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its a pretty simple job, I try and rock the caliper back and forth on the rotor to open up the pads so it comes off easier, pull the little clip off of the top and unscrew the holding pin, then squeeze the brakes with the old pads and clean with brake cleaner, then with the old pads I put a screwdriver in to open up the gap again and replace the pads, then bolt the caliper back up, I don't have the torque spec handy but I definitely use a torque wrench on the caliper bolts. its about a 5-10 minute per caliper job.
 

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^^^^what he said ^^^^ Also you may want to put a small amount of brake silicone lubricant on the back of the pads and slide pins. It will help with future squealing with will happen. Pretty easy to do
 

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+1^^^^^ What they said!!
Also there is no need to remove the brake fluid reservoir when compressing the caliper pistons and you don't need to bleed the brakes either you just pump them back up after the work is done.
 
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that's the craziest thing I ever heard! I've changed all three sets on my last abs bike twice and all three three sets a week or so ago on this bike and didn't throw any codes.

Thats great! I read in my manual that the Dealer puts the bike on a diagnostic computer after they change the brakes on ABS bikes. Since I'm not a certified mechanic I decided to call a great independent shop and ask the owner what he does. He suggested I disconnect the battery and since that's not very hard to do I decided to follow his advice. Kinda makes sense since ABS have an electronic element to them. What would be silly (to me) would have been not to follow his advice and throw a code and take it to the dealer to have them correct the issue.


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+1^^^^^ What they said!!
Also there is no need to remove the brake fluid reservoir when compressing the caliper pistons and you don't need to bleed the brakes either you just pump them back up after the work is done.

No need to disconnect the battery - ABS on my bike and no issue when changing the pads. I did check the Service Manual just before writing this and it doesn't call for disconnecting the battery either. But if it makes someone feel better, it won't hurt anything either.
 

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If you want to disconnect the power you can always pull the left side cover and pull out the 40 amp master fuse.
 

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Also there is no need to remove the brake fluid reservoir when compressing the caliper pistons.
Thats not always true. If the pads get so low someone in the past may have topped off the fluid, then when compressing the pads, would cause an over flow from the reservoir. Besides its always a good idea to pop the cap and check the fluid.
If one doesnt have a vacuum bleeder and you had to remove excess fluid, you can use a lint free towel and blot the level down.
 

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Thats not always true. If the pads get so low someone in the past may have topped off the fluid, then when compressing the pads, would cause an over flow from the reservoir. Besides its always a good idea to pop the cap and check the fluid.
If one doesnt have a vacuum bleeder and you had to remove excess fluid, you can use a lint free towel and blot the level down.
There is never a reason to add brake fluid to the reservoir on a MC or an automobile unless the brake system has a leak and you're trying to make it home. The brake fluid level is a indicator of brake pad wear and the lower the brake fluid is in the reservoir the farther out the pistons are in the calipers which means the pads are wearing out. When you replace the brake pads and push the pistons back into the calipers the brake fluid level will rise going back to full.
If the brake system has no leaks the only time you need to open up the reservoir cap is when you are flushing the brake fluid.
 

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ironmark is correct again! as long as you don't squeeze the crsp out of the Pistons when you install them the fluid level should be fine if the system is in good shape, I try to push them back nice and slowly so as not to put undo pressure on the system, on a car or bike it's never been an issue for me. I think they are covering their ass when they say disconnect the battery for this type of service, it's like disconnecting the battery to change your oil


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There is never a reason to add brake fluid to the reservoir on a MC or an automobile unless the brake system has a leak and you're trying to make it home. The brake fluid level is a indicator of brake pad wear and the lower the brake fluid is in the reservoir the farther out the pistons are in the calipers which means the pads are wearing out. When you replace the brake pads and push the pistons back into the calipers the brake fluid level will rise going back to full.
If the brake system has no leaks the only time you need to open up the reservoir cap is when you are flushing the brake fluid.
ironmark is correct again! as long as you don't squeeze the crsp out of the Pistons when you install them the fluid level should be fine if the system is in good shape, I try to push them back nice and slowly so as not to put undo pressure on the system, on a car or bike it's never been an issue for me. I think they are covering their ass when they say disconnect the battery for this type of service, it's like disconnecting the battery to change your oil


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These guys are correct. If you notice the brake fluid is low and you don't have any leaks then it's a great indicator that the pads are low. Pushing the pistons back in will push the fluid back into the reservoir and back to normal levels providing the system was full to begin with.
 

