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Discussion Starter #1
I'm considering riding RT 66 from Calif to Chicago. I live in So. Cal so I would start from Los Angeles and head north east. Here's my question. Is RT66 basically all straight highway? I'm not big on riding the slab and prefer taking back roads and twisty mountain roads. I'm not sure this is the trip for me. Any input is appreciated; especially from those who have actually ridden the route.
 

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There are many guide books that will help you with planning your route. Rt 66 exists in lots of places and in other places it has been replaced with an Interstate.

If you have a Garmin 500 or 600 series Zumo, you can get a GPS guide from Spot It Out. Hutmo suggested it for the Gypsy Tour.

http://shop.spotitout.com/products/route66-r2g-garmin
 

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I've ridden Rt. 66 several times.

Well, riding from SoCal through Oklahoma, Route 66 is pretty much a "Hit and Miss" proposition and not very well documented. Riding around SoCal, you can see that from LA to San Bernardino it is city streets that are not marked very well. Going through from LA east on Foothill Blvd. to San Bernardino, where the name changed to 5th St. Then up to Cajon Pass. Route 66 runs partly up from 5th St. in San Bernardino on Mt Vernon Blvd. Take Cajon Blvd. turn off just before W. Highland. It follows along I-215 but ends where I-15/I-215 meet. Route 66 is covered by this exchange. It begins at the next exit north of the exchange (Cajon Blvd.) and follows I-15 to Cleghorn Rd. It is pretty much coved until you get through Victorville. Route 66 is now called National Trails Hwy in Victorville. It goes out to Barstow. Following I-40 east, the Route 66 areas are marked (still National Trails) where to exit. The most complete of these rides is the road to Amboy. Just make sure you have gas. It crosses I-40 at Goffs Rd. and comes back to I-40. Near Needles, it is covered by I-40. In Arizona it is marked AZ-66 out to Kingman and through Seligman. From here out through Oklahoma, It is just I-40 Business. So you will not get much Route 66 except cut offs. You may need a book that is dedicated to Route 66 to see much. It is better to "have and not need", than to "need and not have".

When you get to Missouri and Illinois, Route 66 is well marked and the Route 66 Preservation Society is hard at work saving much of the "Mother Road. I really enjoyed riding route 66. Just give it a lot of time.
 

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When you get into Missouri, a lot of 66 was used for I-44, as it was already 4 lanes and divided. There are quite a few of the old segments still around. They will be state highways with numbers or letters. You can find many of them signed, some even with different dates as to when they were 66. Google Maps has many of them marked as well.

Wikipedia has a good listing of what is still there as well.

I would, however, avoid this stretch of the old highway...


Unless you are on the Gypsy Tour. They will probably hit this stretch.
 

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66 in California, especially from Barstow east is rough,rough,rough. It is not well maintained (typical of California roads). It is rideable but not always at speed. you will spend a lot of time dodging potholes till you get into Arizona.
 

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As you come to the end of OK the old route headed into Kansas for a bit and ran through Baxter Springs and then to Galena and then into Joplin MO. A good part of the old road is still there. In fact in the movie Cars much of Radiator Springs was taken from Galena and the old tow truck that Tow Mater was modeled after sits in front of an old gas station that is now a cafe called "4 women on the route". You can get a picture of you and your bike right next to the real Tow Mater. Worth a stop. Then ride right into Joplin.
 

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Route 66 is now called National Trails Hwy in Victorville. It goes out to Barstow. Following I-40 east, the Route 66 areas are marked (still National Trails) where to exit.
Damn! I spent a lost week in Adelento a few years back and rode some parts of 66 when going to victorville and Barstow a few times without even realizing it! Thanks for the info!

If you ride 66 and don't know it, does it still count??? :)
 

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I ride 66 from OKC to the Hard Rock Hotel in Tulsa a lot. It's a nice paved road, goes through several smaller towns which have restaurants and watering holes.... I like the ride, it's a little curvy, nice change since most Oklahoma roads are straight..... at least until you hit eastern Oklahoma.......
 

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Damn! I spent a lost week in Adelento a few years back and rode some parts of 66 when going to victorville and Barstow a few times without even realizing it! Thanks for the info!

If you ride 66 and don't know it, does it still count??? :)
I have found that my Ole' mind is a wealth of useless knowledge.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you for all of the replies and information. This doesn't sound like the ride for me. I think I'm going to ride to the Grand Canyon and then to Yellowstone.
 

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Thank you for all of the replies and information. This doesn't sound like the ride for me. I think I'm going to ride to the Grand Canyon and then to Yellowstone.
Yea, out west it is pretty dull. Grand Canyon will have a lot more to see.
But when traveling east/west, it makes the trip better. And when you get to MO/east, it is more interesting.
 
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