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Discussion Starter #1
I'm new to touring bikes, and bikes with stereos, so I'm completely lost when it comes to upgrading mobile audio. Please excuse my ignorance.BUT.... I recently installed some speakers (no aMP at this time) I soldered the connections, GOT EVERYTHING put back together after listening to then to "make sure" the connections were good... But when I went for a test ride, the sound coming from the speakers sounded like it was being played on a record. There was piping and cracking (like static). The ironic thing is, it only happens while riding. Never when it's just sitting there...

Any opinions on what I need to do... Check?

I'm not ANYWHERE familiar with mobile audio, as I am with Home Audio...

Any help would be Greatly Appreciated!

Jay

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Whats the speaker model? What source are you using (CD/AUX/RADIO)? Did you ceck your connections to make sure theyre correct polarity and not loose? Youll get a "hallway effect" if ones correct polarity and the others not. The static sound could be a loose coonection.

If all you changed was speakers then the speakers have to be the culprit.
 

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+1 with the check connections and polarity. I have the stock radio, polk 6.5 and no amp and its a vast improvement over the stock speakers. I can hear clearly up to about 80mph. Granted its not as good as it could be with an amp but definately better than stock speakers
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It doesn't matfer if I listen to Radio,CD, Aux, via Bluetooth for Music off of my phone.... I KNOW the connections are secure....on the speaker end, but I extended the wires and butt connected at that point.
The speakers are ALL that I changed...
My question is.... Why does it only have "static and popping sounds" with riding..... If it were "wrong" shouldn't it do it ALL of the time.... If all I do is turn the switch on, and listen to radio, cd, our aux... It doesn't make the sound....
Stock head unit
No amp



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These are 4 ohm speakers and depending on the year of your Bike the Harley system is 2 ohm. You will need to get an amp to run these speakers or change the speakers to the Polk MM651 model. These are 2.7 Ohms. The Rockford Fosgate PBR300X2 would be a great start with either speaker. To fully enjoy your speakers at speed you will need an amp. The HK unit doesn't have a strong enough signal to push 4 ohm speakers.
 

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Wont matter if theyre 4 ohm or 2 ohm. The reason its doing it only while riding is that at one of your points of connection its loose. Its losing connection with the vibration of the bike.
 

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Wont matter if theyre 4 ohm or 2 ohm. The reason its doing it only while riding is that at one of your points of connection its loose. Its losing connection with the vibration of the bike.
I agree, the OP said he used butt connectors to extend the wires, that's the first place I'd be looking.

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I agree, the OP said he used butt connectors to extend the wires, that's the first place I'd be looking.

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The OP also stated He KNOWS his connections are secure. That said Venomized and Dbell are both right usually the first place to start is ground and work your way to all the connections. But since he said he's done that I have to take the man's word for it and assume thers's another problem. All opinions are good guys. . . But I do disagree with Venomized. If he's running 4 ohm speakers on a 2 ohm system he's got problems.
 

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But I do disagree with Venomized. If he's running 4 ohm speakers on a 2 ohm system he's got problems.
Then you must not know audio very well. All that running a 4 ohm speaker in a 2 ohm system is going to do is give the user less power and less volume. It does not hurt to run a higher Impedance speaker on a lower impedance system. Now vice versa you would burn the systems amplifier up if it is not stable for that impedance load. You can run 4 or 8 ohm on a 2 ohm system without an issue. Now on an 8 or 4 ohm system, unless the amplifier is stable to that impedance load itll over heat the amplifier and end up ruining it.

The OP stated he butt connected and all but the symtpoms of his issue leads to a loose connection. Take a speaker and loosely fit the connections then play it and tap the wire and youll get a popping and static sound just like the OP describes.
 

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Then you must not know audio very well. All that running a 4 ohm speaker in a 2 ohm system is going to do is give the user less power and less volume. It does not hurt to run a higher Impedance speaker on a lower impedance system. Now vice versa you would burn the systems amplifier up if it is not stable for that impedance load. You can run 4 or 8 ohm on a 2 ohm system without an issue. Now on an 8 or 4 ohm system, unless the amplifier is stable to that impedance load itll over heat the amplifier and end up ruining it.

The OP stated he butt connected and all but the symtpoms of his issue leads to a loose connection. Take a speaker and loosely fit the connections then play it and tap the wire and youll get a popping and static sound just like the OP describes.
No worries Sir! We'll just go with the OPS bike is shaking his wires loose. You win and I have no idea what I'm talking about. Bilbo please disregard my post. Good luck with your connections. I hope it solves your issue.
 

