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Discussion Starter #1
I live in FL. This is summertime. That means, expect thunderstorms, even though the forecast said they were unlikely.

I went out yesterday afternoon; rode into AL about 45 miles from the house. As I was getting ready to come home, a heavy thunderstorm came through. I checked the weather radar and it showed the storm was moving rather quickly, so I stayed put until it passed. As I rode home, I was just behind the storm and I could see the edge of the rain out in front of me. I managed to stay behind the rain and did not get wet.

I live down a dirt road, about a 1/2 mile from the pavement. The road was no longer dirt; it was mud. I managed the first 2/3 of the road, even though it was quite slipery. I had gotten to a point in the road where in about 50 yards, I could have gotten off the mud and onto some grass when it happened. The front tire sunk down and got caught in a rut. I managed to fight it for a time, but then the tire caught a bump, popped out of the rut, turned sideways and I just couldn't keep up. I was fishtailing when the bottom fell out. I think the tires were still gripping somewhat, but when the ground moves from under you, I don't know what else you can do. I guess you can say I low sided it and went down. The bike ended up about 90 degrees to the direction of travel, laying in the middle of the road. I walked the rest of the way back to the house and had to wait for my neighbor to get home from church until I could get the bike out of the mud and get it home. At the spot we got the bike back up, the mud was about 1 inch deep. The bike will be getting a bath today.

If there are any dirt riders out there that can offer any tips about riding in this shit, I'm all ears.
 

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Well, on a dirt bike I would tell you "if in doubt throttle it out", which usually means you can straighten it out and lighten the front end, but in this case I think you and/or pretty much anyone else was doomed to drop it in that much mud with ruts. Glad your not hurt and I bet the bike isn't either, I hope.
 

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Without pics it didn't happen..........................

Sorry it happened to you, BUT you weren't hurt and really, that all that matters.
Parts can be replaced, and personally speaking, 10 months of rehab sucks BIG TIME
 

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1. Petition the county to gravel the road at a minimum.
2. If there is a place to park a vehicle and trailer, invest in an enclosed trailer to store the bike and haul it to pavement for a ride.
3. Trade the Road Glide in on a Dual Sport, Adventure type bike. Or add a cheap one like the Royal Enfield Himalayan for rides when it might rain.
4. Rent a storage building on pavement to park the Road Glide. Ride the car or the Himalayan to the storage facility and then take the Road Glide out for a ride.

Personally, I would not own a Road Glide if my only option was to slop through the mud to ride it.
 

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If there are any dirt riders out there that can offer any tips about riding in this shit, I'm all ears.
Dirt Bikes that weigh 200lbs with Knobbies are way different than 1000 LBS RGs with Dunnies

I guess if u had to try to even suggest something....keep the RPMs constant and front end light and try to steer with the rear ...but in that you described....its dumb luck either way if the bike goes down or stays up
 

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I rode dirt bikes when I was younger, I could literally manhandle a dirt bike, and as mentioned earlier, throttle out of most situations. 800 lbs is a lot of bike to hold up in the mud, I’m glad it was slow speed and you weren’t seriously injured.
 

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Mud sux. At least you are ok and hopefully a good bath is all the bike needs.

Wish the half mile of road I live on and my 400’ driveway were paved but they are at least gravel and recycled asphalt


Sent from the Rockies of Colorado
 
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Most important you're not hurt.

If it was my story, I'm sure it would be getting better and more dramatic as it ages...

"there was only 1/4 mile left to go, the mud was getting close to seven and a half inches deep, it was hard to measure because of the pelting hail and rain.
That's when I saw her, a mother of three, unemployed, with her children, riding a street glide right towards the mud and certain doom. I goosed the throttle, got the front end light and headed straight for her. During the brief sprint in her direction, I managed to reprogrammed the linked braking system allowing me a near perfect rear wheel lock and 272 degree spin in the mud, all JIT to be able to stop the woman before she entered the mud, saving the day!
As I turned to leave my jiffy stand hit a discarded Teflon pan covered by the mud causing me to slip and fall over, briefly, damn."
 