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Nope not buying it. Whenever a vehicle is in a shop for inspections when they check and adjust fluids they usually top off the brake fluid because of low pads. Case in point. My son bought a used 2012 tacoma he comes by and says the brakes are squealing. I tak a look and they are below the max wear limit. After compressing the first caliper pistons the fluid level was at the bottom of the cap, and I still had the other side to do. Any shop that pad slaps and not check the fluid condition and level is not very good. Period Ive been in the business so long to know that is a no brainer.
 

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Nope not buying it. Whenever a vehicle is in a shop for inspections when they check and adjust fluids they usually top off the brake fluid because of low pads. Case in point. My son bought a used 2012 tacoma he comes by and says the brakes are squealing. I tak a look and they are below the max wear limit. After compressing the first caliper pistons the fluid level was at the bottom of the cap, and I still had the other side to do. Any shop that pad slaps and not check the fluid condition and level is not very good. Period Ive been in the business so long to know that is a no brainer.
That makes sense because you pushed the first piston in completely. If you pumped the brake pedal after you completed the one side you would've seen the fluid at a lower level. You have to remember that the pistons when operating normal, don't return completely into the caliper which is where the different fluid level will come into play. If they completely compressed everytime you took your foot off the brake then it would feel as though you had a spongy pedal. I've been a mechanic for 25 years and never had a problem. I will say though that it is necessary to flush the brake fluid from time to time because it can and does get contaminated
 

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That makes sense because you pushed the first piston in completely. If you pumped the brake pedal after you completed the one side you would've seen the fluid at a lower level. You have to remember that the pistons when operating normal, don't return completely into the caliper which is where the different fluid level will come into play. If they completely compressed everytime you took your foot off the brake then it would feel as though you had a spongy pedal. I've been a mechanic for 25 years and never had a problem. I will say though that it is necessary to flush the brake fluid from time to time because it can and does get contaminated
I wasnt talking about after pushing the pistons all the way back, I understand the level will be high and when you reset the pedal the level will go down to the correct level. In the case of the Tacoma I still had to remove fluid because it was too high, so somewhere someone added fluid as the pads got lower.
My point of my comment was that you should always check the fluid when changing pads, not just pad slap and be done with it, thats what I was alluding to. Thats how you can find contamination especially when you find someone that thought dot 3 and 5 mixes together.
 
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I wasnt talking about after pushing the pistons all the way back, I understand the level will be high and when you reset the pedal the level will go down to the correct level. In the case of the Tacoma I still had to remove fluid because it was too high, so somewhere someone added fluid as the pads got lower.
My point of my comment was that you should always check the fluid when changing pads, not just pad slap and be done with it, thats what I was alluding to. Thats how you can find contamination especially when you find someone that thought dot 3 and 5 mixes together.
It is good practice to check levels of all the fluids. Is it necessary everytime? No... Should you do it periodically? Yes...
 

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Abs

Thats great! I read in my manual that the Dealer puts the bike on a diagnostic computer after they change the brakes on ABS bikes. Since I'm not a certified mechanic I decided to call a great independent shop and ask the owner what he does. He suggested I disconnect the battery and since that's not very hard to do I decided to follow his advice. Kinda makes sense since ABS have an electronic element to them. What would be silly (to me) would have been not to follow his advice and throw a code and take it to the dealer to have them correct the issue.


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The reason the bike is hooked to the computer is that the procedure by the book is to ensure the ABS system has no air in it. The system (digital tech) cycles the ABS system to ensure that is the case. You can't truly bleed the ABS system without digital tech.
 
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