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Discussion Starter #1
Last years thread can be found here:
http://www.roadglide.org/showthread.php?t=26657

This thread will be a continuation of last years comedy show!!!

I can't promise that I wont install my mufflers wrong, break 10.5k wires while installing bars or cry hysterically after finding my RG on its side... but I can promise you I'll have fun and ASK lots of questions!!!

One thing I picked up last month was a digital version the my service manual.

This years plans include:
- Black out all things chrome (front end, rims, engine, foot / hand controls)
- Cams (hope to find a used set and save some $$)
- Day Makers
- Luggage wrack for my TP
- Longer Clutch cable
- Inner re-painted (due to me dropping it last year)
- Slight modification to pin stripping.
- Front brake pads
- New front tire
- Fluid change

The list is short at this point, but I expect allot of parts to be remove and sent out for powder coating.

I'll start the thread out with some before and afters from last year.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
My first purchase for the winter work was a HF table and over the past 2 days I've gotten it worthy to hold my RG!

Installed the black roll in wheel chock, grip tape on the ramp, and built wings to keep my feet firmly planted while I roll up on the table.

I even managed to get the bike on it without any drama. I'll admit it was scared shitless though... (first time ever putting a bike on a table)
 

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My first purchase for the winter work was a HF table and over the past 2 days I've gotten it worthy to hold my RG!

Installed the black roll in wheel chock, grip tape on the ramp, and built wings to keep my feet firmly planted while I roll up on the table.

I even managed to get the bike on it without any drama. I'll admit it was scared shitless though... (first time ever putting a bike on a table)
NICE!!!!!! You'll really like that tape when your backing that beast off while your getting your feet under you...... First time I did it with out the tape & the tire slid backwards...........MAJOY PUCKER factor right thar!!!!!! LOL!!!!!!

Nicely done!!!!!
 

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Dan,

Some words of advice from one rookie to another.

1. line your new table with some packing paper right on the surface under the scisssor jack. i put a few layers under mine and removed them as they got dirty with oil, grease etc. Keeps your new table cleaner longer.
2. I made a few tables out of plywood and mdf board. I got the folding table legs from Home Depot/Lowes. Tables are 24 x 72 and 24 x 48. One sheet of plywood will make 3 tables. I put all my takeoff pieces on these tables. First i lay moving blankets on top of them, Home Depot/Lowes. The long tables hold the exhaust and painted pieces, The short table holds my tools and any parts I will be reusing
3. Watch the videos from FuelMoto on doing a cam change and on putting in the adjustable pushrods. When doing your cam change, after removing the rider front floorboard and the exhaust, clean the frame, wires and brakelines behind the exhaust with a good quality cleaner/degreaser such as LPS Electrical Contact Cleaner or Spray 9. After you have that area clean, tuck some paper towel between the frame and motor under the cam cover. Put your oil change bucket under the cam cover when your crack the gasket. I had to use a dead blow hammer (3 lb sand mallet) to make the cam cover release.
4. Use a good set of cam tools to remove the old bearings and install the new ones. I have set of Georges tools that proved invaluable, especially the little cam alignment tool when removing the crank bolt and the rear camshaft bolt.
5. Remove the spark plugs to rotate the engine in 5th gear before you remove the cam cover. I used a long zip tie to re assure myself that the pistons were at TDC through the spark plug holes. You can watch the valve action through the exhaust when rotating the rear wheel to find TDC on the front cylinder when installing the front pushrods. I did this with a flashlight and listened to make sure that i had no meeting of the valves with the pistons. Just something I worried about as a rookie, making sure there was metal meeting metal.
6. If you can have a buddy to help, a second set of hands is welcome to rotate the rear wheel when lining up the timing marks to remove the chain drive from the crank to the rear cam.

Thats all I can think of for now. Good luck eh!

Calgaryglide
 

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My only words of wisdom for you would be this.

Don't ever be afraid to reach beyond your capabilities.

I recently broke the secondary belt. I had it fixed for me, but the only reason I did not want to do it myself is my Garage is not heated, and it has been one f***ing cold winter. I've never taken the primary apart, but that is no reason not to try.

Also, get a service manual. Great reference book. It may not be the best for some things (i.e. changing fork oil), but it is A method in case you get really stuck.
 