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Shitty deal. Glad you are ok and hopefully a wash will set the bike right. Like others said not much you can do in that situation. If you go to slow you will surely sink and if you go to fast the bike will slide out from under you and in that slop there may not be a perfect speed.
 

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I've ridden dirt bikes and adventure bikes all my life. (First Harley August 2019). I agree with the rest of the boys. There's no way to ride a 900 pound road glide with street tires in mud without crashing: (unless you can walk on water, make water into wine, give the blind their sight, come back from the dead.....you get the idea). If there's any way you can securely store it when it rains (maybe locked in a sea-can?/Maybe trailer it to the asphalt if its gonna rain and trailer it back to house?) I'd do that. If it's dry gravel; my advice would be to keep your speed reasonable...like at least 35mph and don't try to "steer" too much. If you have enough speed the gyroscopic force keeps the bike upright and you gotta hold the bars loosely and let her dance a bit. She won't fall down. Warning: (this does not work in mud. nothing works in mud.)
 

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Mud sux. At least you are ok and hopefully a good bath is all the bike needs.

Wish the half mile of road I live on and my 400’ driveway were paved but they are at least gravel and recycled asphalt


Sent from the Rockies of Colorado
About a month ago they put that recycled asphalt down for my 1/8 mile ride from pavement to my driveway, which is good gravel even when it is raining. So far I am a big fan of the recycled asphalt, no more slop when it is wet and no dust when it is dry.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'm OK and the bike is OK. The highway peg moved, I'll just need to put it back into place. Oh, if ONLY weighed 800 lbs, that would be great. As I understand it, it runs around 950 lbs. The Ultra Limited was worse, at least now I'm not fighting the fairing weight on the steering.

This is not the first time this has happened to me. As time goes by, I am getting better at this, but...

Trailers, storage buildings, parking the bike someplace else, those are all nonstarters. I try to use the bike for transportation as much as I can. Loading and unloading a trailer just isn't worth the effort and would take to much time. Those tires look interesting. Several years ago I tried searching for tires but couldn't find any that were rated for the weight of the bike. 35 mph? I have discovered going faster will keep the bike going, but 35 sounds to fast to me, but I don't know, that's why I ask. At what point does it get to be to fast?

I have learned to stay away from the front brake. I had the motor running about 2000 RPM, using the clutch and rear brake to control the speed and I was running between 15 - 20 mph. Twice before I went down, the front started to skid (very slightly) and by letting the clutch out, the back end came out and started following the front and I kept going.

SE, you mentioned steering with the rear. How do you do that? I've not heard of that before.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Most important you're not hurt.

If it was my story, I'm sure it would be getting better and more dramatic as it ages...

"there was only 1/4 mile left to go, the mud was getting close to seven and a half inches deep, it was hard to measure because of the pelting hail and rain.
That's when I saw her, a mother of three, unemployed, with her children, riding a street glide right towards the mud and certain doom. I goosed the throttle, got the front end light and headed straight for her. During the brief sprint in her direction, I managed to reprogrammed the linked braking system allowing me a near perfect rear wheel lock and 272 degree spin in the mud, all JIT to be able to stop the woman before she entered the mud, saving the day!
As I turned to leave my jiffy stand hit a discarded Teflon pan covered by the mud causing me to slip and fall over, briefly, damn."
I know how this works. I like to fish also. "You should have seen the one that got away. I had it up alongside the boat, but were never going to be able to get it in; the boat was to small. So we had to cut the line. Dang! You shoulda seen it."
 

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Sorry to hear. Glad you’re ok.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Ike, going to your fight with the deer. If you look on top of my lower, you can see my deer whistle. I have one on each side. About $8 at O'Riely's. I've seen the deer react to them but you can't predict what they will do after hearing them. Sometimes they freeze, sometimes they run. But for $8 I figure what have I got to loose.
 
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