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I understand that soldering is a more efficient way of bonding 2 wires together rather than using butt connectors to mend 2 wires together, but for those that cant solder, using butt connectors would be the only obvious choice.

But, I was wondering, does it make a big difference, and is it okay, if I wanted to solder the wires from the amp harnesses front and rear output speaker harness to the front pods opposite end red and black wires?

Should I do it or no?
 

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Practice soldering, you can master it on the first wire. then heat shrink the connections.
On my boat stereo after the heat shrink was tight I put a little liquid tape on the ends. never had any issues.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

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I would not recommend soldering the wires from the amp to the speaker. As already stated, crimp connectors work just fine. Secondly, a good solder job is fine but an average or poor solder job will fail pretty quick. The insulated crimp on connectors are a buck or two more than the cheapo exposed connectors.

Also remember you're going to have to tune the amp. If you use a multi-meter to tune or a DD-1 distortion meter you will need somewhere to connect the meter leads. I use the male end of spade connectors on the amp end for just that reason. It's also easier if you ever swap speakers or decide to move wires around for whatever reason in the future.
 

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butt connecting the wires will do fine. theres quality butt connectors that can be heat shrunk to seal them which is what I would recommend using regardless of location of the wires. and yes use a quality crimping tool
 

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I soldered the speaker connections on my boat also because they kept falling off. but I have been soldering since I was a kid I just cant stop.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

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If you are going to heat shrink the connectors and space is limited, or you just want a nice tight splice, these uninsulated connectors are fine. Cost less too. You can also hit them with solder after crimping. Just heat the connector and feed the solder into the center hole.



And you can get the splices with heat shrink already on them. Just crimp and heat. But they can get a little costly if you need more than a few.



And you can get what are called step down splices. They come in handy when splicing on lighter wire to existing heavy circuits. Like when adding LED's to older incandescent scooters.

 

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If you are going to heat shrink the connectors and space is limited, or you just want a nice tight splice, these uninsulated connectors are fine. Cost less too. You can also hit them with solder after crimping. Just heat the connector and feed the solder into the center hole.



And you can get the splices with heat shrink already on them. Just crimp and heat. But they can get a little costly if you need more than a few.



And you can get what are called step down splices. They come in handy when splicing on lighter wire to existing heavy circuits. Like when adding LED's to older incandescent scooters.

I've used the crimp connectors w/shrink on them already, but that top guy....that's slick right there. I like it.
 

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Marine shrink wrap is another good choice, it has that sealant glue in kit when you heat and seal the connections, makes a good seal like the heat shrink butt connectors TD posted .
 

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If they are smaller wires find your local telephone guy and ask for "scotch locks" they are loaded with "icky pic" prevents rodents and repels moisture for corrosion resistance. He would probably just give ya a few for free. If you don't like em throw em in the drawer for another project! Strip wire, insert, squeeze together done and permanent.
 

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If they are smaller wires find your local telephone guy and ask for "scotch locks" they are loaded with "icky pic" prevents rodents and repels moisture for corrosion resistance. He would probably just give ya a few for free. If you don't like em throw em in the drawer for another project! Strip wire, insert, squeeze together done and permanent.
I happen to have a large stock of those at home (and work). I use them for various projects. If Ma Bell can use them and send 120v through them for a T1 line, they'll work just fine for any low voltage work.

Sent from my XT1710-02 using Tapatalk
 

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Practice soldering, you can master it on the first wire. then heat shrink the connections.
On my boat stereo after the heat shrink was tight I put a little liquid tape on the ends. never had any issues.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
Put the liquid tape on before the heat shrink.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

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I personally would never use scotch lock connectors , and we don't not use them in the shop either that I work in.
Scotch locks are the bane of the automotive world..... I cannot tell you how many wiring gremlins are created from using them. We see them the most on trailer wiring issues. People love to use them to wiring their utility trailers and what not. Whats most troubling is that, at first they work great. then after time, weather, and the constant vibration of use and roads they always work them selves loose. Creates resistance that burns and shorts the wiring out. or blows fuses. or simply just doesn't work even though, from all appearances the little devil is connected fine. They are fine in a pinch but people use them and then leave them installed. Weeks or months later your chasing gremlins because people couldn't be bothered with repairing it correctly. As a mechanic, personally I hate them and wish they were never invented. Sorry.... im stepping off my soap box now. :wink:
 

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Scotch locks are the bane of the automotive world..... I cannot tell you how many wiring gremlins are created from using them. We see them the most on trailer wiring issues. People love to use them to wiring their utility trailers and what not. Whats most troubling is that, at first they work great. then after time, weather, and the constant vibration of use and roads they always work them selves loose. Creates resistance that burns and shorts the wiring out. or blows fuses. or simply just doesn't work even though, from all appearances the little devil is connected fine. They are fine in a pinch but people use them and then leave them installed. Weeks or months later your chasing gremlins because people couldn't be bothered with repairing it correctly. As a mechanic, personally I hate them and wish they were never invented. Sorry.... im stepping off my soap box now. :wink:
Number one electrical culprits, they suck!>:)
 
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