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I have a 2012 rgc with 45000 miles, so from what I have read my rear shocks are pretty well trash, they sure clunk a lot anyway. I see HD 039 Ohlins on amazon for $617 with free shipping. Is this a good way to go ?
 

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I also have a 2012 RGC ... and I have a followup complimentary question on Ohlin shocks:

Comparing the #3 and #6 which are both 'separated' gas/oil shocks:

- both say that they are externally adjustable Compression/Rebound, Spring Preload length ... while the #6 has the remote reservoir.

- If they are both similarly adjustable, both separated, what are the advantages of the #6 (at almost 2x the price of the #3)? Simply the ease and quickness of adjustment? If so, what is 'harder' about the adjustment to the #3? Or, is there some other improved ride quality aspect the remote reservoir also provides over the #3? Is there anyone in the forum that runs with the #6 and do you feel there's some tangible benefit vs the #3 that has value for the additional cost?
 

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a ressie shock will keep the oil cooler which will help resist fade. on a touring bike i wouldn't spend the extra coin for them. if you're racing atv's, definitely...


i recently got a used set of ohlins off a forum member. they were set up for weight a little lower than what we are, and i was worried they would bottom out and ride low in their travel range. i was wrong. they are way too stiff and i don't think they ride any better than the cheap progressives that they replaced. i'm not bashing anyone's work, but what i will say is---> if you're spending good money on a new set of shocks, ask if the guy(girl, company, whoever)will stand behind their work. meaning if their valving sucks will they revalve them again for free(or cost of shipping)??? i know some manufacturers give a 30 day valving warranty on new shocks(or did do it).
 

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Clarification

a ressie shock will keep the oil cooler which will help resist fade. on a touring bike i wouldn't spend the extra coin for them. if you're racing atv's, definitely...


i recently got a used set of ohlins off a forum member. they were set up for weight a little lower than what we are, and i was worried they would bottom out and ride low in their travel range. i was wrong. they are way too stiff and i don't think they ride any better than the cheap progressives that they replaced. i'm not bashing anyone's work, but what i will say is---> if you're spending good money on a new set of shocks, ask if the guy(girl, company, whoever)will stand behind their work. meaning if their valving sucks will they revalve them again for free(or cost of shipping)??? i know some manufacturers give a 30 day valving warranty on new shocks(or did do it).
Let me field this question.

The difference between the remote reservoir & an internal reservoir is entirely different than described. If anyone wishes to know than please go to my shock page and click on the link called "How They Work".

I designed the #6 as an much better riding option than the #3 series I suggested to OhlinsUSA somewhere around 2009 or 2010 to Mike Hensley. Ohlins had no externally adjustable or separated shocks (for combating cavitation under extreme riding style) for touring models at that time. I looked at modifying the design of a shock found on a BMW front fork. That is where this #3 shock comes from.

A #3 uses an internal inline separator piston above the main piston. The #6 has the separator piston outside of the shock body thus allowing for a much larger stroke. A shorter stroke is achieved when putting an object in the way of the main piston.

The #3 series has an open bleed compression/rebound adjuster which, using a needle valve to adjust the restriction of the oil that bypasses the main piston thus making the shock have less resistance to change ("weaker") but they are not independently adjustable, but set in the factory (designed in) ratio. Turn the compression/rebound knob in to close the needle valve and both the compression and rebound changes as well as visa versa.

The #6 shocks have a very sophisticated separate compression valve at the top of the reservoir where compression can be set independently of the rebound. The quality of this compression valving is such that this compression system was designed for F-1 auto racing until exchanged for the newer design system called the twin tube/TTX. When using both systems for I designed & adapted for Harley's, the present remote ressy system was more comfortable and smoother than the 2X more expensive TTX system. The compression & rebound valving on a TTX must be located next to the piggyback (only) ressy therefor making this system unsuitable for any further development for the Touring models (saddle bag clearance. I designed and used the remote hose mount ressy system for the touring line where utilizing a piggyback behind the bags is just short of foolhardy. I mounted the ressy on a hose for clearance issues as well as ease of adjustment. The hose does allow the shock oil o cool but most certainly not the only reason for my design.

These #6 shocks coupled with my 30mm Ohlins cartridge system (in 49mm forks) is by far the absolute best handling and most comfortable suspension system available for FLT's.

