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I wear cheapie safety glasses (wrap around) clear set in glove box for night riding tinted for daytime. Total investment $5 and optically correct!
 

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Hey man, why do you want something cheap? I don't want to be a dick, but seriously we're talking your Mark 1 Eye-balls, not that easy to replace you know :). You'll appreciate the quailty glasses when a pebble hits your eye at 60 mph... Sure, the "cheapos" might give you some sort of shatter-proof guarantee but I wouldn't trust it. Furthermore the "cheapos" don't have a scratch-proof surface so with time they'll degrade optically reducing your line of sight etc. Riding at night you obvisiously want something that make you see as good as an owl! :)
I use a pair of Oakley M-frame 2.0 Standard issue (MIL-SPEC); for night-riding with clear lenses. They retail at US$ 180,00 but well worth the money!

 

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I've been wearing Wiley X Brick Sunglasses for the past two years and have been very pleased with them until recently when the foam inner piece wore out twice.
I have two pairs of lenses for them, one dark and one clear. I change them out when it gets dark.
I just ordered a pair of 7 Eye Churuda Photohromatic Sunglasses based on Macabra11's earlier post and am awaiting for them to arrive.
I liked the look of their foam inner piece and the idea of not having to change lenses when it gets dark.
I'll post a review when I get to ride with them.
Mike U.
 

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Hey man, why do you want something cheap? I don't want to be a dick, but seriously we're talking your Mark 1 Eye-balls, not that easy to replace you know :). You'll appreciate the quailty glasses when a pebble hits your eye at 60 mph... Sure, the "cheapos" might give you some sort of shatter-proof guarantee but I wouldn't trust it. Furthermore the "cheapos" don't have a scratch-proof surface so with time they'll degrade optically reducing your line of sight etc. Riding at night you obvisiously want something that make you see as good as an owl! :)
I use a pair of Oakley M-frame 2.0 Standard issue (MIL-SPEC); for night-riding with clear lenses. They retail at US$ 180,00 but well worth the money!

Actually, not so much.

In order to be considered "Safety Glasses" - prescription ground or plano - no part of the lens can be less than 2mm (or 3mm depending on the standard) thick. Oakleys on the other hand are designed to be lightweight and typically are between 1-1.5mm. they can also (depending on the lab) can go as low as .06mm for prescription lenses at their thinnest part...in favor of weight.

Not to mention that the rule of thumb markup for eyeglass frames is 300%, which can go as high as 500-600% for name brand "Designer" frames. Yet either way you'll most likely still be dealing with standard CR39 lenses ... Which are reasonably "Shatter Resistant" depending on how thick the are.


Before I went into IT, I spend 5 years running an optical surfacing lab. And one of my specialties was custom fitting prescription lenses into designer frames like the Oakley wraparounds.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Hey man, why do you want something cheap? I don't want to be a dick, but seriously we're talking your Mark 1 Eye-balls, not that easy to replace you know
. You'll appreciate the quailty glasses when a pebble hits your eye at 60 mph... Sure, the "cheapos" might give you some sort of shatter-proof guarantee but I wouldn't trust it. Furthermore the "cheapos" don't have a scratch-proof surface so with time they'll degrade optically reducing your line of sight etc. Riding at night you obvisiously want something that make you see as good as an owl!

I use a pair of Oakley M-frame 2.0 Standard issue (MIL-SPEC); for night-riding with clear lenses. They retail at US$ 180,00 but well worth the money!

Actually, not so much.

In order to be considered "Safety Glasses" - prescription ground or plano - no part of the lens can be less than 2mm (or 3mm depending on the standard) thick. Oakleys on the other hand are designed to be lightweight and typically are between 1-1.5mm. they can also (depending on the lab) can go as low as .06mm for prescription lenses at their thinnest part...in favor of weight.

Not to mention that the rule of thumb markup for eyeglass frames is 300%, which can go as high as 500-600% for name brand "Designer" frames. Yet either way you'll most likely still be dealing with standard CR39 lenses ... Which are reasonably "Shatter Resistant" depending on how thick the are.


Before I went into IT, I spend 5 years running an optical surfacing lab. And one of my specialties was custom fitting prescription lenses into designer frames like the Oakley wraparounds.
Do you have a brand you like or can recommend?
 

