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Discussion Starter #1
Just wanted to share my recent pick up. Been wanting one for quite some time and sometimes the stars align. Nice 1943 Springfield that was re-arsenaled in 54. WW2 period correct Springfield trigger group and a nicely patinaed H&R stock with the proper DOD stamp and sans serif proof "P". It's an amazing rifle that shoots like a dream. I only wish it could talk, the stories it could tell.
 

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Never owned one but I always enjoyed shooting at the range with the ones a friend has. Those were dead nuts on paper. Nice find and thank your lucky stars you found a good one!
 

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I own an M1 Garand

My Dad was a Korean War veteran and he left me his.
Tear down showed trigger group from 1942, Anniston Armory marks, and a Korean replacement barrel.
My Dad had an interesting take on pristine M1s.
1) They were weapons of WW2 and Korea, the battle weapons faced awful environmental conditions in Pacific Island Jungles, Korean and European theater winters. Tracer use burned barrels out easily within a year as cleaning and lubrication pales in the face of phosphorous destruction.
2) The really pretty M1s were probably not issued theater weapons. They are likely manufactured from select parts. So pretty isn't authentic in the weapons of war.

Anyway, I have thought of making it a showpiece, but it would be "George Washington's Axe, with the head only replaced twice, and the handle only replaced three times."
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My Dad was a Korean War veteran and he left me his.
Tear down showed trigger group from 1942, Anniston Armory marks, and a Korean replacement barrel.
My Dad had an interesting take on pristine M1s.
1) They were weapons of WW2 and Korea, the battle weapons faced awful environmental conditions in Pacific Island Jungles, Korean and European theater winters. Tracer use burned barrels out easily within a year as cleaning and lubrication pales in the face of phosphorous destruction.
2) The really pretty M1s were probably not issued theater weapons. They are likely manufactured from select parts. So pretty isn't authentic in the weapons of war.

Anyway, I have thought of making it a showpiece, but it would be "George Washington's Axe, with the head only replaced twice, and the handle only replaced three times."
True, they really didn't care about matching numbers or matching manufactures for that matter. It was pretty much strip 'em down, replace what needs to be, slap them back together and get them back in the hands of the guys that needed them. The only "correct" ones are in the Springfield museum. The best that we can hope for is period correct. Such a soft shooting rifle for a 30-06 and just a joy to shoot. I'm just happy to be a caretaker for this amazing piece of history.
 

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US Rifle, Caliber 30, M1. High School ROTC. We had M1's with no firing pins. They would still snap your thumb off if you were not careful.

That, and a 1911, are about the only guns I am interested in owning.

What was the acquisition process like?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
US Rifle, Caliber 30, M1. High School ROTC. We had M1's with no firing pins. They would still snap your thumb off if you were not careful.

That, and a 1911, are about the only guns I am interested in owning.

What was the acquisition process like?
I went through the CMP and it wasn't bad. You need to provide proof of citizenship (birth certificate and drivers license), proof of a firearms safety course (I used my CCW) or be active military or LEO, membership to an approved organization (I joined the Garand Collectors Association for $25) have some forms notarized and mail off your order with a check or credit card info. It sounds like a lot of legwork but honestly it took me about a half hour to compile what I needed. Lead time is about a month to process and ship orders currently and the best part is no FFL needed, they FedEx next day to your house because the background and NICS check is done through the CMP.
 

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Nice piece! I’m always on the lookout! I have a WW 2 bring back Mauser that works great. Amazing the craftsmanship in those weapons, and based on such an old yet proven design.
 

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Yeah I got the M1 thumb in jarhead ROTC several times , agree ONG , them are two I only care about also ..

I was wondering about CMP , I have never been a club member , so maybe I will join something like the Garand club to pick up so of the stuff they offer up ever so often ..
 

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I went through the CMP and it wasn't bad. You need to provide proof of citizenship (birth certificate and drivers license), proof of a firearms safety course (I used my CCW) or be active military or LEO, membership to an approved organization (I joined the Garand Collectors Association for $25) have some forms notarized and mail off your order with a check or credit card info. It sounds like a lot of legwork but honestly it took me about a half hour to compile what I needed. Lead time is about a month to process and ship orders currently and the best part is no FFL needed, they FedEx next day to your house because the background and NICS check is done through the CMP.
My neighbor bought one from them a few years ago. He got one bored in .308
Shoots sweet.
 

