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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I didn't see where anyone else posted a thread on the Vulcanworks sprocket install so I figured I would start one.

I installed mine soon after returning from SWIV. I initially installed it with the Baker manual primary chain adjuster, but have since went back to the Hayden M6. I found the Baker made my primary noise louder than I liked. I thought all the noise was from the SE Comp, but the slack in the chain with the Baker was adding to it even though properly adjusted.

Out with the worn out SE Comp. Not even 10k miles on it and it was noisy and made shifting loud.




This picture is of the Vulcanworks sprocket and the washers I had to buy to get the sprocket in proper alignment with the clutch basket sprocket. The sprocket does not come with spacers or instructions to let you know ahead of time that you will need spacers, but you will need 3/16" + or - of spacer between the rotor and the back of the sprocket.



I used a feeler gauge between the primary case and the outer face of the chain to gauge the thickness of spacer I would need. You can also use a straight edge between the clutch basket and sprocket to gauge the thickness required. You will need to remove the clutch basket in order to install the Vulcanworks sprocket. The SE Comp can be replaced without removing the clutch basket, but not the sprocket.




This pic is the final assembly with the exception that I ditched the Baker adjuster for a Hayden. I didn't take any pics of the Hayden but you all know what it looks like.




My initial thoughts after doing some riding is I like it. The big differences i have noticed are:

1. The loud clunk when shifting gears has gone away.
2. As you release the clutch the bike grabs and takes off with much more authority.
3. Neutral is much easier to find when the bike is hot. I was having issues with this at a stop with the clutch in before.
4. My 5th gear whine is a whole lot quieter than it was. I didn't hardly notice it over the weekend.
5. The primary area is much quieter in general than when I had the SE Comp.

I have not put enough miles in to give a good review, but I will try and remember to update as I log more miles.

One other thing to note. My motor has had some work to it and the crankshaft is welded. If I had not had that done I don't think I would have gone with a solid sprocket. The stock pressed cranks IMO might not hold up well with a solid sprocket.
 

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I have not put enough miles in to give a good review, but I will try and remember to update as I log more miles.

One other thing to note. My motor has had some work to it and the crankshaft is welded. If I had not had that done I don't think I would have gone with a solid sprocket. The stock pressed cranks IMO might not hold up well with a solid sprocket.
This is precisely the reason I was afraid of using the solid sprocket and went with the BDL compensator. I have an untouched crank with approx 37k miles. Unfortunately though the BDL didn't work out so well for me either. Please keep us posted on it. Thanks for the lil write up too
 

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I installed this sprocket about 1,000 miles ago. I have 43k on the stock motor. If it breaks = bigger better. I agree shifting is smoother, finding neutral easy/smooth, less noise in primary. It's win win for me! After some communication with Vulcanworks the required spacer will now be included with the sprocket to make the install a lot easier. Great customer service they even sent me $50 for my input and giving them the old comp to get the measurements for the spacer.
 

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I think when my warranty is up, and the next time I need a compensator, I'll be going the Vulcan route. Thanks for the write up, looks pretty straight forward.




Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #5
After some communication with Vulcanworks the required spacer will now be included with the sprocket to make the install a lot easier. Great customer service they even sent me $50 for my input and giving them the old comp to get the measurements for the spacer.
You obviously spoke to someone other than I did. Glad to hear they will include the spacer to new purchasers.

Thanks for the write up, looks pretty straight forward.Mike
It is pretty straightforward. If you can replace the compensator you can put this sprocket in.
 

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I emailed vulcanworks with a few questions about their sprocket before I purchased the BDL and whoever it was that replied to me was a dick. I wasn't asking oddball questions, just a few, what I thought were fairly simple questions but they made it sound like i was wasting their time or something
 

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I emailed vulcanworks with a few questions about their sprocket before I purchased the BDL and whoever it was that replied to me was a dick. I wasn't asking oddball questions, just a few, what I thought were fairly simple questions but they made it sound like i was wasting their time or something
Yes I got the same impression from there first e-mail. But in the end they realized there was a problem and they corrected it and that's what counts to me. Like most of us we have good days and bad it is what it is!!
 

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Called Vulcan Friday, had sprocket for 20k with a noise around 2.5-3 k rpm. Mentioned the spacer and new washer and I'm being sent those free of charge. Should solve this problem. Second time I've talked to them. Good experience and info.
 

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Vulcan works happens to be about 15 min from my house. I did not realize they were local and I had been buying parts from them for years. I showed up to buy a part one day and they were surprised. They do a ton of online and no store front. What I found is they are good company and good customer service every time I have gone there.
 

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Welding a stock crank is a total waste of time and 99% of that work weakens the crank. That unit is great for putting a helical twist into your output shaft. On built engines I have seen it twist a jims 131, snap a dark horse output clean off and make a very large mess in the primary. Watch the 3 videos very cool. For a everyday street bike I would use that item. For a drag race only type set up sure. The stock shaft is not strong enough to take the back and forth hammering. Not to mention the TIR on a stock output shaft, That that cushion has now been taken out and the chain and rear main shaft take the brunt of that action.


http://youtu.be/hkLUWqnk9s4?list=UUKYYRjEs8TYPYik-D3CeoFQ
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That's an interesting video. Would like to see someone with more smarts than me pony up an opposing view. My only thought was the testing method does not seem very calibrated and applying force with a 20-foot pole may not be an accurate way to mimic the forces applied to a crankshaft and flywheels.
 

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That's an interesting video. Would like to see someone with more smarts than me pony up an opposing view. My only thought was the testing method does not seem very calibrated and applying force with a 20-foot pole may not be an accurate way to mimic the forces applied to a crankshaft and flywheels.
Not saying S&S dont rock , because they do, but I wonder what real life torque is put on cranks via a 100 HP motor.
 
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