Road Glide banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have trailer-ed others people bikes to a shop, few times in my riding years trailer-ed mine to a shop . But I have never trailer-ed a bike or Rig to some place to ride. My wife IS retiring. She changed her mind again from November to now end of December or January . When she does I want to escape for a trip. I think we will be up to our buts in snow by then. I ride in snow a lot she does not always enjoy it.
Awhile back I purchased a trailer that will haul the Rig. Often reading others comments give you things to think about you may have over looked. Those of you that have trailered the bike for trips or seen the good and bad. Speak up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
342 Posts
Make sure your ramp does not have ice on it when you get home and unload. I wish I would of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,342 Posts
I have trailer-ed others people bikes to a shop, few times in my riding years trailer-ed mine to a shop . But I have never trailer-ed a bike or Rig to some place to ride. My wife IS retiring. She changed her mind again from November to now end of December or January . When she does I want to escape for a trip. I think we will be up to our buts in snow by then. I ride in snow a lot she does not always enjoy it.
Awhile back I purchased a trailer that will haul the Rig. Often reading others comments give you things to think about you may have over looked. Those of you that have trailered the bike for trips or seen the good and bad. Speak up.
is it an enclosed trailer?

if so, are you planning on sleeping in it?
i wired mine for air conditioning and heat so we could drop a mattress and sleep in it with the bike outside.
with all the campgrounds around the country it makes for a less expensive way to tour.

does your trailer have brakes?

does your towing vehicle have a hook-up for trailer brakes?

sorry for the questions but there's a lot of ground to cover.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
is it an enclosed trailer?

if so, are you planning on sleeping in it?
i wired mine for air conditioning and heat so we could drop a mattress and sleep in it with the bike outside.
with all the campgrounds around the country it makes for a less expensive way to tour.

does your trailer have brakes?

does your towing vehicle have a hook-up for trailer brakes?

sorry for the questions but there's a lot of ground to cover.
Open trailer even with Rig brakes on trailer are not an issue. As for camping , not going to happen ever again. My ford edge has plenty of weight and power to pull it.
We will camp by the creek here at home with grandchildren but that is as far as it goes.
Bike with sidecar only weights about 1,300.
We travel a lot with the bike, just never had a reason in the past to trailer it. Next May we want to take Payton with us to TN. While we can do it with the sidecar alone. It would be easier to trailer it there and ride. Payton wants to ride the Dragon in her sidecar and go over the missing link bridge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,342 Posts
Open trailer even with Rig brakes on trailer are not an issue. As for camping , not going to happen ever again. My ford edge has plenty of weight and power to pull it.
We will camp by the creek here at home with grandchildren but that is as far as it goes.
Bike with sidecar only weights about 1,300.
asked about brakes because i think if your combined load is more than 2,000 lbs. in some states (like ohio) it is required.

sounds like you've got it under control; hearing you talk at the Patti's run convinced me that you know from whence you speak lol

here's a pic that made me think about your past
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
asked about brakes because i think if your combined load is more than 2,000 lbs. in some states (like ohio) it is required.

sounds like you've got it under control; hearing you talk at the Patti's run convinced me that you know from whence you speak lol

here's a pic that made me think about your past
Can always learn and acquire a different way of looking at things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
A few thoughts we have learned along the way...

1) Consider mounting a 30” tall plate across the front of the trailer to protect the bike from road debris and provide a wheel stop for improved tie-down
2) Carry a spare tire for the trailer and make sure you have an appropriate jack and lug wrench
3) Devise multiple layers of security to ensure the trailers stays locked to the tow vehicle and the bike stays locked to the trailer when your trip involves an overnight stay along the way
4) Is your spouse comfortable driving and towing?
5) Get thick skinned - you now have a trailer queen. Nothing wrong with that, IMO, but there are those who will raz you about it.
6) While you have plenty of room in the SUV, still pack like you’ll be traveling on the bike. It’s no fun lugging all the extra gear around and never using it.
7) When selecting places to stay (e.g., Airbnb or VRBO), think about whether the property has a level pad for loading/off-loading the rig and ample parking for your tow vehicle and trailer. Most of the fun places to ride (And stay) have lots of hills! With the side car, you don’t have to worry as much about paved vs gravel/dirt road.
8) We tend to select locations that provide 7-10 days of riding, so we use a vacation rental as a base camp. Alternatively, we pick a launching point and tour for several days, then return to load back on the trailer. Regarding the latter, good places to leave the car/trailer are a biker friendly hotel/motel (preferably one with cameras monitoring the parking lot), a H-D dealership, or a secured self storage facility.

Enjoy your travels!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,043 Posts
i have a kendon dual ride up trailer. a year ago last summer, the wife and i went out to san diego from louisiana, in june. between time constraints, and the summer heat, we decided to trailer out there and ride there. it was awesome. we made the trip out and back a whole lot quicker than we would have on the bikes, and we were comfortable in our ac truck while the temps outside in the texas/new mexico/arizona desert were over 105°. my wife cannot do heat. not will not, but seriously, cannot. so we were able to make it out there in 2 days, as opposed to 4 or 5 on the bikes.

it sounds really simple, but something that we found invaluable was to take a plastic tote/footlocker and put everything that pertained to the trailer in it, ie. locks, tie downs, tools, etc. that way, if we needed something, we didn't have to search for it. it was right there.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,776 Posts
A few thoughts we have learned along the way...

