Road Glide banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My brother and I are planning to attempt and Iron Butt Saddle Sore (1,000 miles in 24 hours) ride very soon. I was hoping to get advice, tips and suggestions for the ride. Any tips about strategy, gear, and tools would be greatly appreciated! Ride safe!:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,897 Posts
Make sure you have you route a little over the requirement. I used google maps to plan mine but when it came back from iron butt assoc. I was credited for less than my odometer said and also what google maps said. I still met the requirement but their calculation was different than google maps and my odometer. None of the three were the same. As for tools I just have a small kit on my bike along with a tire plug kit. Only you guys know the condition of your bikes and what may go wrong. You can never predict everything. Rain gear and maybe a full face helmet for rain if you wear one. I only took breaks during gas stops and they were short ones. Ate fiber one bars and power bars on the fly with water close by. I did mine 1096 miles in 15 hours 21 minutes from Fredericksburg, VA to Jackson, MS.
Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hadn't thought about the different map programs not having the same mileage! I'm on a 2015 shark and my brother is on an older softail. I have a decent tool kit, but i need a tire patch/fill kit. Did you pack a small compressor for tire reinflation?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,930 Posts
I've done 8 iron butts, one which I turned in to the Association. It was 1138 miles from Colorado Springs, Co. to Chicago, Ill. If you want some pointers, pm me and I'll give you a phone number to talk. It is a tough deal but very enjoyable,.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Pre ride hydration and aspirin. Stay away from fast food.
never have turned one in to IBA but plan to this summer. Done PHX TO STL in 22 hrs. And Phx to Naperville IL in 34 hrs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,860 Posts
Go to the IBA site and read the rules...CAREFULLY!!

http://www.ironbutt.com/ridecerts/

I completed a Saddle Sore 1000 ride yesterday and forgot one important element for the certification...the final gas receipt for my completion time....very stupid mistake on my part. I had refueled earlier for a final time to complete my run of 1037.5 miles in 15 hours, 21 minutes from Charlottesville, VA to Leawood, KS, but neglected to fill up at the completion point to indicate my finish time on the run. I have all of the other receipts and witnesses, start to finish. Generally, I would not care as I have made many long rides in the past, but never certified. This time I wanted a certified run but made that costly error.

As for the ride itself, I went to Charlottesville for the Memorial Day weekend and decided to Iron Butt my way home yesterday. I figured on a 16-17 hour ride so I planned it pretty well as I also took time to take pictures for 10 ABC Touring points, those being six states (VA, WV, OH, KY, IN & IL), three National Forests (George Washington, Daniel Boone & Hoosier), and one National Park, Shenandoah.

In terms of preparation, I go over the bike completely before any long ride checking tires and pressures, lights, fuses, belt, nuts and bolts. I carry basic tools, a mini compressor, tire plugs, oil and a first aid kit with me. I also ride in rain bibs with a waterproof jacket over layers that can be removed. I wear different weight gloves depending on weather, ear plugs and a modular helmet with a sun visor. Chap stick and sunscreen are a must. I have highway pegs and use a T-Bag on the rear seat as a backrest. The T-bag holds repair items for the bike and an extra helmet and jacket. I keep my clothes in the saddlebags (this was a five day trip). The Tour Pak holds other footwear, camera and tripod, extra water and granola/protein bar boxes.

I carry small bottles of water that are easily accessible in the fairing lower glove boxes along with granola and protein bars. I have the magnetic flaps on my glove boxes for easy opening/closing.

My only stops are for gas (and on this run for ABC touring points). At the refueling stops, I use the restroom, stretch a little and hydrate up and may have a snack. Once the tank is filled and I have taken a drink/snack/restroom break, I am off again.

I have no trouble riding for great distances and enjoy doing so often. Paying attention to other drivers is very important, especially on a long ride when you begin to feel tired, and you will eventually. Utilize the fuel stops to loosen up and relax your muscles, they work hard on a long ride...and stay hydrated...very important!

Good luck and enjoy your ride!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the great information everyone! Please keep the suggestions coming, it is most helpful! I have done several long distance trips in the past but never as intense and regulated as this. I need to really make sure I have all documentation together so I can get the ride certified.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Going to try to avoid caffeine and high sugar content drinks as long as possible, but I am planing to pack a 5 hour just in case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I double checked the route yesterday and Google maps has it at 558 miles one way. I hope that is enough of a cushion.

Make sure you have you route a little over the requirement. I used google maps to plan mine but when it came back from iron butt assoc. I was credited for less than my odometer said and also what google maps said. I still met the requirement but their calculation was different than google maps and my odometer. None of the three were the same. As for tools I just have a small kit on my bike along with a tire plug kit. Only you guys know the condition of your bikes and what may go wrong. You can never predict everything. Rain gear and maybe a full face helmet for rain if you wear one. I only took breaks during gas stops and they were short ones. Ate fiber one bars and power bars on the fly with water close by. I did mine 1096 miles in 15 hours 21 minutes from Fredericksburg, VA to Jackson, MS.
Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
That should be plenty of cushion. You should have no problems on your Road Glide. Depending on how your brother's Softail is setup, he may struggle. This will make me sound old (F##k it, I am old), but a windshield is your friend for rides like this.

The 5-hour drink has no caffeine, and can really help towards the end. The first 700 miles are EASY. Watch each other and be extra cautious the last few hundred miles. That is really when the fatigue sets in.

