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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello, time for a Compensator upgrade on my 2010 RGC. been reading a lot about upgrading to a SE Conp, or Baker. Also reading on the Vulcan works eliminator. Was curious if I can get pros and cons from you guys who have experience with this. I got 50000 miles on her and ride long trips. I just want a reliable and comfortable fix. Thanks for any info.
Also PS, any preferences on clutches, while I have her open......
Also should have added that she is a completely stock 96 other than pipe,air, and tuner. But if I cannot afford a new bike a upgraded displacement could be in my future.
 

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Hello, time for a Compensator upgrade on my 2010 RGC. been reading a lot about upgrading to a SE Conp, or Baker. Also reading on the Vulcan works eliminator. Was curious if I can get pros and cons from you guys who have experience with this. I got 50000 miles on her and ride long trips. I just want a reliable and comfortable fix. Thanks for any info.
Also PS, any preferences on clutches, while I have her open......
Look at your inner primary bearing; any pits, grooves, etc. replace. Also look at the rubber grommet on the wires for the alternator, front of primary, they do breakdown and then weep oil. Unfortunately you have to replace the alternator for this fix.
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As for to comp or not to comp, that depends on what the scooter is used for. For a scooter making less than 120/120, that is used for more than a few thousand miles a year, I think you should run the comp. All of the wear and tear on the comp prevented wear and tear elsewhere. But that's a personal choice.

As to which comp, you'll need to check the sprocket shaft run out first. I like the Baker comp better and the SE. But the Baker comp is not very tolerant of run out in the crank. The SE makes more noise after the new wears off, but holds up better on a high run out shaft.

While you are in there, think about swapping out to an adjustable chain tensioner.
 

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As for to comp or not to comp, that depends on what the scooter is used for. For a scooter making less than 120/120, that is used for more than a few thousand miles a year, I think you should run the comp. All of the wear and tear on the comp prevented wear and tear elsewhere. But that's a personal choice.

As to which comp, you'll need to check the sprocket shaft run out first. I like the Baker comp better and the SE. But the Baker comp is not very tolerant of run out in the crank. The SE makes more noise after the new wears off, but holds up better on a high run out shaft.

While you are in there, think about swapping out to an adjustable chain tensioner.
Are you talking about the Baker manual chain tensioner ? I also looked on Baker's Web page and it says they are back ordered till some time in 19. I wonder if they are re-engineering their comp.
 

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Are you talking about the Baker manual chain tensioner ? I also looked on Baker's Web page and it says they are back ordered till some time in 19. I wonder if they are re-engineering their comp.
That would be one choice. I run that one and I'm not totally happy with it. When I put the upgrade kit on it, there was some pretty obvious signs of deflection. And I'm not convinced the kit is enough to stop it. Also every time it needs more than an adjustment, the chain has to come off. And like the old adjusters, the teeth are a little course to always get a good adjustment. Were I to need a new one I would probably try the V-Twin piece.

V-Twin Manufacturing - This kit allows precise adjustment of the primary chain and creates less drag and loss of power resulting from the stock spring loaded assembly.

As to what Baker is up to, I'll have to call and find out.
 

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I've got about 15k on the SE comp in my 10 and am quite happy with it. I do have a tendency to launch her quite hard rather often, but it's so far showing no signs of wear.
 

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I've got 50k on the Vulcan on my 2010 RGC with no problems. 10k with FM 107 kit.
Any differences in how it feels at lower rpms with the Vulcan as opposed to a comp? Been thinking about switching mine out to a solid sprocket next time around.
 

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Any differences in how it feels at lower rpms with the Vulcan as opposed to a comp? Been thinking about switching mine out to a solid sprocket next time around.[/QUOTE] Not that I noticed. It does have 95K miles and never been faster.
 

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I've got 50k on the Vulcan on my 2010 RGC with no problems. 10k with FM 107 kit.
FDR's RGC, even though I don't own a Road Glide, I registered so I could pick your brain on a few questions. It sounds like you have been riding with a solid compensator sprocket for quite a few miles now, the most of anyone I have found on any forum that discusses this subject. Mostly what I find is "speculation" on what could go wrong if it is used instead of a compensator, including scissoring the pressed crankshaft, damaging the transmission, etc. I have a '09 Road King with the first generation 96ci compensator and it is toast. I do have the rubber isolator inside the rear wheel hub that in itself acts like a bit of a compensator. Have you heard of anyone having complete failures due to using a solid compensator? How different do the pulses from the engine feel between one and the other? Have you had thoughts of removing the solid and going back to a compensator? Thanks.
 

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FDR's RGC, even though I don't own a Road Glide, I registered so I could pick your brain on a few questions. It sounds like you have been riding with a solid compensator sprocket for quite a few miles now, the most of anyone I have found on any forum that discusses this subject. Mostly what I find is "speculation" on what could go wrong if it is used instead of a compensator, including scissoring the pressed crankshaft, damaging the transmission, etc. I have a '09 Road King with the first generation 96ci compensator and it is toast. I do have the rubber isolator inside the rear wheel hub that in itself acts like a bit of a compensator. Have you heard of anyone having complete failures due to using a solid compensator? How different do the pulses from the engine feel between one and the other? Have you had thoughts of removing the solid and going back to a compensator? Thanks.
I've eliminated my compensator on my 2016 RGU, running with S&S 585 easy start cams, Arlen Ness inverted big sucker, Bassani True Dual Down Under, and SE Cannons with FullSac SE 2.25 baffles.

She gets scoots and has great pick up and go at highway speeds to get out of the way. I disassembled and measured the pinion shaft run out and it was 0.0048. Unless you go with massive HP and torque over 150 torque and HP, I don't think scissoring is an issue. That said, any first year press fit cranks I probably wouldn't try, but 09 had a few years of experience on the design and improvement from the press fit crank first came out.

I have now run a total of about 3,500 miles with this setup and my RGU runs smoother, starts and shuts down without issue and doesn't make all that grabble sound in the primary. I wouldn't go back to using a compensator after experiencing the compensator eliminator sprocket.
 
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