I hope I have cleared up all incorrect information found on this post.

i recently got a used set of ohlins off a forum member. they were set up for weight a little lower than what we are, and i was worried they would bottom out and ride low in their travel range. i was wrong. they are way too stiff and i don't think they ride any better than the cheap progressives that they replaced.
You purchased used shocks. I would suggest that you go to your local/online vendor and have your shocks built and choose the proper spring application for you if necessary. Make sure the shop has been doing Harley Davidson applications for a while and actually know what they are doing. I would suggest that you contact the person you purchased your shocks from and have him support you on installing and setting up your shocks properly first. By reading your post I would venture a educated guess (I have sold & built well over a thousand shocks) that you should read and understand the basic fundamentals on how your shocks work as well as how to install/set them up. What is inside of your shocks as well as the condition is anyone's guess which is and most definitely can be a major contributing factor. Unless you know what you are working with no one can definitively give you the magic bullet on getting the shocks to work properly.

The overwhelming majority of my customers who purchased Ohlins from me do not have the same experience as you do. That is because of the support and mounting instructions I provide. The person you gave your money to is that person to you. For you to state "they are way too stiff and i don't think they ride any better than the cheap progressives that they replaced" can be true only if the condition of the shocks are defective and/or the installation and set up is wrong. All responsibility for both of these possible conditions are yours alone and not the Ohlins shocks. I go to the popular motorcycle rally's as far away from Fort Lauderdale FL as Sturgis S.D. to support all of my customers who are having setting or installation issues. On every occasion 100% of my customers left with the results they required or they do not leave intill that goal is reached. None of those results are remotely similar to yours. Good luck on the fix.
 

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I was about to type the same thing. Actually, I wasn't because I don't know $hit about suspension, but Howard clearly does (as exemplified above) and he made Hester ride like a dream when he built my Ohlins.
 

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What Howard said! :D
 

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Out riding this weekend with the lady. Bottomed out twice with the *[email protected]#& stock shocks, and it actually caused the horn bracket to snap (which I never seen before, different story for a different time) !!!:mad::mad:

I call uncle on the stock crap!!

Actually, I'm calling Howard today!:D

I am praying he can work a miracle before i leave in 2 weeks :rolleyes:
 

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Out riding this weekend with the lady. Bottomed out twice with the *[email protected]#& stock shocks, and it actually caused the horn bracket to snap (which I never seen before, different story for a different time) !!!:mad::mad:

I call uncle on the stock crap!!

Actually, I'm calling Howard today!:D

I am praying he can work a miracle before i leave in 2 weeks :rolleyes:
you have seen the light! and my finger is still bleeding!
 

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Let me field this question.

The difference between the remote reservoir & an internal reservoir is entirely different than described. If anyone wishes to know than please go to my shock page and click on the link called "How They Work".

I designed the #6 as an much better riding option than the #3 series I suggested to OhlinsUSA somewhere around 2009 or 2010 to Mike Hensley. Ohlins had no externally adjustable or separated shocks (for combating cavitation under extreme riding style) for touring models at that time. I looked at modifying the design of a shock found on a BMW front fork. That is where this #3 shock comes from.

A #3 uses an internal inline separator piston above the main piston. The #6 has the separator piston outside of the shock body thus allowing for a much larger stroke. A shorter stroke is achieved when putting an object in the way of the main piston.

The #3 series has an open bleed compression/rebound adjuster which, using a needle valve to adjust the restriction of the oil that bypasses the main piston thus making the shock have less resistance to change ("weaker") but they are not independently adjustable, but set in the factory (designed in) ratio. Turn the compression/rebound knob in to close the needle valve and both the compression and rebound changes as well as visa versa.

The #6 shocks have a very sophisticated separate compression valve at the top of the reservoir where compression can be set independently of the rebound. The quality of this compression valving is such that this compression system was designed for F-1 auto racing until exchanged for the newer design system called the twin tube/TTX. When using both systems for I designed & adapted for Harley's, the present remote ressy system was more comfortable and smoother than the 2X more expensive TTX system. The compression & rebound valving on a TTX must be located next to the piggyback (only) ressy therefor making this system unsuitable for any further development for the Touring models (saddle bag clearance. I designed and used the remote hose mount ressy system for the touring line where utilizing a piggyback behind the bags is just short of foolhardy. I mounted the ressy on a hose for clearance issues as well as ease of adjustment. The hose does allow the shock oil o cool but most certainly not the only reason for my design.