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No worries Sir! We'll just go with the OPS bike is shaking his wires loose. You win and I have no idea what I'm talking about. Bilbo please disregard my post. Good luck with your connections. I hope it solves your issue.
Dont take it as an insult Im just giving info on it.
 

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Dont take it as an insult Im just giving info on it.
No insult Sir . . . We just have a difference of opinion. The same question has been asked many times: Here is an answer from a crutchfield advisor on the subject:

Actually, if you put a 4 ohm speaker load on a 2 ohm amp/HU, you’re going to cause a lot of havoc on your amp/HU. If your impedance doesn't match, it’s going to cause a major power drain; your amp/HU will overheat, and will eventually fail. If you MUST use the amp/HU you have installed now, then the best solution would be to run a second set of speakers in series, if possible. If you daisy chain two 4 ohm speakers, it will drop the load to 2 ohms. In order to do this, you would run your speaker wire from your amp/HU to the first speaker, and then run a second line from the first speaker to the second speaker.

No way am I saying this is the OP's issue with his connections I was just giving him another possible solution since he said he thought his connections were ok. You are most likely right, It's probably the ground or a loose connection. But I would never tell you that you did'nt know audio because I disagreed with your opinion. I'm 57 years old and been jacking around with audio since I was 14. I'm not an expert but I have learned a few things over the years.
 

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Gannicus, the Crutchfield advisor either heard you wrong, or told you wrong, what you wrote is incorrect. I'm definitely not trying to insult anybody, but what Venomized said is true. If you reread what you have the Crutcfield advisor saying, you'll see it's actually contradictory. Just always remember if the load has more impedance than the amp.... you're not hurting anything, (your just not getting optimum power). If the load has less impedance than the amp, that's when you're in trouble because you are trying to draw more power than the amp is designed for, thus heating and eventually ruining the amp. Impedance is the actual resistance (ohms) just in case there was any confusion.

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No insult Sir . . . We just have a difference of opinion. The same question has been asked many times: Here is an answer from a crutchfield advisor on the subject:

Actually, if you put a 4 ohm speaker load on a 2 ohm amp/HU, you’re going to cause a lot of havoc on your amp/HU. If your impedance doesn't match, it’s going to cause a major power drain; your amp/HU will overheat, and will eventually fail. If you MUST use the amp/HU you have installed now, then the best solution would be to run a second set of speakers in series, if possible. If you daisy chain two 4 ohm speakers, it will drop the load to 2 ohms. In order to do this, you would run your speaker wire from your amp/HU to the first speaker, and then run a second line from the first speaker to the second speaker.

No way am I saying this is the OP's issue with his connections I was just giving him another possible solution since he said he thought his connections were ok. You are most likely right, It's probably the ground or a loose connection. But I would never tell you that you did'nt know audio because I disagreed with your opinion. I'm 57 years old and been jacking around with audio since I was 14. I'm not an expert but I have learned a few things over the years.
Well Im going to say the crutchfield advisor should not be giving advice then. You may have misread what he/she said as well. I was an installer for 4 years. I was MECP silver certified and went through Installers Institute. Im 32 years old and have trophys that date back to when I was 16 for SPL drags and SQ+ classes. I was just trying to take any worng leading out of the OPs mind about impedance rating being wrong and part of the problem.

Gannicus, the Crutchfield advisor either heard you wrong, or told you wrong, what you wrote is incorrect. I'm definitely not trying to insult anybody, but what Venomized said is true. If you reread what you have the Crutcfield advisor saying, you'll see it's actually contradictory. Just always remember if the load has more impedance than the amp.... you're not hurting anything, (your just not getting optimum power). If the load has less impedance than the amp, that's when you're in trouble because you are trying to draw more power than the amp is designed for, thus heating and eventually ruining the amp. Impedance is the actual resistance (ohms) just in case there was any confusion.

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Thanks dbell.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I will be adding an amp. (I'm aware that even great speakers CAN sound like crap if they don't have sufficient power) but I just wanted to install the newer speakers and get rid of the 11 year old stock ones. I just didn't realize I'd run into the problem I did...
Having said that... (and since I know NOTHING about hooking up mobile electronics, I'll be doing homework and asking install questions once I get my amp...)

Thanks Guys,
I appreciate the info.

Y'all are basically trying to teach Ray Charles how to drive with me and mobile audio...

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