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I am taking my 13 CVO roadglide from NC to TX in late march. Going to leave on a Wednesday morning, hope to arrive Friday at some point. 1449 miles round trip. Staying in TX with some brothers for the weekend, then back on the road to NC Monday for another 1449 miles. I have never made this kind of haul. My bike is in good condition and ready for the ride, just not sure if I am LOL.

Looking for some tips on what to expect, how I am gonna feel, any recommendations of this is should do/wear/have to make this ride more comfortable etc. this will be 3k miles in a week's time and im sure will be hard on me. All input is welcomed.
 

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Make it comfortable

I would guess at that time of year heat will not be a big factor but cold may be. I use "Gator Skins" or "Freeze Out" long sleeve and long johns. I find the glove liners to be too constricting, but my hands are the first to get cold so I use them if I have to.
If you don't have the lower fairings on then the soft lowers from HD are leg and foot savers in the cold snaps.
GPS takes the worry out of being lost. I use the Garmin and load music to play through bike stereo. In the western states when it says next turn 350 miles it can be a bit disconcerting though.
Put a water bottle holder on the handle bars so you can stay hydrated. Don't overlook that. Snack bars can be a life saver as well as jerky if you prefer.
Not required but a small digi camera hung on a neck strap can come in handy. I know we all have cell phones but you don't want to be waving yours around while riding.
Stop when you are tired even if its not as far as you planned to get that day. Next day may be longer if it works that way.
Enjoy the ride.
 

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I am taking my 13 CVO roadglide from NC to TX in late march. Going to leave on a Wednesday morning, hope to arrive Friday at some point. 1449 miles round trip. Staying in TX with some brothers for the weekend, then back on the road to NC Monday for another 1449 miles. I have never made this kind of haul. My bike is in good condition and ready for the ride, just not sure if I am LOL.

Looking for some tips on what to expect, how I am gonna feel, any recommendations of this is should do/wear/have to make this ride more comfortable etc. this will be 3k miles in a week's time and im sure will be hard on me. All input is welcomed.
You are looking at 3 days of ~500 miles per day in the saddle. Figure an average speed of 50 mph, that's 10 hours of just riding, not including fuel stops, lunch, rest stops etc. Those 500 miles will turn into 12 hours very fast. I know 50mph seems like a low average but believe me you can take it to the bank. If you can do all interstate hwys then your average speed will be higher but if there are any two lane roads or cities that you can't bypass your average will be pretty close to 50mph.

For long distance riding I prefer comfort and function over form. Make sure your seat fits you well. To get the kind of mileage you want out of a day, your seat and leg position has to be priority 1. I also recommend LD Comfort underwear or something similar. No seams = a happy a$$, seams in your underwear can be uncomfortable after hours of riding.

Have good quality rain gear. Murphy's law says if you have it with you, you won't need it. The cost of good quality rain gear is long forgotten vs the soaking wet money in your pocket and a wet crotch from wearing cheap rain gear.

Your physical condition has a lot to do with this as well. Your core should be strong to help with the long days in the saddle. If it isn't now, you have some time to make it better. Some simple exercises will help with this, squats with light weights, balance exercises all go a long way to all day comfort.

Don't eat heavy meals during the day on the road, digestion of big meals will make you sleepy. Eat small snacks of protein, fruit and carbs at your fuel stops, hydrate well at your fuel stops and in between.

I have a cup/insulated mug holder on my handlebars. Easy access to hydration makes it better. I recommend an energy drink after lunch usually to help keep you awake, it works for me. Don't guzzle the whole thing down but sip at it slowly over an hour or two. When you're tired pull over, rest for a minimum of 15 minutes. Tired driving is just as dangerous as drunk driving

If you can plan your route using google maps or the HD ride planner. This will help with fuel stops and accommodation along the way. It also helps to identify route delays from construction or tolls.

"Be prepared" is not just a motto for the boy scouts.