These #6 shocks coupled with my 30mm Ohlins cartridge system (in 49mm forks) is by far the absolute best handling and most comfortable suspension system available for FLT's.

I hope I have cleared up all incorrect information found on this post.

You purchased used shocks. I would suggest that you go to your local/online vendor and have your shocks built and choose the proper spring application for you if necessary. Make sure the shop has been doing Harley Davidson applications for a while and actually know what they are doing. I would suggest that you contact the person you purchased your shocks from and have him support you on installing and setting up your shocks properly first. By reading your post I would venture a educated guess (I have sold & built well over a thousand shocks) that you should read and understand the basic fundamentals on how your shocks work as well as how to install/set them up. What is inside of your shocks as well as the condition is anyone's guess which is and most definitely can be a major contributing factor. Unless you know what you are working with no one can definitively give you the magic bullet on getting the shocks to work properly.

The overwhelming majority of my customers who purchased Ohlins from me do not have the same experience as you do. That is because of the support and mounting instructions I provide. The person you gave your money to is that person to you. For you to state "they are way too stiff and i don't think they ride any better than the cheap progressives that they replaced" can be true only if the condition of the shocks are defective and/or the installation and set up is wrong. All responsibility for both of these possible conditions are yours alone and not the Ohlins shocks. I go to the popular motorcycle rally's as far away from Fort Lauderdale FL as Sturgis S.D. to support all of my customers who are having setting or installation issues. On every occasion 100% of my customers left with the results they required or they do not leave intill that goal is reached. None of those results are remotely similar to yours. Good luck on the fix.
I will validate what Howard says here. Originally bought my shocks 2 1/2 years ago and put around 25,000 miles on them. I lost 165 lbs during that process and called Howard and he completely rebuilt my shocks for me for my new weight. After putting 1000 miles on them I had my bike in the shop (unfortunately because I blew up my 120r..) and the tech called Howard to "dial in' my broken in shocks. Howard took him step by step to make sure he set them up perfectly. It took a couple of m months to get my new 124 installed in which time I rented 3 bikes (each for a weekend) and really forgot how good the Ohlins were. Totally night and day difference from stock.
 

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Received my Ohlin 2.5's from Howard a week or so ago and put them on before we went on a trip last weekend. We put on 1,500 miles in four days and what a difference! The OEM air shocks were terrible. Then I tried a set of Progressive 440's that had been good on my old Road King, but on the RGU if I did not set the preload high, they bottomed out all the time and with the preload high they road stiff. I tried heavier weight oil in the OEM shocks which helped a bit, but they still bottomed out and rode hard. With the 2.5 the bike was transformed! No more clenching every time we saw a bump coming. I think in the entire 1,500 we bottomed out once. Most bumps were hardly noticed, tracked better in the curves, less wobble, all in all much improved ride and handling. I left them as set by Howard for most of the trip as they were not broken in. I did up the preload a few clicks. Now I will set the preload for single rider, two up and two up with luggage and play with the compression adjustment .

I just ca't say enough about how much better they are. Dump you OEM and get a set of Howard's Ohlins. If you can afford it go for the 6's, but the 2.5's are womderful!
 
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I have a 2013 RGC, I want to get the most comfort out of my bike. should I go with the #2 adjustable or the #3#3? #2 adjustable have 93mm stroke and the #3#3 have 77mm stroke. They look the same but are they the same for adjustablity? I guess the seperator piston is the difference? I ride hard but dont race. I live in NY ant the streets SUCK ASS. Major potholes! Any help would be appriciated........
 

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I have a 2013 RGC, I want to get the most comfort out of my bike. should I go with the #2 adjustable or the #3#3? #2 adjustable have 93mm stroke and the #3#3 have 77mm stroke. They look the same but are they the same for adjustablity? I guess the seperator piston is the difference? I ride hard but dont race. I live in NY ant the streets SUCK ASS. Major potholes! Any help would be appriciated........
The #2 and #3 are both great shocks , you are correct the separator piston shortens the stroke on the #3 but with the sweep valve it gives a better ride , you can't go wrong with either choice , I'd base my decision off a- budget and b- do you want the sweep valve for fine tuning it ? Often times guys want to bolt them on set the sag and ride , so the sweep valve is a bother to them , others appreciate it. Good Luck
 
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