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Dan,

Some words of advice from one rookie to another.

1. line your new table with some packing paper right on the surface under the scisssor jack. i put a few layers under mine and removed them as they got dirty with oil, grease etc. Keeps your new table cleaner longer.
2. I made a few tables out of plywood and mdf board. I got the folding table legs from Home Depot/Lowes. Tables are 24 x 72 and 24 x 48. One sheet of plywood will make 3 tables. I put all my takeoff pieces on these tables. First i lay moving blankets on top of them, Home Depot/Lowes. The long tables hold the exhaust and painted pieces, The short table holds my tools and any parts I will be reusing
3. Watch the videos from FuelMoto on doing a cam change and on putting in the adjustable pushrods. When doing your cam change, after removing the rider front floorboard and the exhaust, clean the frame, wires and brakelines behind the exhaust with a good quality cleaner/degreaser such as LPS Electrical Contact Cleaner or Spray 9. After you have that area clean, tuck some paper towel between the frame and motor under the cam cover. Put your oil change bucket under the cam cover when your crack the gasket. I had to use a dead blow hammer (3 lb sand mallet) to make the cam cover release.
4. Use a good set of cam tools to remove the old bearings and install the new ones. I have set of Georges tools that proved invaluable, especially the little cam alignment tool when removing the crank bolt and the rear camshaft bolt.
5. Remove the spark plugs to rotate the engine in 5th gear before you remove the cam cover. I used a long zip tie to re assure myself that the pistons were at TDC through the spark plug holes. You can watch the valve action through the exhaust when rotating the rear wheel to find TDC on the front cylinder when installing the front pushrods. I did this with a flashlight and listened to make sure that i had no meeting of the valves with the pistons. Just something I worried about as a rookie, making sure there was metal meeting metal.
6. If you can have a buddy to help, a second set of hands is welcome to rotate the rear wheel when lining up the timing marks to remove the chain drive from the crank to the rear cam.

Thats all I can think of for now. Good luck eh!

Calgaryglide
Excellent advice, this.

Subscribed. Now... let the games begin! :)
 

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Sounds promising, subscribed.
 

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My first purchase for the winter work was a HF table and over the past 2 days I've gotten it worthy to hold my RG!

Installed the black roll in wheel chock, grip tape on the ramp, and built wings to keep my feet firmly planted while I roll up on the table.

I even managed to get the bike on it without any drama. I'll admit it was scared shitless though... (first time ever putting a bike on a table)
Nice.

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter #15
well... I'll fully dissembled and starting to collect parts to rebuild.

I'm on the fence for forks..

Looks like Ness forks will run me about 150.00 more than stock forks w/ smooth axel and HD edge-cut cans.

opt1: Ness deep cut forks w/ black cans @400

opt2: stock black forks w/ edge-cut cans and FBI smooth axel kit. @550

Progressive monotube lowering kit on order... 270 from Amazon. going to lower it -2"

Might scale back on the number of parts I send out for coating to cover the costs of the monotubes.

Also starting to research the DIY rear air setup...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well.. this build took a radical turn! I've been like a fart in a gail storm trying to decide what I wanted to do....

Parts are starting to roll in but I decided on

- Monotubes -2 for the front
- Black HD forks (thank you Jetman)
- Flush mount axle kit (from HCC)
- Flush square fork bottom kit (from HCC)
- Kury Mini boards for my wife (need to have them pc'd)
- sent of a handful of goodies to Glydnn for some blacking :)
- repainted inner
- slight adjustment to my pinstriping

and the biggest for last!

a 21" front wheel!!!
I decided on the Vivid Black contrast cut Titan from HogPro w/ matching 2pc rotors.
Here is the setup on a SG....
http://www.hogpro.com/imagebox.php?name=pic/gallery2-pic502.jpg

I know I know... what about the back. Well.. I need to plant a new $$ tree and hope to order the matching back wheel next winter. I plan on just blacking out the stock back wheel for now.

D.
 

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Love that wheel, Dan! Looking forward to continued reports of progress. My hat is off to you for taking on major mods on your own. Maybe you should hit up RR for some money tree seeds. ;)
 
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