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Discussion Starter #1
So, took the Glide out yesterday for a bit after all the Mom's day excitement died down and I had a few hours of daylight to kill - Got into a few sweepers to lean the bike over a bit and starting to get the feel of 'er after about 450 miles on it - Planning a over nighter in June where we will log about 800-900 miles and many of it is back country, long sweeping turns - My question is......how are these stock tires? - I am not going to see how far I can drag my boards and pipes down but I have also never owned a touring bike - From what i know, touring tires are more about miles and less about grip....and seem to be rather sharp edged giving little to no "oh shit" warning when you've run out of contact patch - I know what a go fast tire feels like when she is about to go and just wonder if there is anything I should know about these hunks of rubber?
 

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It's been my experience that you run out of lean angle before you run out of tire. The floorboards are your warning. Next piece to make contact is the floorboard bracket. The are bolted solidly to the frame and will unload the tires and result in a nasty case of road rash on your butt at best.
 

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I've been very pleased with the 407/408 tires. They're excellent in the rain, and do very, very well when riding with.....verve. They're not a balls-out sport-touring tire like an Angel GT, but they acquit themselves very well. I've spent hours with the bike above 5,000rpm in northwest Arkansas and the Maggie Valley area and the tires have never once been the limiting factor. As stated above, the lean angle and my inability to haul myself far enough out of the seat to the inside of the corner is what keeps me from cornering faster.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thx lads - Exactly what I wanted to hear - I have never had to chuck a 900lbs bike around before and happy to hear that hard parts hit before tires give - Not out to drag elbow but I do love me some sweepers and I have done this upcoming route before and no what beauty roads lay ahead.

Appreciate you guys !!!
 

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In no way promoting

My old RG, like many bigger bikes will and have the ability to..stand themselves Up or even pull themselves in with your basic controls
and tire feel

Then again, I ant figured out Y the lean angle ant the same on each side, if I recall the manual
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You guys Rock

Reds....was just thinking of your screen name as I am reading the HA Book by Sonny B and they talk about all the "reds" they used back in the day
 

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Stock tires are fine. You can run them as hard as the bike will go. I run them until they wear out every time I buy a new bike. Then I change out my wheels to my custom set. I usually go through a set of floorboard pans a year and have zero chicken strips on the tires (wear to the sidewall). I do move to a Dunlop American elite on the rear and a Metzeler 880 on the front when I switch the wheels out. The American elite wears much better and the Metz is stickier.
 

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I also reccomend Metzeler, German high quality tyres, that performs more like a sport- than touring-tyre. Metzeler is one of the few companies that only make mc-tyres and have been in the forefront of tyre technology for years. I had Metzeler on my Bimmer and wanted the same for my SERG – ME888 Marathon Ultra. They're not cheap and won't give you those extra miles BUT they stick like glue even on those "slippery when wet" roads!
Oh just for the record, I had a pair of Dunlops from the dealership – gave me a nasty jolt in those twistys... :eek:

(No I'm not afilliated to Metzeler but I am European and probably a little biased! :)
 

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I agree on the Metzelers. I run the ME880s on the Night Train (Metz is the only company that makes an 18" rear that'll handle the weight of the bike), and they're amazing rain tires. I ripped that bike up and down Pine Mountain, KY a few years ago and had no traction issues whatsoever.
 

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I've ran em on baggers, exclusively (cept Avons once) on baggers in the PNW (rain!) to close to 200k since '96

Spot em Kaws, Yamas, GWs or any glunkly tourer, you know they know (or the one before em knew), well know here. ....
 

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I agree on the Metzelers. I run the ME880s on the Night Train (Metz is the only company that makes an 18" rear that'll handle the weight of the bike), and they're amazing rain tires. I ripped that bike up and down Pine Mountain, KY a few years ago and had no traction issues whatsoever.
Ran metzler 880s on my '05 FXST, mh90 and 160/70-17. Loved the way that bike would dig in a corner, never once felt it slip or slide. Very secure and stable feeling. Soon as I wear out the dunlops I'm going to give metzler 888s a go on my '15 RG. Hope they are just as good.
 

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+1 on the Metzlers. I've got the 880's on my Night Rod Special, and they spank the stock Dunlops for "sticky factor". And I think they actually ride a little softer. I know it's not apples-to-apples, but I'll be doing the same when the Dunlops wear out on on my Roadie.

I've swapped out the stock Dunlops for Avon Cobras on a couple of Sportsters, and my Fat Bob a few years back, and it was a real improvement on the lighter bikes. As easily as those lighter bikes flick around, the stickier compounds just made for a bit more confidence in the corners. I'll take performance and better handling over longevity any day.
 
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