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Discussion Starter #1
Last summer I picked up a new to me 2012 RGC with a Stage IV kit, D&D Fat Cat and HD Heavy Breather with 2K miles. Added another 2K miles over the summer.

I dropped it off to my mechanic to do some additions (apes, suspension) and he found it had a bad head gasket. We are going to tear the bike down and replace it.

My question is, has anyone gone from a Stage IV to a Stage V? Since the cylinders will be off I am looking at the HD upgrade, it looks like it can be had for around $1000 including shipping.

I rode a friends Stage IV CVO last year and it just seemed to have more bottom end than my stage IV 103.
 

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Last summer I picked up a new to me 2012 RGC with a Stage IV kit, D&D Fat Cat and HD Heavy Breather with 2K miles. Added another 2K miles over the summer.

I dropped it off to my mechanic to do some additions (apes, suspension) and he found it had a bad head gasket. We are going to tear the bike down and replace it.

My question is, has anyone gone from a Stage IV to a Stage V? Since the cylinders will be off I am looking at the HD upgrade, it looks like it can be had for around $1000 including shipping.

I rode a friends Stage IV CVO last year and it just seemed to have more bottom end than my stage IV 103.
I would look more at the heads and the cam that are in the bike and see what you can do to improve on the performance. I'm still not a fan of going to the new 110" setup. Got to remember, the lower end is the week link on these bikes. More cubes, more hp and more tq. Need to be smart about this.
 

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The head gaskets just don't blow out for just any reason, chances are the cylinder studs are pulled, If I was taking a guess the rear cylinder is the one that is blown and the pulled cylinder stud would be on the right side.
 

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The head gaskets just don't blow out for just any reason, chances are the cylinder studs are pulled, If I was taking a guess the rear cylinder is the one that is blown and the pulled cylinder stud would be on the right side.
Either that or whoever did the work didn't put a drop of oil under the head of the head bolt and gave false readings on the torque values. I've seen this happen so many times it's not funny.
 

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Either that or whoever did the work didn't put a drop of oil under the head of the head bolt and gave false readings on the torque values. I've seen this happen so many times it's not funny.
They may have also put too much oil in the head bolts and didn't let the oil drain. Too much oil in the head bolt will cause hydraulic tension and cause a false reading. I alway lube the head bolts and let them drain for at least an hour before installation.
Unfortunately increased compression also increases the chances of a pulled cylinder stud. Also high lift cams and high performance valve springs put more strain on the cylinder studs on the cam side.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So the heads are already done on the stage 4 kit, what would be a better cam than the 259? I tend to ride in the upper RPM's 3K or better most of the time. Due to work, life, etc whenever I take my bike out it is normally for a trip of 1500 miles or better, so most of that time is on the highway.
 

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So the heads are already done on the stage 4 kit, what would be a better cam than the 259? I tend to ride in the upper RPM's 3K or better most of the time. Due to work, life, etc whenever I take my bike out it is normally for a trip of 1500 miles or better, so most of that time is on the highway.
You got to watch getting your power band too far to the right if you do a lot of highway miles. You want a major part of your torque in the 2800-3100 rpm range so you don't have to downshift passing or going up hills. For a bar hopper a power band to the right is fine. Riding two up, you want the power band to the left more. There are a lot of good cams for you to choose from. Go to websites like Bobby Woods and go look at his dyno sheets for similar builds as yours. Look at the power bands a choose one that meets your needs. Look at the cam and then go to Big Boyz website cam compare. You can type in your 259 and then type in Woods cam of choice. Look at the lift, duration, etc. By doing this you can go look at Redshift cams, Andrews cams, etc. and find a cam that will fit what you need exactly. There is no magic bullet cam for everyone. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You got to watch getting your power band too far to the right if you do a lot of highway miles. You want a major part of your torque in the 2800-3100 rpm range so you don't have to downshift passing or going up hills. For a bar hopper a power band to the right is fine. Riding two up, you want the power band to the left more. There are a lot of good cams for you to choose from. Go to websites like Bobby Woods and go look at his dyno sheets for similar builds as yours. Look at the power bands a choose one that meets your needs. Look at the cam and then go to Big Boyz website cam compare. You can type in your 259 and then type in Woods cam of choice. Look at the lift, duration, etc. By doing this you can go look at Redshift cams, Andrews cams, etc. and find a cam that will fit what you need exactly. There is no magic bullet cam for everyone. Good luck.
Thanks Smarty, I appreciate the insight.
 

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IMO the cam is the most important part of the engine build, in most cases the correct cam will increase rear wheel torque and locate the torque band in the lower rpm range which is what you want in a touring model bike. You want the torque range to be in the lower rpm range because in most cases you will be riding in the 2000 to 4000 rpm area and cruising around 3000.
Fuel Moto has a lot of dyno sheets on the Woods cams, and with a little research you can find dyno sheets on other cam builds.
 

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Cams

I RUN THE S&S 585 CAM IT TURNS ON AT 2500 RPM AND TILL 5500 RPM I AM FLYING AT THAT RPM SO FAR I LIKE THE CAM I WOULD LIKE TO SEE THE SPECS ON DRAGOS NEW 600 LIFT CAM

585: Designed for 88 to 95 CID engines with compression ratios from 9.7:1 to 10.5:1 and 100 to 124 CID engines from 9:1 to 10:1 compression. Provides massive horsepower and torque increases starting at 3000rpm and holds steady all the way to redline. 3500-6000 rpm for 88" - 103" engines and 2500-5500 for larger engines.
 

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Set the compression at no more than 10:1 and use either a Wood 5-6, or a Cyclerama .575.
Hure torque off the bottom and in the mid.
Most folks over-cam, and the engineering at the moco seems to be no exception.
Scott
 
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