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As some of ya know , in the way back , I had a Pan and a couple Shovels , and as some of you know I have been threatening to find one .. Good thing I am busted right now , check these out on cycletrader within 400 miles of me , one is an hour away ..

JtB


one hour away on this 65

sweet low



sweet EL


always weak for supers , really like this one
 

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As some of ya know , in the way back , I had a Pan and a couple Shovels , and as some of you know I have been threatening to find one .. Good thing I am busted right now , check these out on cycletrader within 400 miles of me , one is an hour away ..

JtB


one hour away on this 65

sweet low



sweet EL


always weak for supers , really like this one
Nice Finds Jack!
Mike U.
 

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The 50 I love- but altimetly, what do you do with it? Can't ride it to work. Could go bar hopping but worried about it getting stolen or broke down. Cant use it to do errands.

So besides riding it around a little and taking it to shows, whats it good for? Seriously. It's lots of cash just sitting there. For that much you could have allot nicer and newer bike that you could use more.

Sent from my SM-N970U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #10
yeah the fifty I would pass on , and it's an EL , not a bad thing but I'd rather have a 74 ..
There's a 64 FL that is really sharp , wouldn't even put a price in the ad ..

My favs are the 65 FLH and the 74 Super and the 78 low , really love the 74 super , but I had a 71 and always dug supers

JtB
 

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I've been to the dealer in Atlanta that has the '50. He has some really nice bikes, lots of old BMWs and other European bikes mostly, but they're usually priced at top dollar to reflect they're condition or rareity.

I think the '80 FLH would make a nice starting point for a bobber build. I wouldn't buy that one just because of the amount of motor work it's had. He lost me at "high compression pistons".
 
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Almost every year has something unique that can cause problems.
Most don’t know the FXR Shovelhead didn’t have a belt final drive. It was I closed chain. Parts are hard to find. But working on the top end was easy, still in the frame. The frame was designed for the EVO so I could take the front head off without removing the fuel tank.
 

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I think the '80 FLH would make a nice starting point for a bobber build. I wouldn't buy that one just because of the amount of motor work it's had. He lost me at "high compression pistons".
The typical Weisco "high compression" piston kit for a Shovelhead is only 9:1, and is quite manageable (e.g. no starting issues or other ill behavior). I had a set in my 82 FLT that I rode to work daily back then, and it was stone axe reliable. I wouldn't worry about that one a bit.
 

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Joker/JTB - thanks for the experienced based knowledge. Good to know. I just automatically shy away from pumped up rebuilds unless I know who did the wrenching. Too many horror stories over the years by friends and family of hopped up motors having less durability than a freshly made pizza. I have no tolerance for things that go "boom"!
 
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Saw this on the Moto Guzzi Forum.

I got a pile of complete worn out Shovelhead shite from a buddy for a cheap price and decided to build a chopper out of it. It ended up being one of the most fun bike builds ever. Since I always shoot for the museum quality, rivet counting type of restorations, building the chopper was a freeing experience.

I was quite an honor to have my chop selected to be in the Mama Tried bike show in Milwaukee right out of the chute. Later that year I rode it to Detroit to see the Oily Souls bike show. The bike ended up winning Best In Show - Ride In category out of hundreds of bikes.

I set this one up in the standard chopper hard core format; jockey shift, suicide foot clutch, open belt primary, and no front brake. Since I was only going to a rear brake I wanted it to be reliable so I deviated from tradition and went with a disc. You haven't really experienced motorcycle riding at its most elemental until you master a foot clutch, jockey shift bike. It is a fun skill once mastered, but a bit intimidating until it becomes second nature. An old fart like myself that can still handle a rigid frame, jockey shifter is kind of rare these days, at least around this area.

Try it, you will like it!!!
:evil:


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Discussion Starter #19
Thats sweet there , I see he did a dual plug set up also .. Yup I can tell ya , jock shift and suicide clutch are a trick on two wheels , love it , just simple and clean , my style there , two piece steel fat bobs rock ..

JtB
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Almost every year has something unique that can cause problems.
Most don’t know the FXR Shovelhead didn’t have a belt final drive. It was I closed chain. Parts are hard to find. But working on the top end was easy, still in the frame. The frame was designed for the EVO so I could take the front head off without removing the fuel tank.
FXR didn't have the enclosed chain , FL's did , my 84 EVO TG had enclosed chain .. Wish they had kept enclosed chain myself ..

I think , going by memory here , the Sturgis was the first belt final drive in the modern era , and I believe it had belt primary ..

JtB
 
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