything I'd call a technical trail. Technical trails are for enduro or trials bike riders in my mind.
I would say that only the "Experienced" rider would be the ones that would try difficult trails. Valid point on the smaller bikes though and I agree that they are better for certain types of terrain. Doesn't mean that a skilled experienced rider won't end up on some difficult stretches from time to time while exploring. I wish I lived in an area where I could just go around the corner to hit some offroad trails and then I would be looking at a Suzuki DR450 or something along that line. I don't and I'm not going to have 2 bikes right now so I have to decide what the 1 bike is for me. The larger ADV bikes will allow me to travel long distances and also allow me to explore many types of off road routes. My days of 2 stroke motocross jumping are behind me and if I hit some single track technical trails on a 600lb ADV bike it doesn't mean I have to ride it like I did the 2 stroke. I feel confident in my judgement and ability to know what I can or can't do on a given bike. Doesn't mean I won't drop it from time to time but I'm still able to handle that situation when it happens. When the day comes wher I can no longer handle that I will stop putting myself in those situations and maybe even get a different ride if needed.

BTW... Your percentage is way exagerated. I know quite a few guys that will put their 600lb GS or SA on places some won't go on much smaller bikes. But like many have said they make great touring bikes and their is nothing wrong with someone buying one and putting street tires on it and riding it exclusively on the hard surfaces if that's what they want to do. I frequent BMW K1600, GS, and Ducati Forums. They all say the same shit about HD riders riding to the Starbucks so anyone can find examples of any motorcycle to justify a particular opinion of it. No different than the way pople argue about politics.

EDIT: OBTW... We ALL ride to Starbucks from time to time no matter what brand of bike we ride because there's always that one friend in the group. Any of you guys know David Mitchell AKA @mitchdm and his 2012 CVO Skunk with the S&S 124"? Yeah, he's that one friend... Lol!
 

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Without something to protect that oil cooler on the front of that skid-plate there won't be too many riding off-road aggressively. And I would recommend buying some wrist sweatbands to put on your pee cups (front brake res.), will protect your brake fluid/clutch fluid from breaking down in the sunlight. Just slide sweat band over reservoir and voila you have uv protection.
 
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Without something to protect that oil cooler on the front of that skid-plate there won't be too many riding off-road aggressively. And I would recommend buying some wrist sweatbands to put on your pee cups (front brake res.), will protect your brake fluid/clutch fluid from breaking down in the sunlight. Just slide sweat band over reservoir and voila you have uv protection.
Ahhhhh ..... I've seen bikes with sweat bands or women's hair scrunchies on their reservoirs but never stopped to think about why. Now I know, "The rest of the story."
 

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I would say that only the "Experienced" rider would be the ones that would try difficult trails. Valid point on the smaller bikes though and I agree that they are better for certain types of terrain. Doesn't mean that a skilled experienced rider won't need end up on some difficult stretches from time to time while exploring. I wish I lived in an area where I could just go around the corner to hit some offroad trails ans I would be looking at a Suzuki DR450 or something along that line. I don't and I'm not going to have 2 bikes right now so I have to decide what the 1 bike is for me. The larger ADV bikes will allow me to travel long distances and also allow me to explore many types of off road routes. My days of 2 stroke motocross jumping are behind me and if I hit some single track technical trails on a 600lb ADV bike it doesn't mean I have to ride it like I did the 2 stroke. I feel confident in my judgement and ability to know what I can or can't do on a given bike. Doesn't mean I won't drop it rom time to time but I'm still able to handle that situation when it happens. When the day comes wher I can no longer handle that I will stop putting myself in those situations and maybe even get a different ride if needed.

BTW... Your percentage is way exagerated. I know quite a few guys that will puy their 600lb GS or SA on places some won't go on much smaller bikes. But like mant have said they make great touring bikes and their is nothing wrong with someone buying one and putting street tires on it and riding it exclusively on the hard surfaces if that's what they want to do. I frequent BMW K1600, GS, and Ducati Forums. They all say the same shit about HD riders rider to the Starbucks so anyone can find examples of any motorcycle to justify a particular opinion of it. No different than the way pople argue about politics.
So are there lots of opportunities to ride gravel up in your part of the state? I'd guess that there has to be some in the Ocala National Forest, but beyond that I don't know much about the lay of the land in the northern most portions of the state. Off the top of my head, I don't know of anywhere to ride off road in SW FL. There are some gravel roads in the central part of the state but those are mostly smooth and straight as an arrow, not exactly great adventure riding. Personally, I was thinking of the Pan America in terms of replacing my RG when the 900 b. weight factor becomes a bigger issue with me. Put the cast wheels, plastic hard bags, and road tires on it and 'voila' you have a sport touring machine. Hopefully they have future plans for creating a 'lite' touring bike off this platform as well as the urban muscle bike that they've shown snippets of.

It mostly comes down to how successful they've been with dialing in some really good suspension on the PA. I didn't hear them mention anything about who makes the suspension components. Knowing how important suspension is on this type of bike , I half expected them to reference Fox or Ohlins or some suspension supplier as having worked with them to develop the new suspension parts just to give them some instant street cred. Maybe they did and I just didn't hear it.
 
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I would say that only the "Experienced" rider would be the ones that would try difficult trails. Valid point on the smaller bikes though and I agree that they are better for certain types of terrain. Doesn't mean that a skilled experienced rider won't end up on some difficult stretches from time to time while exploring. I wish I lived in an area where I could just go around the corner to hit some offroad trails and then I would be looking at a Suzuki DR450 or something along that line. I don't and I'm not going to have 2 bikes right now so I have to decide what the 1 bike is for me. The larger ADV bikes will allow me to travel long distances and also allow me to explore many types of off road routes. My days of 2 stroke motocross jumping are behind me and if I hit some single track technical trails on a 600lb ADV bike it doesn't mean I have to ride it like I did the 2 stroke. I feel confident in my judgement and ability to know what I can or can't do on a given bike. Doesn't mean I won't drop it from time to time but I'm still able to handle that situation when it happens. When the day comes wher I can no longer handle that I will stop putting myself in those situations and maybe even get a different ride if needed.

BTW... Your percentage is way exagerated. I know quite a few guys that will put their 600lb GS or SA on places some won't go on much smaller bikes. But like many have said they make great touring bikes and their is nothing wrong with someone buying one and putting street tires on it and riding it exclusively on the hard surfaces if that's what they want to do. I frequent BMW K1600, GS, and Ducati Forums. They all say the same shit about HD riders riding to the Starbucks so anyone can find examples of any motorcycle to justify a particular opinion of it. No different than the way pople argue about politics.

EDIT: OBTW... We ALL ride to Starbucks from time to time no matter what brand of bike we ride because there's always that one friend in the group. Any of you guys know David Mitchell AKA @mitchdm and his 2012 CVO Skunk with the S&S 124"? Yeah, he's that one friend... Lol!
Good post, except you will never see my bikes in front of a Starbucks. I’ve bought black coffee from them in airports, but that is it. I actually do my best to avoid corporate eateries.
 
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