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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a question?

Bridging a 4 channel amplifier will effectively double your amp's output (watts) so that you can drive more power to your speakers or subs. Its pretty easy to to bridge a 4 channel amp if you have a basic knowledge of of car audio wiring and how to connect an amp to your car or bikes audio system. The most common application when bridging a 4 channel amp is to connect a an amp to a pair of 4 ohm subs or speakers. BTW, I have no f'n clue what ohms are and how to read them, or continuity or impedance or use a multimeter, EVEN THOUGH I OWN 2 of them, isn't that awful???


By bridging your amp and front speakers and wires are certain way, will that ultimately effect how Im going to need to wire my rear channel if I ever decide down the road that I want to install a complete front AND REAR system.
In other words, If you can see in the article below and pictures I posted, bridging is done in an unorthodox way by taking a wire and clamping it down on the far right side (or channel 1) to the first set of terminals which are:

{-(#1 channel/L side)+} of the amplifier TO the left side of fairing input 6.5' speaker {L(-/+)R}=Channel #1

TO:

{-(#2 channel/R side)+} of the amplifier TO the right side of fairing input 6.5' speaker {L(-/+R}=Channel #2

Since, you 'bridged the terminal and wires by clamping them done in the opposing terminals to deliver more power for your front channel, if by adding a rear channel, would'nt you have to 'UN-BRIDGE' if you will or just wire them normally or traditionally by putting them the way we were brought up knowing, for example positive amplifier right side input CHANNEL 1 (+) goes into right side of positive speaker input (+) in channel 1 and negative left INPUT of wire to (AMPLIFIER) (CHANNEL 1) goes to negative LEFT SIDE INPUT of speaker (-) and so on, and so forth, etc...???

Can we blow out our speakers or fuses or amps by pushing more power than our system is used to if you leave them bridged and not re-arranging the wires the traditional way?? Will this cause problems in any way possible if we leave it bridged in our original 'FRONT AUDIO SETUP MODE' to our $1100 system that we paid for whether it be to any vital parts that make our system work to its optimal potential?

This is all assuming I'm using ONLY 1 600 watt 4 channel amp to drive all these components to work at its potential. And stop me if Im way off here cause I'm just guessing as I go along. If I was to add a 2nd amplifier Im sure the schematics and wiring would change not to mention adding pieces like a ground block (distribution block, thicker power cables and re-arrange some of the wiring so that to ease up off the power of the 1st amp and that the 2nd amp can step up and handle some of the load??) Just a guess???

Does that make sense?


HERES THE ARTICLE, took it from crutchfield, car audio!
Locate the speaker wire terminals on your amp. There will be four speaker wire terminals, or channels, which consist of both a positive and negative terminal with a screw-down clamping system to hold the speaker wire securely in place.


2
Run speaker wire from the positive terminal of channel one to the positive terminal of the first subwoofer. Use the wire stripper to strip about ½ inch of insulation from both ends of the wire, and clamp the speaker wire down securely in the amp's terminal using the screwdriver.


3
Run speaker wire from the negative terminal of channel two to the negative terminal of the first subwoofer. Again, strip ½ inch of insulation from both ends of the wire, and clamp the speaker wire down securely by tightening the terminals screw-down clamp.


4
Repeat steps 2 and 3 for channels three and four. Again, run speaker wire from the positive terminal of channel 3 to the positive terminal of subwoofer two. Finally, run speaker wire from the negative terminal of channel four to the negative terminal of subwoofer two.

HERES ANOTHER QUESTION:
BRIDGING NOT ONLY APPLIES TO SUBWOOFERS BUT TO FAIRING SPEAKERS AS WELL, correct?
OR should I say any kind of speakers,Thanks guyzzz
John S

Tip
Keep in mind that when bridging an amp, the resistance load (measured in ohms) is effectively cut in half. For example, if you are powering a 4-ohm subwoofer with a bridged amp, the resistance load would drop to 2 ohms. It's important to make sure that you're amp is capable of handling a 2-ohm load. Check your amp's manual for that information.
Warning
Never allow an amp to operate below its minimum resistance level (ohms), because it can damage the amp beyond repair due to overheating. Most amps are capable of running a 2-ohm load, but check your amp's manual to be sure.
 

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That road trip is looking pretty good huh!!!!

Look at the instructions for the amp, it shows you how to wire for 2 speakers bridged and the associated switch positions. The wires in the harness are even labeled with stickers that show left, right, pos, and neg.

That amp is totally fine for 2 speakers bridged but very weak in 4 channel mode. If you want to move to a 4 speaker setup down the road you’ll need a different 4 channel amp or another 4V2.




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Discussion Starter #5
ty
No, I was just asking cause Ill be honest with you I know how to do it
I was just wondering the 'what if', you were to add a rear channel while the front channel has already been wired to bridged, could you in fact run a rear channel with that same amp? or would you best better off, probably running a 2nd amp, I think I got the answer..in short probably just install a 2nd amp!

More power=More Clean Power=More Juice!
Thanks
JS
 

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ty
No, I was just asking cause Ill be honest with you I know how to do it
I was just wondering the 'what if', you were to add a rear channel while the front channel has already been wired to bridged, could you in fact run a rear channel with that same amp? or would you best better off, probably running a 2nd amp, I think I got the answer..in short probably just install a 2nd amp!

More power=More Clean Power=More Juice!
Thanks
JS
When you're in bridged mode there is no more independent rear channel. The front and rear are basically combined into one big channel. Once bridged the only way to add additional speakers is to change to speakers with higher impedance because you still have to end up with a 4 ohm load to avoid letting the magic smoke out. Even if you had the right speaker combination to make the math work you will have cut the power so significantly that it will sound like crap.

Bottom line - don't even try it, not worth the hassle.

Also remember - the second you bought the DSP the game changed. The value and purpose of the DSP is being able to control and setup each speaker or set of speakers exactly to your liking to get the most sound quality possible. To do that you need to have each individual speaker or at least a set of 2 speakers on its own amp channel. Not a big deal at all when you're only talking about 2 front fairing speakers. As you add rear channels and especially if you go with horns like you previously mentioned, it becomes critical. You will need to have enough amps that front speakers, rear speakers, and horns each have their own channel.
 

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Like others stated, basically converting 4 ch amp to 2 effectively doubling the output. To add rear speakers you will need another amp 2 chnl. Just size it for the speakers being used. This amp would then connect to the head unit rear output.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
I got a stupid question!

How do you install a an aftermarket head unit like a KENWOOD OR ALPINE or something, with a 6” inch or 7” inch double din screen from the stock 4.3’ inch stock Harmon Kardon unit?

Can it be done? And if so what kind of Metra aftermarket plastic kit do you need for an 18’ Road Glide?

Just wondering?

Thanks
John S
 

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If I remember correctly the 4.3 is in the same hole as the 6.5, it just has a different faceplate.

The Sony xav 5000 is the most popular replacement. With a well tuned DSP you should be able to get just as good sound out of the stock system as you could an aftermarket radio.

Don’t need the DSP with aftermarket radio. The Sony doesn’t have built in NAV and you lose some functionality on the hand controls compared to the 6.5

Is it getting dark down the rabbit hole yet???


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