Calgaryglide
 

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I make a trip or 2 every month in the spring - Fall seasons to NJ..410 miles each way.. I totally agree on the 500 mile thing..You lose 20 minutes minimum everytime you stop to gas, eat or even just use the bathroom if you use rest areas..I do the energy drinks after 1st gas stop... my bladder must be the size of a walnut..That trip takes me , on average, 7 hours..75 MPH on turnpike..
 

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Did a 3200 mile trip last June. 650 was the most miles in any day and I was in the saddle 12 hours on the super slab. I prefer 2 lane roads but then can only do about 350 a day depending on where. As others have said if you do 500 per day that will be around 10 hours a day. Good luck, have fun and ride safe.
 

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My longest ride is about 1200 in three days, on my old bike. Seat was miserable, upgraded before the next trip and it was a Godsend.

Did 500 miles on the RGU once, but just a one day trip, not sure if it was because the bike was 15 years newer, or if going from a batwing to a RGU was the difference but the RGU made the trip a breeze.

Others have said and I second:
1. Hydration-often overlooked, especially in cold weather
2. Rain Gear-My Frog Toggs are reasonably priced and work well
3. Temperature control, all day is different than even a couple of hours, layer up
4. Gloves-make sure you have good ones of various weight

I would reccomend working your way up, if you can do several 3-4 hundred days leading up to your trip you may learn some more about what you need. My first trip was early in the year and my body wasn't prepared. Did a similar trip about a month later, new seat and my body was better conditioned for it.
 

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I didn't see anyone suggest a FF or modular helmet. Having the protection from the elements is high on my list. I sunburn bad and very quickly so I cover up. I also have a helmet comm system that I stream music from my I phone. Helps to make slab riding pass quicker I also wear ear plus and just turn up the volume.
I am in my early 50's and love coffee so I pee often after drinking it. So I wait till on the road for 2 hrs before stopping to get gas and pee then have my 1st coffee.
Hydrate hydrate hydrate, after stopping for the day till bed time.
 

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All of the above. One thing I generally do is pick a distance to travel before stopping. ill generally shoot for 120 miles at a whack. its doable. youll likely need gas at that point so a 15-20 minute stop isn't wasted. pull in grab some go juice (for you and the bike) coffee or a water and a bag of peanuts or something and stretch your legs. usually I don't get lunch on those long rides, I just snack all day with protein loaded stuff.

I also allow for stretching out. highway pegs have been on every bike Ihave ever owned. I had them put on at the dealer In NC when I bought my 15.i told them I wouldn't buy the bike unless they installed them before I left. Good luck man. enjoy the ride.
 

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A lot of good advice above, make sure you have a roadside assistance plan also. If you wait until June you can do it for SW5. .......ijs. :cool:
 

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I rode a 2004 Super Glide from TN/NC line to Dallas Texas in November, 2013. Rode it straight through 970 miles overnight. I did so thinking it would be reasonably easy after several 1,000 mile rides on my Roadie. By Nashville, I was hating life and ready to park the damn thing on the side of the road and hitch hike the rest of the way home. I was never so glad to ride Hester like I was to SWIV.

You will be fine on a Road Glide. Ride it tank-to-tank, taking a break every 200-240 miles (your mileage may vary). A few fill-ups on each of two days' riding and you're done. If you're close on mileage, I'd do fresh oil before you go. Load your tires with Ride-On and fill them with nitrogen. Get a Reda 1-gallon gas can for your saddle bag. You might not need it, but better safe than sorry and you never know when you'll have an opportunity to share it with a stranded motorist. Take extra bunjy cords and quality rain gear. Kitchen trash bags make cheap, disposable rain gators.

I swig a 5-Hour energy shot before my morning departure and chew on beef jerky throughout the day. Audiobooks and album collections make long slab rides pass quicker. On my way up to Alaska, I listened to every Led Zeppelin album in order of release. Take extra phone/camera charging cables.

