Road Glide banner

1 - 20 of 61 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Only 6k and rear pads are gone. But thats normal since i use rear brakes all the time, and only about 30% of the time i use front brakes. But thats not why i'm posting here. The work here has not been so stable lately so i don't really have any money to spare for the shop manual.

Can someone please help me out by posting directions or diagrams on how to remove rear caliper? It looks pretty similar to the car brakes, do i just need to take one bolt out and loosen another, or is there a special way to remove the caliper? Do i have to bleed the brakes or not? Please, any info will be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,605 Posts
1.remove right saddlebag.
2.If ABS equipped, carefully cut cable strap to release rear wheel speed sensor cable from brake hose to caliper.
3.remove 2 screws to release brake caliper from caliper bracket.
4.remove brake caliper from brake rotor.
NOTE: do not operate brake pedal with rear brake caliper removed.
The instructions tell you to stand the bike upright and remove the rear master cylinder reservoir cover, if you do this you have to take measures to protect the paint. I have found that it is NOT NECESSARY to remove the cover on the rear brake master cylinder reservoir, THE PISTONS WILL PUSH IN JUST FINE WITHOUT THE REMOVAL OF THE COVER.
5.alternately push each pad back until pistons are fully seated in the bores.
6. pull retaining clip from groove in pad pin.
7.remove pad pin.
8. remove the brake pads.
9. install new brake pads making sure to put the brake pad lubricant on the rear of the pads.
10. install brake pad pin with retaining clip.
11.install brake caliper onto the brake caliper bracket.
12. pump rear brake pedal to set the pads. (if you took off the cover of the rear brake reservoir you will have to put the cover back on before pumping the brake pedal, then you may have to remove the cover to fill the reservoir after setting the pads)
13.reattach the ABS cable & put the saddlebag back on.

I shorten the instruction some, but this will get you through the brake pad replacement just fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,361 Posts
Don't forget to pump your brakes up before you take off. Don't ask how I know!! :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the help, directions made my life much easier. Took me about 15-20minutes to do the whole thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,861 Posts
Thanks for asking for this information and thanks for posting. Now I will be doing mine. I can understand the tight money thing, I am having a hard time scraping up the money for the 10K service, so I will be tackling that myself for the most part and just have the dealership do the things that I can't do or don't have the tools to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
1.remove right saddlebag.
2.If ABS equipped, carefully cut cable strap to release rear wheel speed sensor cable from brake hose to caliper.
3.remove 2 screws to release brake caliper from caliper bracket.
4.remove brake caliper from brake rotor.
NOTE: do not operate brake pedal with rear brake caliper removed.
The instructions tell you to stand the bike upright and remove the rear master cylinder reservoir cover, if you do this you have to take measures to protect the paint. I have found that it is NOT NECESSARY to remove the cover on the rear brake master cylinder reservoir, THE PISTONS WILL PUSH IN JUST FINE WITHOUT THE REMOVAL OF THE COVER.
5.alternately push each pad back until pistons are fully seated in the bores.
6. pull retaining clip from groove in pad pin.
7.remove pad pin.
8. remove the brake pads.
9. install new brake pads making sure to put the brake pad lubricant on the rear of the pads.
10. install brake pad pin with retaining clip.
11.install brake caliper onto the brake caliper bracket.
12. pump rear brake pedal to set the pads. (if you took off the cover of the rear brake reservoir you will have to put the cover back on before pumping the brake pedal, then you may have to remove the cover to fill the reservoir after setting the pads)
13.reattach the ABS cable & put the saddlebag back on.

I shorten the instruction some, but this will get you through the brake pad replacement just fine.

Excellent instructions, I would suggest cleaning the pistons with brake clean before you push them in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
644 Posts
My 2010 FLTRX requires removal of the rear wheel to remove the caliper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
My 2010 FLTRX requires removal of the rear wheel to remove the caliper.
Really? I thought the same thing, but a little wiggle on the caliper did the job. It did take some more effort to put it back in, but i did get it in there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,012 Posts
Only 6k and rear pads are gone. But thats normal since i use rear brakes all the time, and only about 30% of the time i use front brakes. But thats not why i'm posting here. The work here has not been so stable lately so i don't really have any money to spare for the shop manual.

Can someone please help me out by posting directions or diagrams on how to remove rear caliper? It looks pretty similar to the car brakes, do i just need to take one bolt out and loosen another, or is there a special way to remove the caliper? Do i have to bleed the brakes or not? Please, any info will be appreciated.
I was interested to know if that kind of break wear is normal. I have over 18K miles, and both front and back look fine. I usually break by downshifting, but 6K seems kinda significant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
See, i'm an aggressive driver/rider. I go faster than most therefore i need to apply the brakes heavier than most. I also do a lot of rear brake "dragging". So i'm not really surprised that the pads went out so early, i would've expected at least 10k, but thats ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
644 Posts
I have 19,000 miles on my bike and rear pads are less than 50% worn. These pads are pretty thin. Minimum thickness os 0.016 inches. Let us know if you can get the caliper off without removing the rear wheel and how you did it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
Any recommendations on a brand for rear brake pads? Or does everyone stick with the HD pads?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,245 Posts
I have 19,000 miles on my bike and rear pads are less than 50% worn. These pads are pretty thin. Minimum thickness os 0.016 inches. Let us know if you can get the caliper off without removing the rear wheel and how you did it.
You should be able to get the caliper off without doing anything to the wheel or tire. I compressed the piston on my 09 while it was still on the bike. That will give you the wiggle room you need to, well wiggle the caliper out. The rear pads only took me 15/20 mins to do
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
You should be able to get the caliper off without doing anything to the wheel or tire. I compressed the piston on my 09 while it was still on the bike. That will give you the wiggle room you need to, well wiggle the caliper out. The rear pads only took me 15/20 mins to do
Same thing here. I was having problems at first, but as soon as I compressed the caliper everything went smooth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,737 Posts
Thanks for asking for this information and thanks for posting. Now I will be doing mine. I can understand the tight money thing, I am having a hard time scraping up the money for the 10K service, so I will be tackling that myself for the most part and just have the dealership do the things that I can't do or don't have the tools to do.
You're more than welcome to use my garage and jack to perform the maintenance. I even have a shop manual for an 09 which should be the same process. Rear brakes are pretty easy to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Any recommendations on a brand for rear brake pads? Or does everyone stick with the HD pads?
EBC Sintered pads are what we all run and sell at my shop...

Also, we always take the cap off the brake res before pushing the piston back in just so there is no pressure build up in the res and we don't blow out a seal, it is easier to do that than to replace parts we shouldn't have broken in the first place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,822 Posts
Don't forget to pump your brakes up before you take off. Don't ask how I know!! :rolleyes:
Never done that on the bike but done it on the car a few times . That first few seconds that the brake pedal is heading to the floor while the cars rolling drops your gut down and inch or two. lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
Good info thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,605 Posts
EBC Sintered pads are what we all run and sell at my shop...

Also, we always take the cap off the brake res before pushing the piston back in just so there is no pressure build up in the res and we don't blow out a seal, it is easier to do that than to replace parts we shouldn't have broken in the first place.
No need to, it is just a wasted step and you take the chance of getting brake fluid on your paint.
 
1 - 20 of 61 Posts
Top