1) Consider mounting a 30” tall plate across the front of the trailer to protect the bike from road debris and provide a wheel stop for improved tie-down Very important
2) Carry a spare tire for the trailer and make sure you have an appropriate jack and lug wrench Most important of all
3) Devise multiple layers of security to ensure the trailers stays locked to the tow vehicle and the bike stays locked to the trailer when your trip involves an overnight stay along the way
4) Is your spouse comfortable driving and towing?
5) Get thick skinned - you now have a trailer queen. Nothing wrong with that, IMO, but there are those who will raz you about it.
6) While you have plenty of room in the SUV, still pack like you’ll be traveling on the bike. It’s no fun lugging all the extra gear around and never using it.
7) When selecting places to stay (e.g., Airbnb or VRBO), think about whether the property has a level pad for loading/off-loading the rig and ample parking for your tow vehicle and trailer. Most of the fun places to ride (And stay) have lots of hills! With the side car, you don’t have to worry as much about paved vs gravel/dirt road.
8) We tend to select locations that provide 7-10 days of riding, so we use a vacation rental as a base camp. Alternatively, we pick a launching point and tour for several days, then return to load back on the trailer. Regarding the latter, good places to leave the car/trailer are a biker friendly hotel/motel (preferably one with cameras monitoring the parking lot), a H-D dealership, or a secured self storage facility.

Enjoy your travels!
Everything stated above plus the following;

Pattern your windshields and make some padding for them out of some heavy duty fabric. Because you have an open trailer, debris from other vehicles could hit and damage your windshields. On heavy equip we always would haul the units backed onto trailers and put a cut to fit/shape piece of plywood over the back window to protect it. Back windows are usually flat glass and easier/cheaper to replace.

Consider a close fitting travel cover like a "sknz" brand. Close fit that can be strapped tight. Loose covers flap in the breeze and cause more damage than they protect. They will have one for the bike, not sure about the chair. A travel cover along with the recommended 30" tall checkerboard plate or even framed plywood at an angle will keep the salt spray off of most of your painted and chrome parts, some road spray will always get up underneath but you can wash that away using multiple flushes of soapy water at low pressure. Like shampoo; wash, rinse, repeat.

Cross tie your rig, with extra straps, this is important. Cross tieing will help prevent the rig from bouncing side to side in the event that one of the regular tie downs breaks or becomes loose. Had a trike once in an enclosed trailer tied down to the outside but one strap came loose and it tried to "hug" the bike next to it. Caught it in time but it would have been an expensive fix on two custom paint jobs. It may seem like a pain in the ass, but straps are cheap compared to replacing sheet metal and repainting the same (nobody gives a s#!t what the trailer looks, dented, scratched etc). You're not in a race to load and unload, do it right once and travel worry free.

Check your straps at every fuel stop or every time you get out of the vehicle, peace of mind.

Calgaryglide
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
I trailer my bike quite a bit. Partly due to time constraints and when we do travel it's as a family of five plus two dogs and I like having the bike with even if it means only getting out for a part of the day.
While pricey, I invested in the Biker Bar from B&W. Once set up, pull bike on and it locks down, no straps required. I strapped for the first couple trips but found quickly it was not required. As far as trailering accessories go, I felt it was worth every penny and gives me a piece of mind when traveling.
I've never used the bar for a bike with side car and I don't recall seeing it anywhere either. I would think though you can use the bar on bike and strap the just the sidecar.

Beyond using the Biker Bar instead of wheel chock, I can't really add anything beyond what has been said in previous posts other than suggesting moving blankets for protecting windshields as calgary described above. They're cheap, heavy and soft.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,917 Posts
I highly recommend the Wheeldock for a front tire chock. I put a quick detach bar on my Aluma MC10 that's pretty much out of the way when the chock is not in it. I leave the quick detach bar on the trailer because it is not that big. it is held down by four bolts through the frame of the trailer but can be taken off if you need to.

Sent from my XT1710-02 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I highly recommend the Wheeldock for a front tire chock. I put a quick detach bar on my Aluma MC10 that's pretty much out of the way when the chock is not in it. I leave the quick detach bar on the trailer because it is not that big. it is held down by four bolts through the frame of the trailer but can be taken off if you need to.

Sent from my XT1710-02 using Tapatalk
I have had this for awhile it bolts down for trailer use . I have never used it on one. Plan to give it a try, adjust to just about any size wheel
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,917 Posts
I have had this for awhile it bolts down for trailer use . I have never used it on one. Plan to give it a try, adjust to just about any size wheel
Here's the WD on the trailer and one of just the bar that I leave on the trailer. There's two bolts holding the bar, not four as I thought earlier.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,492 Posts
Here's the WD on the trailer and one of just the bar that I leave on the trailer. There's two bolts holding the bar, not four as I thought earlier.
I have the original J&S which I like. And I just got a WheelDock last spring and I love it! I tried several cheaper ones and was never happy with them. Finally bit the bullet and I'm glad I did. Wheel Dock grabs the front wheel soooo much better !

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I trailer my bike quite a bit. Partly due to time constraints and when we do travel it's as a family of five plus two dogs and I like having the bike with even if it means only getting out for a part of the day.
While pricey, I invested in the Biker Bar from B&W. Once set up, pull bike on and it locks down, no straps required. I strapped for the first couple trips but found quickly it was not required. As far as trailering accessories go, I felt it was worth every penny and gives me a piece of mind when traveling.
I've never used the bar for a bike with side car and I don't recall seeing it anywhere either. I would think though you can use the bar on bike and strap the just the sidecar.

Beyond using the Biker Bar instead of wheel chock, I can't really add anything beyond what has been said in previous posts other than suggesting moving blankets for protecting windshields as calgary described above. They're cheap, heavy and soft.
That bar is interesting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,892 Posts
@twowheeladdict should be able to lend more info, he was using one for his RG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Plan now is to mount a Tool box in front of the rig. It will block some of the possible road trash and come in handy..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Tool box is mounted worked out as I had hoped. I have 11 inches on each sides of it . Plans for that area. Unloaded the rig Payton wants me to pick her up with it today at school.

 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top