If your route into Texas takes you across I-30 towards Dallas, I have a spare room, tools, and a lift.
 

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I got turned around somewhere near Dallas late at night in the rain and got no cell service .So I won't trust that anymore carry a cheap updated GPS just in case . Also a small plug kit with compressor or co2 filler comes in handy.
 

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EVERYTHING posted so far is excellent. I have a couple of alternatives you should consider.
- Gerbing heated gear. I have a heated jacket. Some people like the heated gloves in addition. My hands stay warm, so I don't need the gloves.

- For hydration I use a Camelback in a tank bag so I can sip water as needed. I wear a modular helmet, so a water bottle doesn't work for me.

- Seat comfort. In addition to having the right handlebars and seat, consider using a Airhawk seat pad. I've had no discomfort from sitting since getting an Airhawk. I would have been uncomfortable on Iron Butt rides without it.

- Keep your head clear. Long distance riding requires a lot of brain activity. You are constantly processing all sorts of conditions. When you get cold or tired your brain starts to lose efficiency and it's harder to process the inputs. I find that Ibuprofen helps blood circulation to the brain. Also, stopping for a meal (but not heavy food) will do wonders for your brain.

The mantra for long distance riding should be, "comfort, comfort, comfort." All the mods you do and all the things you take with you should serve to make you comfortable in the saddle. If you aren't comfortable you will focus on what hurts and not on road conditions.

Finally, stay in the saddle. You can't make miles if you aren't in the saddle riding.

P.S. Go to the Iron Butt association website and look at their list of tips for long distance riding.
 

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Great suggestions but I always stop every 90 to 100 miles if only to walk stand up and walk around the motorcycle. A 5 minute break every hour to hour and a half helps me stay refreshed all day. Also, do as many miles as you can that first day. Each day in the saddle feels a little longer.

GPS and tons of music helps the miles go by and I always try to find a good local lunch stop to break up the day.

I love long distance riding on two lane highways and is why I have a motorcycle.
 

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Last October, my wife and I rode from Howell, Michigan, (east of Lansing) to Houston, Texas and back. We left on a Saturday and returned on the following Saturday. We left Lansing at 2 pm and made Effingham, Illinois by 9 pm (395 Miles). Left Effingham around 8 the next morning and rode to Marshall, Texas (655 miles). Arrived in Marshall at 9 pm. Left Marshall the next day at 10 am and arrived in Magnolia by 2 pm. (221 Miles). We did the return trip (1350 miles) in 2 days. My observations are as follows.

Dress warmer than you think and take both cold weather gear and rain gear. Don't forget the full face helmet or face shield for the shorty if you just can't bring yourself to wear a full face. Once you hit rain, you'll thank me!

Make sure mama is warm. No matter what you can put up with, it isn't worth the strain if mama isn't happy.

Don't press. We were worn out at the end of each day. If your plan is to get there and have fun then get there. If you want to enjoy the ride, take your time.

If you are on an ultra, the CB is definitely a plus. Learn how to use it and communicate with the truckers about traffic, road conditions, eating joints, ect.

Headsets to communicate with your passenger are a plus, they help break up the monotony but can also bite you in the a$$ if she gets uncomfortable.

Don't pack a lot of clothes. two or three pair of jeans max, and one or two shirts. You can always wash clothes and buy t shirts along the way. Underwear and socks are another matter! Soap and shampoo can be had at any hotel and you usually get more than you can use so I don't pack that either.

Take a good tool kit, first aid kit and service manual - just in case!

Fill up at no less than a quarter tank unless you meticulously plan out the trip and are certain every gas station you plan on stopping at IS OPEN, OR CARRY A SPARE FUEL CAN. (don't ask How I know).

Heated gear works! if you have it great, If not, buy mama's first! It ain't cheap so make sure she's set and then you can get yours after she sees what a great investment it really is!

Enjoy the trip, That's why we ride!
 

