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Discussion Starter #1
Replaced front springs on ‘16 RGU

Got the springs kit from progressive



Started removing the IGN switch and using the JIMS tools to unlock the handlebar



By removing the nut and the collar under the IGN switch, I was able to remove the instrument bezel without messing up with the “horseshoe”





Once put the leg in the jaws with a support by JIMS, I opened the cap (got the “jack in the box” effect, tourings are far more preloaded than dynas, where I had experience with)



See the difference between springs, the left is the progressive one, the right one is the HD one. The progressive is surely far more efficient by default......



Settled the oil level as instructed by progressive



Put the cap back on, to overcome the preload I had to use a ratchet sling in a creative way......



Put then everything back in smoothly, I have to say the original maintenance manual is a “must have” to do everything properly.
It took 6 hours, but I did everything step by step by the book and without having to get back on anything.




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Nicely done! Post up your results on how they feel when you get some miles on. Enjoy the ride!
 

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Got the springs kit from progressive



Started removing the IGN switch and using the JIMS tools to unlock the handlebar



By removing the nut and the collar under the IGN switch, I was able to remove the instrument bezel without messing up with the “horseshoe”





Once put the leg in the jaws with a support by JIMS, I opened the cap (got the “jack in the box” effect, tourings are far more preloaded than dynas, where I had experience with)



See the difference between springs, the left is the progressive one, the right one is the HD one. The progressive is surely far more efficient by default......



Settled the oil level as instructed by progressive



Put the cap back on, to overcome the preload I had to use a ratchet sling in a creative way......



Put then everything back in smoothly, I have to say the original maintenance manual is a “must have” to do everything properly.
It took 6 hours, but I did everything step by step by the book and without having to get back on anything.




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You made it look easy. Please post the results as I am trying to get a "softer" ride.
 

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Please let us know how much of a difference they make. Thanks.


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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Rode roughly 200 miles today, mostly mountain roads and some highway
The mix of new springs and the 15w oil came out to be a good job, no cons, just pro:
  • No more “diving” on brakes, the front smoothly go down without having to expect to hit the bottom
  • more precision in the turns, I have the progressive 490 heavy duty in the back and the softer front was not giving confidence due to the different behavior with the stiffer back. Now everything feels tuned and the bike is like on roadtrack
  • comfort; still great, I need heavy duty in the back because I’m 250 myself and I ride a lot with the ol’lady, the front instead did not need to be so strong but only a little more solid. Now I have the perfect match, tested on highway and confirmed on several town’s speed bumps.
  • price; progressive list the springs kit at roughly 110$ VS. the 500$ needed for the monotube. The springs kit has a lot of “value for money” in my view.
In the end, if you are on budget and in search of improvement solutions for your front end, you will not be disappointed by this kit
 

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Very nice report, good information! Glad you have the results you were seeking. :)
 
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Thanks for the update. I was also looking at the 2 different ways to go. I believe I will go with the spring kit also. Great write up
 

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Great job! As I understand, you did not have to disassemble lower legs or drain screw. You just swapped springs with new oil, right? What weigh of fork oil did you use? Thanks for posting this, sorry for so many questions.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Great job! As I understand, you did not have to disassemble lower legs or drain screw. You just swapped springs with new oil, right? What weigh of fork oil did you use? Thanks for posting this, sorry for so many questions.

As you said I did not disassemble the leg, I simply removed the cap and discharged the oil from there, moving the leg up and down a dozen times to be sure all the oil was discharged.
The stock suspension oil is a 10w type, I used a 15w instead to increase rigidity a little.
As said, it is important to have a good supporting tool on the vice while doing the job. The preload is quite strong to be won and I had to use a sling to win it.
No problem answering questions, we write on forums to share experiences and to make quality talking on motorcycling.
Please feel free to ask more if needed


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Discussion Starter #12
It is a metric 19mm, I presume the equivalent is a 3/4 but I would suggest to go for the 19mm for the perfect fit
 

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Thank you for sharing.I think I’m headed this direction.I talked with progressive yesterday and the guy said to cut the spacer to the top of the fork just under the cap before you thread it on.Flush with the tube.Is that correct.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thank you for sharing.I think I’m headed this direction.I talked with progressive yesterday and the guy said to cut the spacer to the top of the fork just under the cap before you thread it on.Flush with the tube.Is that correct.
I remember that within the instruction there is table where it is stated the size of the spacer for your model. Check first the applicability for your bike on their site, you’ll obtain the right part number for your model where the spacer is roughly right according to the table (I had to cut 1 centimeter only)
 

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As you said I did not disassemble the leg, I simply removed the cap and discharged the oil from there, moving the leg up and down a dozen times to be sure all the oil was discharged.
The stock suspension oil is a 10w type, I used a 15w instead to increase rigidity a little.
As said, it is important to have a good supporting tool on the vice while doing the job. The preload is quite strong to be won and I had to use a sling to win it.
No problem answering questions, we write on forums to share experiences and to make quality talking on motorcycling.
Please feel free to ask more if needed


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Removing the ignition switch isn’t necessary correct. I can just slide the forks out of the bottom?
 

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As you said I did not disassemble the leg, I simply removed the cap and discharged the oil from there, moving the leg up and down a dozen times to be sure all the oil was discharged.
The stock suspension oil is a 10w type, I used a 15w instead to increase rigidity a little.
As said, it is important to have a good supporting tool on the vice while doing the job. The preload is quite strong to be won and I had to use a sling to win it.
No problem answering questions, we write on forums to share experiences and to make quality talking on motorcycling.
Please feel free to ask more if needed


Inviato dal mio iPhone utilizzando Tapatalk
Removing the ignition switch isn’t necessary correct. I can just slide the forks out of the bottom?
If it’s a 15 the horseshoe is removable and the gauge console can be removed without removing the switch. To remove horseshoe press in on the front bottom and lift up then slide out.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Removing the ignition switch isn’t necessary correct. I can just slide the forks out of the bottom?
I did exactly what the manual said, but mine is a ‘16, don’t know about other model years.
Anyhow if you made a search the forum is plenty of people breaking the horseshoe trying alternative methods
 

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Removing the ignition switch isn’t necessary correct. I can just slide the forks out of the bottom?
I did exactly what the manual said, but mine is a ‘16, don’t know about other model years.
Anyhow if you made a search the forum is plenty of people breaking the horseshoe trying alternative methods
My switch failed on reinstall, got stuck on run and fork lock but would still rotate. Now I have to replace the entire assembly. Get the assembly off I had to remove the gauge cluster which I thought you could only do with the switch removed which I could not do after it failed. It was aligned correctly, prior to reassembly. I think it was just a mechanical failure, it was having intermittent issues. I was able to remove the horseshoe than the gauge cluster & switch assembly.
 

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Mine is also a 2016.I guess I was wondering what the purpose of removing the ignition switch had to do with removing the forks?I’ll have to find a pdf copy of the instructions and read it.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Mine is also a 2016.I guess I was wondering what the purpose of removing the ignition switch had to do with removing the forks?I’ll have to find a pdf copy of the instructions and read it.
In order to get access to the upper nuts holding the forks you have to remove the instruments dashboard and the covers beneath. According to the manual, step one is to remove the ignition switch (see also my picture sequence).

Because when you remove the switch you need to position the handlebar in the lock mode, you’ll need the tool to release the lock (see picture). Some use a screwdriver instead but then problems might appear after during reinstallation (make a quick search on forum...)

Like I said a follow the manual procedure and had zero issue. If you like working on your bike I suggest to invest in the official HD manual, it will be paid off at the 1st usage considering HD manpower costs :wink:
 
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