I made the mistake of doing this with 6 bikes rather than 1 or 2. Big mistake. We all finished, but what a hassle. Be clear with each other on mileage between fuel stops, use good hand signals, and don't spend much time dicking around when you stop.

Unexpected stuff happens. During our ride I64 near Lexington KY was totally shut down for a traffic fatality accident. We took that opportunity to ride the shoulder to an exit and grab dinner.

Get plenty of rest the night before and just enjoy the ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
852 Posts
Same as those mentioned above. Really study the rules and make sure you have a system for keeping everything organized and dry. If you can, pick a route that will allow for higher speeds. I carry a decent set of tools. I use ride on and carry mushroom plugs and a mini compressor. Backrest is a must. Lots of water and snacks. I like nuts and bananas. My back is not what it once was so I keep advil or other headache medicine handy. I will usually pop a couple of aleve prior to heading out and it keeps me from getting stiff. I probably stop more frequently than most but my bladder can only handle about 100 miles.

Oh, one more thing. If you don't normally ride with earplugs get some and use them on this trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
We completed our first Iron Butt this morning at 1:15 am! Thank you to everyone who posted suggestions, they were all helpful. We finished with a total of 1115 miles in 21 hours. We were plagued by rain, fog (both in the mountains of W.Va.) and super heavy traffic through Charleston N.C., but otherwise we had a great time. Time to get everything organized and off to the IBA for certification! Thanks again to everyone who contributed, and ride safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,376 Posts
Very Cool! When you get time...post up details of the ride...and any tips or suggestions to add to the others!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Trip summary:

We left Canton, Ohio at 4:15 am and rode straight down route 77 south to Columbia, South Carolina and returned to Canton at 1:15 am the following morning. Despite being an expressway only trip Route 77 provided scenic views especially through the mountains of West Virginia and Virginia. We took our time on the trip averaging 15-20 minute fuel stops, and even going to Thunder Tower HD in Columbia for shirts, shot glasses and a poker chip! The first half of the trip took about ten hours, and the return took eleven. Traffic around Charleston was slow moving on the way down, and stop-and-go on the return trip at approximately 4pm. The only other traffic issue we encountered was an accident in the mountains which slowed progress to a crawl. We rode through rain and fog in the mountains which also made for slow going.

What I learned/Tips to share: My Top Ten List

1. Ride in layers-I began my trip in jeans, hoodie and my rain jacket. At the first gas stop 150 miles into the trip I put on my rain pants and gloves. I was comfortable the entire trip by adjusting layers.

2. Heated Hand Grips are amazing! Enough said...

3. Ear plugs are a life saver-I had never ridden with plugs before on a long trip, but now I will never ride without them! No headache and less overall fatigue/ringing ears.

4. Get a good seat-I have a Sundowner and rider backrest for my Glide, and my brother added an Air Hawk cushion to the seat of his Deuce. Both of us were comfortable through the entire trip.

5. Avoid major cities if possible-Only having to deal with congestion in one city of the trip was enough for me! There is nothing more demoralizing than having to put your boots down on the highway 12 hours into a road trip. It gives you time to think about how tired you are and how much you are starting to hurt!

6. Two bikes was plenty-When I went to Wyoming last year I went solo. I enjoyed it, but the company was really appreciated on this trip. More than two bikes would have really been a chore-TLKurtz I see what you mean! Knowing the other rider is also key. My brother and I have ridden thousands of miles together and I would not have wanted to do this with someone I had not spent much riding time with.

7. Choose a destination in addition to a gas station-For us it was a dealership, but it could be a park, historic site, etc. It really helped pump us up arriving at a location and not just turning around. This was our back-up plan/destination. Bad weather prevented us from going to St. Louis to see the Arch, even if it would have been from the highway!

8. Tools/prep-We fully prepped the bikes here in the days before and had no mechanical issues. I am Obsessive when it comes to maintenance anyway so there was not much to do before hand. I did buy a tire plug kit and a small DC compressor based on suggestions posted in this thread. Thankfully, we did not need anything.

9. Water, Advil, sunscreen, chap stick, gum, Vaseline and talcum powder are your best friends!-PM me if you are curious about the last two!

10. Road Glides are the ultimate travel bikes!-I have been a Road King rider for years, but you cannot beat the Shark for comfort and stability. I'm not a huge fan of riding at night, but the Day Lighters on my Glide are amazing.


Final thoughts:

I have done many long distance trips in the past, but this was by far the most challenging because it is an endurance test. Just like everyone commented this challenge is very doable if you use common sense and take some time to prepare. In hindsight, I would have tried to pack a day earlier so I was able to get more sleep before we left-I only got about 4.5 hours. Also, next time I will pack a hoodless sweat shirt, so if it rains the hood does not wick the moisture down your back under your rain gear! This is a lesson I learned long ago, but was cruelly reminded of in the mountains of West Virginia when it began to rain. 24 hours is a lot more time than it initially seems to be, so take your time and enjoy the ride. I am excided to try an IBA Bun Burner next
time!

A sincere THANKS goes out to all of you who posted and offered suggestions and advice! I used every single one of them in one way or another!

Enjoy the miles and ride safe!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
Glad to hear everything went well and your first one is out of the way successfully!

I am plotting my first IBA run for the end of this month.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Thanks Hutch, lot of fun and many lessons learned. I was looking at the coast to coast trips and thinking one might be on the docket soon...or the Great Lakes rides, like you said very addicting!
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top