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I've been wearing Wiley X Brick Sunglasses for the past two years and have been very pleased with them until recently when the foam inner piece wore out twice.
I have two pairs of lenses for them, one dark and one clear. I change them out when it gets dark.
I just ordered a pair of 7 Eye Churuda Photohromatic Sunglasses based on Macabra11's earlier post and am awaiting for them to arrive.
I liked the look of their foam inner piece and the idea of not having to change lenses when it gets dark.
I'll post a review when I get to ride with them.
Mike U.
I've had my Bricks for 7 or 8 years. When the foam wears out, I get another foam piece (it's a wear item). These glasses have been all over this country and Canada, and I won't replace them until they become unrepairable.
 

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Actually, not so much.

In order to be considered "Safety Glasses" - prescription ground or plano - no part of the lens can be less than 2mm (or 3mm depending on the standard) thick. Oakleys on the other hand are designed to be lightweight and typically are between 1-1.5mm. they can also (depending on the lab) can go as low as .06mm for prescription lenses at their thinnest part...in favor of weight.

Not to mention that the rule of thumb markup for eyeglass frames is 300%, which can go as high as 500-600% for name brand "Designer" frames. Yet either way you'll most likely still be dealing with standard CR39 lenses ... Which are reasonably "Shatter Resistant" depending on how thick the are.


Before I went into IT, I spend 5 years running an optical surfacing lab. And one of my specialties was custom fitting prescription lenses into designer frames like the Oakley wraparounds.
He-he; I'm not going to challenge Mr. Eyeball here :D
The Army (RNA) adopted those glasses after thorough field-testing so I believe there is a difference. But by all means, paying a lot of dollars does not guarantee a quality product. Especially those brands that get their products from the same low-cost fabric in China as the $ 5 product at Walmart... JMO
 

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Do you have a brand you like or can recommend?
Not really, I've been out of it for quite a few years. Really the point I was making is that high dollar doesn't necessarily equal high quality. So don't get trapped in the $300 "high-end" riding glasses trap ... Because you're really just getting raped by the staggering markup on those things.

Here's the thing:
You walk into an eyeglass store and see all of the fancy frames available with prices ranging from $50 to $500+...and most likely - like most people - wonder where does decent quality end.

Now the shop has to carry hundreds of frames...to cater to everyone's tastes. So the cost of their inventory skyrockets very quickly. Even though their actual cost for any given frame is (on average) about $10. So the reality of it is that you pay are really paying s 300%+ markup on the frames you buy to make up for all the stagnant inventory that isn't/didn't/won't sell. Neat huh?

So since the specs in question will most likely spend much of their time being packed somewhere...it's best to go with something "durable" with a spring hinge that can handle being "folded funny" and crushed a bit. Metal frames wont soften and deform, and offer better peripheral vision. While plastic frames can get hot enough to deform (letting the lenses pop out) if/when they get hot enough sitting in a saddlebag over the summer waiting to be needed...

So go to any optical shop, wander by their "old people" (70's) *style frames section and grab whatever frame style you like. Have them put in some plano lenses (assuming you don't wear prescription lenses), and you out the door for $100 or less with the same actual optical quality of the top dollar - bend over and love me - "riding" glasses.



*Screw fashion (it's night time FFS), the 70's style frames tend to run a bit larger and offer better eye protection. And they always include a few of the classic Aviator style frames...which are a very functional style.
 

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I have had the Wiley X transitions for about 6 months now and they are far and above better than any other glasses I've used. (Wiley X makes the branded glasses for HD.)
I ended up buying mine through my ophthalmologist since I was going prescription also. If I had done prescription / transition lenses through HD they would have cost around $500. I ended up paying $230 so I'm glad I ended up going that route.
It's great to have one pair of glasses for day & night and they are very well made so fit & function are perfect.
 

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I too wear Wiley X. I've had a transition pair for over ten years. As I get older my eye sight gets worse. I use to be able to see good enough with them but then it became uncomfortable to not see clearly to feel safe. So I bought a new pair with my prescription and they are awesome. My wife now wears my old pair and loves them too. Like all prescription eye glasses they are expensive but the comfort is worth it. I recommend them to all my friends. Which is all of you!


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