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My neighbor bought one from them a few years ago. He got one bored in .308
Shoots sweet.
Tell you neighbor to have that rifle inspected by a high end gunsmith. If it was rebarrelled and had the gas system reworked, then its fine. If it was just rebarreled, as many were out in the world, it needs the gas system reworked, to slow the bolt down. The only 7.62 NATO conversions that are to be trusted at first glance are the ones Baretta did for the Iti army.

If it's a 60's USN conversion, it has a bushing in the chamber to make it into a 7.62 NATO. The bushing has a limited life, and will not last as long as the gauges say the barrel is serviceable. Also its 7.62 NATO, not .308. This is one of the riffles that it really makes a difference on. The conversions were discarded because of excessive bolt velocity under some conditions. And higher pressure .308 is only going to make that worse.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Tell you neighbor to have that rifle inspected by a high end gunsmith. If it was rebarrelled and had the gas system reworked, then its fine. If it was just rebarreled, as many were out in the world, it needs the gas system reworked, to slow the bolt down. The only 7.62 NATO conversions that are to be trusted at first glance are the ones Baretta did for the Iti army.

If it's a 60's USN conversion, it has a bushing in the chamber to make it into a 7.62 NATO. The bushing has a limited life, and will not last as long as the gauges say the barrel is serviceable. Also its 7.62 NATO, not .308. This is one of the riffles that it really makes a difference on. The conversions were discarded because of excessive bolt velocity under some conditions. And higher pressure .308 is only going to make that worse.
If it was bought through the CMP it was converted by them using a new Criterion barrel so it should be good to go, they do good work.
 

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I went through the CMP and it wasn't bad. You need to provide proof of citizenship (birth certificate and drivers license), proof of a firearms safety course (I used my CCW) or be active military or LEO, membership to an approved organization (I joined the Garand Collectors Association for $25) have some forms notarized and mail off your order with a check or credit card info. It sounds like a lot of legwork but honestly it took me about a half hour to compile what I needed. Lead time is about a month to process and ship orders currently and the best part is no FFL needed, they FedEx next day to your house because the background and NICS check is done through the CMP.
How long did it take for your Garand Collectors Association membership to be processed?
 

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Tell you neighbor to have that rifle inspected by a high end gunsmith. If it was rebarrelled and had the gas system reworked, then its fine. If it was just rebarreled, as many were out in the world, it needs the gas system reworked, to slow the bolt down. The only 7.62 NATO conversions that are to be trusted at first glance are the ones Baretta did for the Iti army.

If it's a 60's USN conversion, it has a bushing in the chamber to make it into a 7.62 NATO. The bushing has a limited life, and will not last as long as the gauges say the barrel is serviceable. Also its 7.62 NATO, not .308. This is one of the riffles that it really makes a difference on. The conversions were discarded because of excessive bolt velocity under some conditions. And higher pressure .308 is only going to make that worse.
Ill pass on the info, thanks. He said .308 ,not 7.62 NATO. Not sure if he was mistaken .
 

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Discussion Starter #17
How long did it take for your Garand Collectors Association membership to be processed?
It took a couple weeks to get my card and membership packet. That said, when you signup online they give you a receipt with your membership number. I confirmed that that with the CMP that a copy of the receipt satisfies the requirement for a group membership. Also if you decide to purchase through them I recommend setting up an e-store account with them, It enables you to check and monitor the status of your order. They're supposed to send an email when your order ships but my experience is that sometimes that doesn't happen. FedEx requires a signature, so you'll want to make sure that someone is there to sign for it.
 

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Woo Hoo. Got my order ready. Just need to get to the Credit Union to have it notarized. I went for one with a new barrel, to avoid any issues there. I may never even shoot it, but it pays to be cautious.

Since I am over 60, no need to provide proof of marksmanship. One less thing to worry about.
 

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Woo Hoo. Got my order ready. Just need to get to the Credit Union to have it notarized. I went for one with a new barrel, to avoid any issues there. I may never even shoot it, but it pays to be cautious.

Since I am over 60, no need to provide proof of marksmanship. One less thing to worry about.
Sweet, like I mentioned previously the Criterion barrels are really nice. I went with a service grade and my barrel measured 1 on the muzzle end and a 2 at the throat for erosion (well within spec). I've only had her out to 100 meters but was more than impressed with the accuracy especially with my ageing eyes. Congrats on your impending purchase, keep in mind that once you shoot it, that "ping" becomes addictive so start stocking up on M2 ball now if you don't reload!
 

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Congrats! They're certainly addictive; I've owned a half-dozen or so over the years, but I'm down to only 1 now (my favorite IHC). Sweet shooters for sure.

Good luck with it, and stock up on ammo/en-blocs!

-WRM
 
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