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I have done many long distance trips myself the one thing I swear to is the riders backrest is a must have on any long trip just gives you something to lean back on. Make sure it's adjusted to your liking if you never used one before they are adjustable and a little adjustment goes a long way. Enjoy the ride and take your time it's not the cannonball run!!


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Oh, and if you're taking I 10 through Louisiana, Stop at the western edge of the Atchafalaya basin in the town of Breaux Bridge, and hit up the Boudin shop and country store for the best shrimp, crawfish or Boudin po' boy you'll ever have. I have traveled the world my friend from Hawaii to Israel, Denmark to Turkey and all over these United states and nobody serves a better po' boy, nobody. It's right off the freeway and next to Landry's restaurant.
 

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Oh, and if you're taking I 10 through Louisiana, Stop at the western edge of the Atchafalaya basin in the town of Breaux Bridge, and hit up the Boudin shop and country store for the best shrimp, crawfish or Boudin po' boy you'll ever have. I have traveled the world my friend from Hawaii to Israel, Denmark to Turkey and all over these United states and nobody serves a better po' boy, nobody. It's right off the freeway and next to Landry's restaurant.
It's just past my breakfast time but that made my mouth water !
Been 30 years since I was down that way but I remember the good eats in the south !
 

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First,get Ld underware or bike riding shorts then I never leave home without Harleys circulator seat pad,keeps air between you and the seat,if you try it you wont leave home without it.the extra gas tank(Shrug's post) is a good idea,(used mine twice for other people),works great and no fumes.keep fluids going in even when you don't think you need them,don't worry about staying in the saddle til you drop, enjoy the ride,stop and walk around some.plan the route enough to know where you should be but not so much you loose site of "the ride",get off the slab some to see the country,you can't see much from the highway doing 80.Bring another coat or sweatshirt, after a while it gets colder then you think riding for a long period.Sit back,throw your feet up on the pegs and go!
 

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One of the main things to be concerned about and hasn't been mention is security.
When filling the bike at as gas station or any other time you leave the bike LOCK THE IGNITION even if you are only away from the bike for a few minutes.
Get a alarm pager at your HD dealer, they have a battery pager and a rechargeable pager, I use the rechargeable one. Keep it activated and with you all the time when away from the bike.
Take the pager into the motel room and have it on a mode that will wake you if someone is messing with your bike, I put mine on vibrate and clip it to the neck of my T-shirt.
I take a cable and lock and run it through the rear wheel and through the frame right behind the rear cylinder when parking at the motel for the night.
Use a disc brake lock on the front wheel.
Get motels that you can park the bike in front of your room if you can.
If you have any detachable items on the bike such as backrest or tour pak take them off and put them in your motel room for the night.
Lock your saddlebag lids too.
Make sure you set the bikes security override code to YOUR CODE and learn or write down the security access proceedure and keep it in your wallet in case you have to access the bike if you lost your keys. HD sets the security code from the factory at 11111 and all experienced bike thieves know this.
There is nothing worst then stopping for a rest stop/gas fill and see someone riding away on your bike or waking up in the morning and having your bike gone. :eek:
Have a nice safe trip.
 

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Bike Security, damn I knew I forgot something.

For most of us experience is the thing you gain right after you needed it the most. Example; taking the disc lock off the front brake before you fire up the bike.

All great advice up above, hopefully we haven't scared you out of making the trip. Take a little from each post and your own experiences and you will be fine. Each and every long trip that I do I learn something more about what to take, what not to take and where I can source what I need along the way.

Each of us has different parameters. Mine are fuel and bed. My brain says I have to know where I will get fuel and where I will lay my head at night. For many others all they need is a direction to go, I am extremely envious of that type of mental freedom and clarity, yes there is clarity in just choosing a direction and being free to just go, maybe someday I will have it.

Have a great trip, you deserve it, ride safe and TAKE PICTURES! No pictures; didn't happen (we're kinda like anglers that way, you can tell the story but no evidence will make us skeptical)

Calgaryglide
 
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